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Ten ways to support your child’s English-learning at home

As the British Council opens a new Learning Time with Shaun & Timmy centre in Mexico for two- to six-year-olds, senior teacher Sarah Reid offers some useful tips for supporting your child’s learning at home. More and more parents want their children to learn English from a young age. I often meet parents of children as young as two or three who say that proficiency in speaking English will help their child 'get ahead in a globalised world'. In other words, the sooner their children get started, the better. The single most important factor in a child’s success with English is their parents' interest and encouragement, no matter what their child’s age. So what can parents do at home to support their learning? 1. To build a positive attitude towards learning, and towards English as a language, the best place to start is with yourself. 2. Children will naturally learn everything around them without any adult intervention. 3. 4. 5. You can easily replicate activities like this at home. 6. 7.

https://www.britishcouncil.org/voices-magazine/ten-ways-support-your-childs-english-learning-home

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