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10 Best Free Listening Websites with Quizzes to Practise for Listening Exams

10 Best Free Listening Websites with Quizzes to Practise for Listening Exams
So what do you do to practise listening for exams? Growing up, I never had the opportunity to do any extra practice to improve my listening skills. We didn’t have the Internet and the thousand possibilities it offers to learners of any language nowadays. The teachers had an old tape player that sometimes stopped and started on its own and old tapes that ended up sounding distorted and most of the times unlistenable so if you wanted to get better at listening, you just listened to the radio and struggled to understand the lyrics and sing along. Not that I ever complained. That was the perfect excuse to listen to music while claiming to be working hard. So, exams are just around the corner and I know you’re beginning to freak out. These are, in my opinion, the best sites with quizzes to practise listening comprehension. Check also:

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Teach Past Simple Tense With Michael Rosen Rap Rate this post: [Total: 11 Average: 2.1] I have already shared many materials to teach the past simple tense here. English listening exercises and tests with selected talks English Levels (Based on the CEFR) A2: Basic - Elementary B1: Intermediate B2: Upper Intermediate C1: Advanced BusyTeacher.org While these are crucial concepts, others are equally important. What follows is an assortment of alternative ways to teach listening, some quite simple and others based on many years of research. In each case, I will explain each one briefly and give you a suggestion for using it in class. In addition, I have provided a list of resources about each item, for readers who want to learn more about a topic. Get the Entire BusyTeacher Library: Dramatically Improve the Way You Teach

282 original ideas for Argumentative Speech Topics An argumentative speech is a persuasive speech in which the speaker attempts to persuade his audience to alter their viewpoints on a controversial issue. While a persuasive speech may be aimed more at sharing a viewpoint and asking the audience to consider it, an argumentative speech aims to radically change the opinions already held by the audience. This type of speech is extremely challenging; therefore, the speaker should be careful to choose a topic which he feels prepared to reinforce with a strong argument. Argumentative speeches generally concern topics which are currently being debated by society, current controversial issues.

How to boost your students’ vocabulary whilst creating a positive learning environment Introduction The validity of Stephen Krashen’s Affective-filter hypothesis as a theory has been discounted by many a scholar, mainly due to its unfalsifiability. However, it is undeniable that a positive and enjoyable learning environment in which the students feel safe, respected, validated, liked and listened to by their teacher and peers, benefits language acquisition in many ways, both in terms of motivation and in reducing learner anxiety – the number-one inhibitor of language learning according to much research. To create such an environment is a pedagogic imperative, whatever methodology or theory of L2 learning one espouses. Moreover, we know that linguistic input that is perceived by our students as emotionally salient, is more likely to be retained. Here are five strategies I use in my classroom to create a positive and enjoyable learning environment based on mutual trust and respect whilst expanding and/or consolidating my students lexical and even grammatical repertoire.

The 10 Best Places to Find ELT Listening Materials – Teach them English If, like me, you find that one of the most commonly heard requests from your learners is to provide them with additional listening materials to study with outside of class, this post is definitely for you. I’ve trawled the internet and the result of my extensive labors is the list of ten great resources you see below… enjoy! 1) Link Eng Park This site doesn’t actually produce any of its own materials, but it’s as close as an encyclopedia of all ESL online listening materials as you’re ever likely to find. If you can’t find something here for your teaching context, you almost might as well stop searching! Reasons why I use this site BusyTeacher.org YouTube, as well as websites such as wikihow.com, instructables.com, and soyouwanna.com, have an incredible assortment of guides on how to do almost anything, from cutting up onions to making paper airplanes. In this article, I’m going to explain how to adapt a video tutorial into a listening lesson for your ESL/EFL classes. How-to videos contain a number of features which makes them perfect for exploitation in the ESL/EFL classroom: authentic English with natural pronunciation content that relates to everyday life a wide range of topics that can be used images and (in some cases) titles and subtitles which make the meaning clearer the pleasure of learning a useful skill and new English vocabulary at the same time The following sections will guide you through several steps of planning for using a how-to video in class.

The Seven Best Short Films for ELT Students - Kieran Donaghy I’ve been writing lesson plans designed around short films for my website Film English for six years. Teachers often ask me how I find the short films I use in my lesson plans. The answer is quite simple: I’ve watched literally thousands of short films and developed an instinct for the type of engaging and simple short films which will work in the ELT classroom. In this article I’d like to share what for me are the seven best short films for the language classroom.

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