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Synonyms for the 96 most commonly used words in English

Amazing — incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger — enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry — mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer — reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Ask– — question, inquire of, seek information from, put a question to, demand, request, expect, inquire, query, interrogate, examine, quiz Awful — dreadful, terrible, abominable, bad, poor, unpleasant Beautiful — pretty, lovely, handsome, attractive, gorgeous, dazzling, splendid, magnificent, comely, fair, ravishing, graceful, elegant, fine, exquisite, aesthetic, pleasing, shapely, delicate, stunning, glorious, heavenly, resplendent, radiant, glowing, blooming, sparkling Begin — start, open, launch, initiate, commence, inaugurate, originate Break — fracture, rupture, shatter, smash, wreck, crash, demolish, atomize Come — approach, advance, near, arrive, reach Image courtesy:

https://justenglish.me/2014/04/18/synonyms-for-the-96-most-commonly-used-words-in-english/

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English: what you need to know about the language english, english language, english lingusitics, english as a second language, english as a foreign language, english as the world What are the world's most widely spoken languages?In which countries is English the language spoken by the majority as a first language? 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Writers Write is your one-stop resource for writers. Use these 45 ways to avoid using the word ‘very’ to improve your writing. Good writers avoid peppering their writing with qualifiers like ‘very’ and ‘really’. They are known as padding or filler words and generally add little to your writing. According to Collins Dictionary: ‘Padding is unnecessary words or information used to make a piece of writing or a speech longer.

6 Ways to Create Riveting Conflict in Your Story Who says conflict is a bad thing? Who says world peace is the most important goal of humanity? Who says arguing with your little brother when you’re a kid means you’ll grow up to be an ill-mannered ruffian? Not a writer, that’s for sure! Arguably, the single most important tenet of fiction can be summed up in the saw “no conflict, no story.” You can break every rule in the book (pun intended) and still have a whopper of a tale—so long as you remember to throw a dash of conflict in your story. 12 Horrible Gobbledygook Words We Reluctantly Accepted Just as there is nothing certain in this world but death and taxes, there is nothing certain in language but that it will change, and that people will react badly. One of the changes people find most offensive is the spread of professional jargon that has been coined to replace simpler, clearer words we already have. Anyone up for some collaborative incentivizing going forward? No? Well, maybe one day your great-grandchildren will be. Here are 12 words that people once thought were horrible gobbledygook that nobody flinches at anymore.

TeachingEnglish In this lesson students practise word building in preparation for part 3 of the Use of English test in the FCE exam. Through a series of activities students will become more aware of word ‘families’, enabling them to do the Use of English (part 3) more successfully. Topic: Weird museums - word building for FCE Use of English part 3 Level: B2 Aims: To remind students how to form new words from a ‘stem’ word.To familiarise students with part 3 of the Use of English test of the FCE exam.To extend students’ vocabulary by practising forming new words from stem words.

102 Resources for Fiction Writing « Here to Create UPDATE 1/10: Dead links removed, new links added, as well as Revision and Tools and Software sections. Are you still stuck for ideas for National Novel Writing Month? Or are you working on a novel at a more leisurely pace? Here are 102 resources on Character, Point of View, Dialogue, Plot, Conflict, Structure, Outlining, Setting, and World Building, plus some links to generate Ideas and Inspiration. British Accents and Dialects Wikimedia The United Kingdom is perhaps the most dialect-obsessed country in the world. With near-countless regional Englishes shaped by millennia of history, few nations boast as many varieties of language in such a compact geography. (NOTE: This page uses the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).

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OneLook Reverse Dictionary <div id="needs_javascript"><center><b>Note: The new Reverse Dictionary requires JavaScript.</b><br /><img src="/img/a.gif?q=omg_a_user_without_js"> If you have disabled JavaScript in your browser, please <a href=" it for this site</a> or use the <a href="/?w=entersearchhere&loc=revfp_legacy">old version of the reverse dictionary</a> here.</p><p></center><div> British Slang If you’re planning on visiting London in the future, you might just want to familiarise yourself with some British Slang expressions that are very commonly used by the British. They will be very useful particularly if you’re likely to be socialising with Londoners. 1. “Mind The Gap” This famous expression is always used on trains and the London Underground (Tube).

Suffixes Word Formation Game Suffixes Word Formation: Practice suffixes word formation by playing this interactive ESL board game. Prefixes, suffixes and root words are great skills to learn. Students with good skills will most often be able to guess the meanings of unfamiliar words by breaking down the words using these skills. Choose whether to practice suffixes word formation by navigating a treacherous galaxy filled with green monsters, a sea filled with pirates or a river filled with crocodiles. Either way this will keep your heart pounding.

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