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The Animal Boogie

The Animal Boogie
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Tools for Teaching A preview of Smithsonian Folkways on iTunes U. Click the image to launch iTunes on your computer. Smithsonian Folkways is committed to offering educational materials to complement the music on our site. Tools for Teaching from Smithsonian Folkways provides ideas and resources for educators to inspire their use of Folkways music from around the world. Curricular experience, activities, streaming videos, liner notes, music samples, and other features are available for free. iTunes U Find Smithsonian Folkways Tools for Teaching at iTunes U.

What to consider when teaching English in large classes How many students do you teach? Do you feel that your classes are too big? Author and education consultant Jason Anderson looks at the issues and offers some potential solutions. For many of us, our classes are larger than we would like them to be. Definitions of a large class What we label a ‘large class’ depends mostly on context and expectations. In this article, we will take the midpoint between these two figures. Where teachers work in large classes today Perhaps the two continents where teachers most commonly work in large classes are Africa (especially sub-Saharan Africa) and Asia (especially the Indian sub-continent and China). This is not a uniform picture. Large classes are not unique to low-income countries. The challenges of working in large classes We can divide the challenges into two general areas: 1. 2. TLC challenges include the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. Working toward solutions to classroom problems Problem: My students aren’t motivated to speak in English.

‘Melody’ Continue reading the main story Video For more than two decades, my home country of has had a stable democracy, as well as a thriving economy. At the same time, Chile has one of the largest wealth disparities in the world, reinforced by high tuition rates for secondary and college education. This means Chile has practically no social mobility, for how do you build a better future for yourself without education? Curanilahue is a small former coal-mining town that until recently was one of the poorest in Chile. Nearly all of the Curanilahue Orchestra’s children have pursued higher education, and most of them are the first generation in their families to graduate from a university. As this Op-Doc shows, Melody became a conductor for the new Children’s Orchestra in Chonchi, a small town on the distant southern island of Chiloé. My background is in narrative filmmaking and this is my first documentary.

Whole Child Development Is Undervalued The question is how to make such an approach both systemic and sustainable. Whole Person Socio-emotional, physical, creative, and cognitive capacities are deeply intertwined and equally important in ensuring a child's wellbeing, learning, and growth. (That shouldn't be a surprise to anyone studying or supporting children's learning.) Nobel laureate James Heckman, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, has shown that the non-cognitive skills emerging in early childhood are among the strongest predictors of adult outcomes. The development of these qualities, which rely on an individual's self-worth and self-control, critically outperform any other positive measures of children's long-term outcomes, whether academically or intellectually. The most impactful way of supporting such skills is associated with helping children feel in control of their learning process. Whole Communities Whole Societies

Free Kids Music | Free MP3 song downloads for children! How to teach children English using illustrated storybooks What makes illustrated storybooks such a good resource for teaching young learners of English? The British Council’s Gail Ellis, co-author of a storytelling handbook for primary English language teachers, explains. Listen to an interview with Gail in our podcast and register for her webinar taking place on Thursday, 2 October. Illustrated storybooks provide an ideal resource for helping children learn English. Why use storybooks in the classroom? Teachers can use storybooks to complement an English language course or as the main teaching resource. Storybooks can meet a variety of learner needs The expansion in the teaching of English around the world to ever younger ages, and the variation in policy from one country to another, means that teachers are finding themselves teaching classes of children with diverse learning needs and varying levels of English. Selecting the right storybook What to consider when reading a story aloud Reading a storybook aloud requires preparation.

Purple Planet Royalty Free Music Practical tips By Opal Dunn, educational consultant and author Introduction Young children learn English differently from most adults. Most have an innate ability to pick up English while taking part in activities, by making sense of what they are doing and picking up the adult’s language that accompanies the activity. Planned English sessions You can plan regular sessions which will usually take place: at home on regular days for about ten to twenty minutes adjusted to fit your child’s increasing English ability and ability to concentrate as a planned programme that reviews and builds on known activities and introduces new ones. Short English sessions These are more informal and can take place: any place – in the car, at bathtime, in a supermarket queue any time in response to a mood or special experience. As your child’s English ability increases, short English sessions tend to occur more frequently. Basic programme English corner or English table Ideas for activities Crafts Family activities Rhymes and songs

Glossary of Musical Instruments by Hobgoblin Music This list is based on information originally compiled by ARC music, and has been extensively revised, extended and developed for the internet by Pete McClelland at Hobgoblin Music. Please E-mail me if you know of instruments not listed, so I can add them. There is now a Basque language translation of this page by Jennifer Indurayne. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Back to Top Accordion: Free reed instrument with a keyboard originating in Saxony and Bohemia, now common throughout the world in folk music. Various types include piano and button keyboards, and chromatic and diatonic tunings.Agogo: Two wooden or metal tubes or blocks on a wooden or metal frame, one larger and lower pitched than the other. hit with sticks.Alboka: A double clarinet of Basque Country. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Back to Top Cabasa: South American rattle.

Ten ways to support your child’s English-learning at home As the British Council opens a new Learning Time with Shaun & Timmy centre in Mexico for two- to six-year-olds, senior teacher Sarah Reid offers some useful tips for supporting your child’s learning at home. More and more parents want their children to learn English from a young age. I often meet parents of children as young as two or three who say that proficiency in speaking English will help their child 'get ahead in a globalised world'. In other words, the sooner their children get started, the better. The single most important factor in a child’s success with English is their parents' interest and encouragement, no matter what their child’s age. 1. To build a positive attitude towards learning, and towards English as a language, the best place to start is with yourself. The British Council recently polled 2,000 adults from the UK and found that 40 per cent of them were nervous about speaking in a foreign language when on holiday. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. ‘Could you pass me the glue, please?’

Instruments :: Philharmonia Orchestra Here, the Philharmonia's expert players guide you through the intricacies of the instruments they play. Choose an instrument from one of the sections. The string section is the basis of the orchestra and the one consistent component of orchestras down the ages. The range of expression available and the great stamina of strings makes them a powerful tool. The Principal of the First Violin section is also the Leader of the orchestra. The wind section is traditionally known as the woodwind section even though not all the instruments are made of wood (for example the saxophone is made of metal). The traditional line-up of the brasses is: Horns, Trumpets, Trombones, Tubas. The percussion section includes any number of instruments from timpani to tubular bells and from castanettes to congas.

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