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Game-Based Learning Units for the Everyday Teacher

Game-Based Learning Units for the Everyday Teacher
Game-based learning (GBL) is getting a lot press. It is an innovative practice that is working to engage kids in learning important 21st century skills and content. Dr. Judy Willis in a previous post wrote about the neurological benefits and rationale around using games for learning. She also gives tips about using the game model in the classroom. James Paul Gee has long been a champion for game-based learning in speeches, blogs, and books. Myths About Game-Based Learning First, let's clarify a couple things. Gee refers to teachers as "learning designers," and I couldn't agree more. Inspired by the work I've seen, here is an overview of components and structure for the everyday teacher to implement game-based learning Overall Structure: Individual Quests and Boss Levels A game-based learning unit should consist of both smaller quests and more robust boss levels. Boss levels are more rigorous missions that require students to synthesize the content and skills learned in the quests. Avatar

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/video-game-model-unit-andrew-miller

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The nine golden rules of using games in the language classroom I think you might want to download these activities so you can use them later… so here’s a handy PDF file of this blog post! I’ve long been an admirer of the use of games in teaching. Indeed, one of my most popular posts ever here on the Teach them English blog is the rather misleadingly titled ‘Why I don’t use games in the language classroom’ which, if you’ve got a spare ten minutes, gives you as good a background into the role of games in the language classroom as you’ll ever need (no need for me to be modest!).

Beyond Badges: Why Gamify? Mashable defines gamification as "applying game thinking or even game mechanics into a non-game context. " Game mechanics in the "real world" include earning badges, completing missions and leveling up. Non-game companies, like Amazon, Deloitte and Salesforce.com, gamify to increase customer engagement. Gamification puts the customer on a journey motivated by intrinsic, or personally meaningful, rewards. An example is earning a "mayorship" badge on the mobile application Foursquare by "checking in" regularly to the same location. Gamification in the classroom has many benefits, too. After all, engaging a student intrinsically in the learning process, rather than with extrinsic motivators like grades, is the goal of every teacher.

Quest - Write text adventure games and interactive stories Quest lets you make interactive story games. Text adventure games like Zork and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Gamebooks like the Choose Your Own Adventure and Fighting Fantasy books. GameSites NOTE: Click on any of the anchor links you find interesting, read more about them, then click the headings to visit the website! Kindersite- List of 100s of Games The Kindersite spearheaded by Joel Josephson (@acerview54) has 1000s of educational and fun content specifically designed for preschool, kindergartens, elementary, primary schools and special needs students. Register for free for full featured access, but it’s not required.

Game based learning & Gamification Lots people want to get started with game based learning, gamification and serious games in their training. We’ve been curating game related content for over a year and a half while conducting our own research and case studies. Here are 100 articles related to games and learning. Some of them are research-based, while others just offer an interesting perspective to spark discussion. Take what you need and share this with a colleague. Game Based Learning Mobile Games for Adult Learning: What’s the Appeal? Harness the Power of Play: The 5 steps of Game Design In this lecture we discuss how games increase the challenge over time using Leveling. Levels are used to train the player in the skills needed to complete the challenges. They provide a system for measuring the skills from beginner or novice to becoming a master.

Awesome Websites to Get Your Kids Hooked on Programming - TheITBros The success stories of people who used MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) to pick up new skills and even change careers aren’t exactly rare nowadays. You probably have heard of people learning how to code by signing up for classes on sites like Coursera, eDX, and Udacity, then leveraging the knowledge that they’ve gained to find jobs and/or internships. But what if your ten-year old kid expresses an interest in becoming a computer programmer? These MOOC sites aren’t exactly kid-friendly, and most of the courses that are hosted there require at least highschool-level knowledege to fully comprehend (plus kids might not be so keen on participating in online class discussions if their classmates are scary grownups). Thankfully, there are a few child-friendly options that kids (and kids-at-heart!) can play and program with.

Create your own Interactive Fiction What is Interactive Fiction? Interactive Fiction (formerly referred to as Text Adventures) are a cross between reading a book and playing a game, where you control the main character. Rather than reading the story from start to finish, you interact with everything by typing commands at a prompt, discovering things as you go along. Well written games give you, the player, the impression that anything you type is understood by giving a sensible and meaningful response. Indeed, part of the fun of playing interactive fiction games is discovering responses to things you didn't expect to have been catered for. Most interactive fiction follows the same basic rules - these include walking from location to location using compass directions (north, east, south-west etc).

Submrge Garry’s Mod A physics-based “sandbox” in which users can do almost anything, with a wide selection of assets (3D models, sounds, actions). Read More Spaceteam Allows multiple players using the same wifi to control a spaceship by executing various technical commands. Badge Alliance » Why Badges? badge [baj]: a special or distinctive mark, token, or device worn as a sign of allegiance, membership, authority, achievement, etc. (Source: Dictionary.com) A badge is a symbol or indicator of an accomplishment, skill, quality or interest. CodeSpells: Express Yourself With Magic by ThoughtSTEM When we were young, wizards like Gandalf and Dumbledore struck a chord in our minds. We spent hours pretending to be wizards and casting epic imaginary spells. Now, we want to bring that kind of creative freedom to video games. Instead of giving the player pre-packaged spells, CodeSpells allows you to craft your own magical spells. It's the ultimate spellcrafting sandbox.

Alice.org Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming. It allows students to learn fundamental programming concepts in the context of creating animated movies and simple video games.

Free Storyline Templates Need a course, quiz, game, tour of the world, or guys who can harmonize? Here are some Articulate Storyline templates I made to share. Storyline 2: Fun Academic Template This is a fully-customizable course template looking for a nice project to work on. Storyline 2: Tic-Tac-Toe Game Template This is a fully-customizable game template looking to have some fun! Welcome, Inventors! App Inventor is a free, cloud-based service that allows you to make your own mobile apps using a blocks based programming language. You access App Inventor using a web browser (Chrome, Firefox, Safari). With these beginner-friendly tutorials, you will learn the basics of programming apps for Android devices. You will need: A Mac or Windows computer (see system requirements)An internet connection

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