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Learn Git Branching

Learn Git Branching

http://learngitbranching.js.org/

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PHP: Référence des fonctions - Manual The 5th Annual China PHP Conference Affecte le comportement de PHP » « Using SystemTap with PHP DTrace Static Probes Manuel PHP Git One of the topics that I didn't cover in depth in the Pro Git book is the reset command. Most of the reason for this, honestly, is that I never strongly understood the command beyond the handful of specific use cases that I needed it for. I knew what the command did, but not really how it was designed to work. Since then I have become more comfortable with the command, largely thanks to Mark Dominus's article re-phrasing the content of the man-page, which I always found very difficult to follow. After reading that explanation of the command, I now personally feel more comfortable using reset and enjoy trying to help others feel the same way.

The Clean Architecture Over the last several years we’ve seen a whole range of ideas regarding the architecture of systems. These include: Hexagonal Architecture (a.k.a. Ports and Adapters) by Alistair Cockburn and adopted by Steve Freeman, and Nat Pryce in their wonderful book Growing Object Oriented Software Onion Architecture by Jeffrey Palermo Screaming Architecture from a blog of mine last year DCI from James Coplien, and Trygve Reenskaug. BCE by Ivar Jacobson from his book Object Oriented Software Engineering: A Use-Case Driven Approach Team Collaboration With GitHub GitHub has become the corner stone for all things open source software. Developers love it, collaborate on it and are constantly building awesome projects through it. Apart from hosting our code, GitHub's main attraction is using it as a collaborative tool. In this tutorial, let's explore some of the most useful GitHub features, especially for working in teams, making it all the more efficient, productive and, most importantly, fun! One thing that I find very useful is integrating the Github Wiki into the main source code project.

Understanding the GitHub Flow · GitHub Guides GitHub Flow is a lightweight, branch-based workflow that supports teams and projects where deployments are made regularly. This guide explains how and why GitHub Flow works. Create a branch PSR-1: Basic Coding Standard - PHP-FIG This section of the standard comprises what should be considered the standard coding elements that are required to ensure a high level of technical interoperability between shared PHP code. The key words “MUST”, “MUST NOT”, “REQUIRED”, “SHALL”, “SHALL NOT”, “SHOULD”, “SHOULD NOT”, “RECOMMENDED”, “MAY”, and “OPTIONAL” in this document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119. Overview Files MUST use only <?php and <?= tags. Files MUST use only UTF-8 without BOM for PHP code.

Viewing the Commit History After you have created several commits, or if you have cloned a repository with an existing commit history, you’ll probably want to look back to see what has happened. The most basic and powerful tool to do this is the git log command. These examples use a very simple project called “simplegit”. To get the project, run $ git clone Teach kids programming A collection of resources I’ve been gathering the best resources to teach children & teens programming — books, environments, apps, courseware and games. These resources are meant for teachers and parents who want to have their children fall in love with computers and see the magic of programming.

A successful Git branching model » nvie.com In this post I present the development model that I’ve introduced for some of my projects (both at work and private) about a year ago, and which has turned out to be very successful. I’ve been meaning to write about it for a while now, but I’ve never really found the time to do so thoroughly, until now. I won’t talk about any of the projects’ details, merely about the branching strategy and release management. It focuses around Git as the tool for the versioning of all of our source code.

Getting started with Git In the introduction to this series we learned who should use Git, and what it is for. Today we will learn how to clone public Git repositories, and how to extract individual files without cloning the whole works. Since Git is so popular, it makes life a lot easier if you're at least familiar with it at a basic level. If you can grasp the basics (and you can, I promise!)

PSR-2: Coding Style Guide - PHP-FIG This guide extends and expands on PSR-1, the basic coding standard. The intent of this guide is to reduce cognitive friction when scanning code from different authors. It does so by enumerating a shared set of rules and expectations about how to format PHP code. The style rules herein are derived from commonalities among the various member projects. When various authors collaborate across multiple projects, it helps to have one set of guidelines to be used among all those projects. Thus, the benefit of this guide is not in the rules themselves, but in the sharing of those rules.

Basic Branching and Merging Let’s go through a simple example of branching and merging with a workflow that you might use in the real world. You’ll follow these steps: Do work on a web site.Create a branch for a new story you’re working on.Do some work in that branch. At this stage, you’ll receive a call that another issue is critical and you need a hotfix. You’ll do the following: Switch to your production branch.Create a branch to add the hotfix.After it’s tested, merge the hotfix branch, and push to production.Switch back to your original story and continue working.

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