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GitHub Flow – Scott Chacon

GitHub Flow – Scott Chacon
August 31, 2011 Issues with git-flow I travel all over the place teaching Git to people and nearly every class and workshop I’ve done recently has asked me what I think about git-flow. I always answer that I think that it’s great - it has taken a system (Git) that has a million possible workflows and documented a well tested, flexible workflow that works for lots of developers in a fairly straightforward manner. It has become something of a standard so that developers can move between projects or companies and be familiar with this standardized workflow. However, it does have its issues. One of the bigger issues for me is that it’s more complicated than I think most developers and development teams actually require. Both of these issues can be solved easily just by having a much more simplified process. Its simplicity gives it a number of advantages. GitHub Flow So, why don’t we use git-flow at GitHub? There are a number of advantages to deploying so regularly. How We Do It Conclusion

http://scottchacon.com/2011/08/31/github-flow.html

Related:  GitSystem

Must Have Git Aliases: Advanced Examples - Be Present Now Over the course of a few years I piled up a long list of git aliases. This post will assume you know what aliases are and you have defined a few for yourself. I rely on many of them dozens of times a day. And maybe some have slipped your radar. Git - Revision Control Perfected In 2005, after just two weeks, Linus Torvalds completed the first version of Git, an open-source version control system. Unlike typical centralized systems, Git is based on a distributed model. It is extremely flexible and guarantees data integrity while being powerful, fast and efficient. With widespread and growing rates of adoption, and the increasing popularity of services like GitHub, many consider Git to be the best version control tool ever created. Surprisingly, Linus had little interest in writing a version control tool before this endeavor.

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Using Git for Deployment - Dan Barber I’ve been using Git for deployment now for some time, and I thought it might be helpful to others if I document how I did it. Partly this is because I can’t find the original guide that I used, so if you recognise the method I use here and you did it first, let me know and I’ll attribute you! Update: This is the original article: Thanks to Tim for the link in his comment! For the purposes of this guide I’m going to assume that you have your website live already, and that it is not already in a Git repository. If your situation is different you will have to adapt the steps accordingly.

Nick Farina - Git Is Simpler Than You Think It was about one year ago that we switched to Git. Previously, we used Subversion, through the Mac app Versions, which (rightly) holds an Apple Design Award. I made the executive decision to leave our comfy world of Versions because it seemed clear that Git was winning the Internet. There was much grumbling from my teammates, who were busy enough doing actual work thank you very much. But I pressed forward. We signed up for accounts on Github. SourceTree 1.5: Going With The FlowBitbucket By Jeff Park on July 17, 2012 Steve Streeting has made it his mission to reach out to SourceTree users and listen to what they have to say. In the last couple months, he’s even traveled to San Francisco from his hometown in the UK, hosting a drinkup to meet SourceTree customers face to face. He’s taken your feedback and pushed out some of the features you’ve asked for in the latest release – SourceTree 1.5!

10 things I love about git Not everyone loves git. It’s true! But I do, and here are some reasons why. 1. Branching for experiments Understanding the GitHub Flow · GitHub Guides GitHub Flow is a lightweight, branch-based workflow that supports teams and projects where deployments are made regularly. This guide explains how and why GitHub Flow works. Create a branch When you're working on a project, you're going to have a bunch of different features or ideas in progress at any given time – some of which are ready to go, and others which are not. Branching exists to help you manage this workflow. When you create a branch in your project, you're creating an environment where you can try out new ideas.

UbuntuUpdates - PPA: Chris Lea Nodejs This repository is available for: Lucid Precise Saucy Trusty Utopic To install this PPA: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:chris-lea/node.js sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install <package name> Using Pull Requests Pull requests let you tell others about changes you've pushed to a GitHub repository. Once a pull request is sent, interested parties can review the set of changes, discuss potential modifications, and even push follow-up commits if necessary. This guide walks through the process of sending a hypothetical pull request and using the various code review and management tools to take the change to completion. A Quick Note on Collaborative Development Models There are two popular models of collaborative development on GitHub: Fork & Pull

Specifying a Ruby Version ruby Table of Contents Selecting a version of Ruby You’ll need to install 1.2.0 of bundler to use the ruby keyword. You can use the ruby keyword of your app’s Gemfile to specify a particular version of Ruby. source " ruby "1.9.3" Why aren't you using git-flow? Vincent Driessen's branching model is a git branching and release management strategy that helps developers keep track of features, hotfixes and releases in bigger software projects. This workflow has lot of commands to type and remember, though, so there's also the git-flow library of git subcommands that helps automate some parts of the flow to make working with it a lot easier. After installing git-flow (brew install git-flow), you can start using git-flow in your repository by using it's init command.

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