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Synonyms for the 96 most commonly used words in English

Amazing — incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger — enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry — mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer — reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Ask– — question, inquire of, seek information from, put a question to, demand, request, expect, inquire, query, interrogate, examine, quiz Awful — dreadful, terrible, abominable, bad, poor, unpleasant Beautiful — pretty, lovely, handsome, attractive, gorgeous, dazzling, splendid, magnificent, comely, fair, ravishing, graceful, elegant, fine, exquisite, aesthetic, pleasing, shapely, delicate, stunning, glorious, heavenly, resplendent, radiant, glowing, blooming, sparkling Begin — start, open, launch, initiate, commence, inaugurate, originate Break — fracture, rupture, shatter, smash, wreck, crash, demolish, atomize Come — approach, advance, near, arrive, reach Image courtesy:

https://justenglish.me/2014/04/18/synonyms-for-the-96-most-commonly-used-words-in-english/

Related:  Learn to speak englishVOCABULARYLanguage UsevocabularyEnglish language

Welcome to the English for Uni Website! This free website is for teachers and learners of English as an additional language, from intermediate levels upwards (i.e. approximately IELTS 6 and above). The site aims to make difficult grammar and academic writing concepts easier to understand. Please use this site as often as you like. You can also download all the explanations and exercises in pdf format. The site has a Creative Commons license, which means that anyone can use the materials anywhere in the world. On this site you can learn more about:

7 Word Formation Games Fun classroom activities for prefixes and suffixes, especially useful for FCE, CAE and other exam classes. Word formation is the addition of affixes like -ly and semi- to make longer words and different kinds of speech. Although it is often included in EFL exams and higher-level textbooks, it still probably gets just a few percent of the attention of lists of similar vocabulary, let alone tenses. Perhaps one reason for that is the lack of fun things you can do with it, something that this article seeks to start redressing.

Connectors Connector Diagnostic: identify specific points that need review Quiz 1: beginning – intermediate Quiz 2: intermediate – advanced Overview of Coordinators, Subordinators & Prepositional Heads 600 Other Ways To Say Common Things: Improving Student Vocabulary - Your students are bright, but they don’t always sound like it. Their diction is full of cliche and emaciated language that doesn’t reflect their inner voice, nor does it indicate their vocabulary level. You want your students to use specific language that demonstrates intended meaning rather than the first word that popped into their head, but you want to do more than hand them a thesaurus and tell them to “figure it out.” While the following graphics aren’t going to make that happen, they can certainly play a role if posted to your classroom blog, shared on a student-teacher pinterest page, hung on a classroom wall, or reformatted, printed, hole-punched, and stored in a student binder.

English: what you need to know about the language english, english language, english lingusitics, english as a second language, english as a foreign language, english as the world What are the world's most widely spoken languages?In which countries is English the language spoken by the majority as a first language? How to End an Email You’ve worked to make your email clear, and you’ve carefully edited to streamline your writing. The body of your email might well be perfect, but it can all go awry if you use the wrong sign-off. It’s just a word or a short phrase, followed by your signature, and yet finding the right tone to close your email often requires a surprising amount of thought and finesse. When you’re struggling with how to end an email, it’s best to consider the context. What works for a friend or close colleague won’t work in a strictly professional correspondence with a distant acquaintance or someone you’ve never met before.

Character and Personality Adjectives - Tasks Here you can find the list of adjectives that describe character and personality Look at the following words which are used to describe a person’s character. Make two columns of positive and negative ones of them: No one could see the colour blue until modern times This isn’t another story about that dress, or at least, not really. It’s about the way that humans see the world, and how until we have a way to describe something, even something so fundamental as a colour, we may not even notice that it’s there. Until relatively recently in human history, “blue” didn’t exist. As the delightful Radiolab episode “Colours” describes, ancient languages didn’t have a word for blue — not Greek, not Chinese, not Japanese, not Hebrew.

Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed American Slang Dictionary A dictionary that explains commonly used American slang words can be a very useful resource for anyone interested in learning more about how language continues to evolve throughout the United States. YourDictionary includes definitions of the most common of these slang words and provides additional usage information in various slang articles. About Slang in Popular Culture Slang is defined as a casual type of language that is playful or trendy. It consists both of coined words and phrases and of new or extended meanings attached to established terms.

Explaining English Grammar Acknowledgments Preface 1 Introduction Overview Basic Forms - On terminology - On being ungrammatical - On good English Basic meanings - 'I am more interesting in English Grammar' - Why can I say 'I shot the sheriff', but not *'I smiled the sheriff'? - Linguistic distance Meanings in context - Discussion topics and projects - Teaching ideas - Further reading 2 Articles Overview Basic forms - An article machine Basic meanings - Countability - Singular or plural? Tasks for Building Vocabulary - ELT Connect Hands up who has stayed up all hours of the night, pacing the room, cramming for an exam the following morning to regurgitate all that had been ‘learned’ the night before! Long-winded quotes, citations, names and dates, formulas that you didn’t know what to do with, but had a clear visual of what it should look like? We’ve all been there! I’d like to say we have all moved on from ‘learn the list of regular verbs on page 54 and you’ll be tested tomorrow’ and as teachers, I think we have, but how do we know how our students learn when they are left to their own devices?

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