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Want to speak better than 90% of native English speakers? Then learn to pronounce every word here!

Want to speak better than 90% of native English speakers? Then learn to pronounce every word here!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5myI9TDFDw

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Synonyms for the 96 most commonly used words in English Amazing — incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger — enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry — mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed

Using poems to develop productive skills This is a great motivator. Poems are often rich in cultural references, and they present a wide range of learning opportunities. For me, the aim is to teach English through poetry, not to teach the poetry itself, so you don't need to be a literature expert. Most of the tried and tested activities used regularly by language teachers can be adapted easily to bring poetry into the classroom. Communicative speaking activities Working on pronunciation Writing activities Some pros and cons Conclusion Pronunciation: 3 Principles On How To Make Your Spoken English Sound More Natural – A Guest Post I recently had the privilege and honour of being interviewed by my fellow English Language trainer, Elena Mutonono on her recent webinar “Accent Training for Business People“. For those of you who didn’t sign up for the webinar, here’s the recording. In that webinar we discussed the benefits of accent training for non-native business people and how accent training improves communication. I asked Elena, a pronunciation expert, to write a guest post for me to share her three tips on how you can make your spoken English sound more natural. I am delighted to pass the baton over to Elena for this week’s post.

Welcome to the English for Uni Website! This free website is for teachers and learners of English as an additional language, from intermediate levels upwards (i.e. approximately IELTS 6 and above). The site aims to make difficult grammar and academic writing concepts easier to understand. Please use this site as often as you like. You can also download all the explanations and exercises in pdf format. The site has a Creative Commons license, which means that anyone can use the materials anywhere in the world.

National Poetry Month April is National Poetry Month, 30 days of celebrating the joy, expressiveness, and pure delight of poetry. Learn more about the National Poetry Month, get to know some of our most well-loved children's poets in our video interview series, browse the many online resources listed here, and visit your local library or bookstore to discover wonderful new books and anthologies. Poets on poetry Listen in as acclaimed children's writers like Marilyn Singer, Ashley Bryan, Jack Prelutsky, Mary Ann Hoberman, Nikki Grimes, and Janet Wong talk about reading poetry aloud and writing poetry. National Poetry Month resources

10 English words that are difficult to pronounce When you learn a foreign language, there are always certain sounds that are a challenge to get right and certain words that you must struggle to get your tongue around. With English, the erratic spelling system means that even if you have no trouble with the sounds themselves, you may often mispronounce words anyway. To help you out with some of the trickier and more readily-confused ones, here are 10 English words that are difficult to pronounce for learners and some tips for getting them right.

How to End an Email You’ve worked to make your email clear, and you’ve carefully edited to streamline your writing. The body of your email might well be perfect, but it can all go awry if you use the wrong sign-off. It’s just a word or a short phrase, followed by your signature, and yet finding the right tone to close your email often requires a surprising amount of thought and finesse. When you’re struggling with how to end an email, it’s best to consider the context.

The art of the metaphor - Jane Hirshfield To explore metaphors more fully on your own, there are three directions you can go. The first is simply to start noticing whenever you meet one. Jane Hirshfield slipped metaphors into many of the things she said in this lesson. You might listen to it again and make a list of some of the metaphors she used along the way, without pointing out that they were metaphors. Then go to any random web blog or newspaper or magazine article and just start reading until you’ve found a half dozen metaphors. Sometimes there will be many right away, other times there could be none at all. Explaining English Grammar Acknowledgments Preface 1 Introduction Overview Basic Forms - On terminology - On being ungrammatical - On good English Basic meanings - 'I am more interesting in English Grammar' - Why can I say 'I shot the sheriff', but not *'I smiled the sheriff'? - Linguistic distance Meanings in context - Discussion topics and projects - Teaching ideas - Further reading

Barbaric Yawp in the 21st Century: Using Tech to Engage Budding Poets What if Dead Poets Society were set in modern times? Would Mr. Keating (Robin Williams' character) tweet Walt Whitman? I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world. #significantquote #carpediem Would the students have created a Facebook group rather than sneak off to a cave?

33 ways to speak better English If you’re reading this, I imagine you want to communicate with confidence and competence in English. When we communicate effectively we are able to express our ideas and opinions, share experiences, and build relationships with others. When we struggle to express ourselves, we feel unvalued and insecure. As human beings, we want to participate in group discussions and have an impact on the society around us. In the modern world, we communicate across borders. (Re)Creating Poets: How to Teach Poetry in the Classroom The wonderful poet Naomi Shihab Nye first introduced me to William Stafford's idea that no one becomes a poet. She says that we are all born poets, and it's just that some of us choose to keep up the habit. At times, all of us inevitably get stuck viewing ourselves in static and limiting ways.

Learning Resources “My beard grows to my toes, I never wear no clothes, I wraps my hair Around my bare, And down the road I goes.” – “My Beard” Where the Sidewalk Ends “Needles and pins, Needles and pins, Sew me a sail To catch me the wind.” – from “Needles and Pins” Falling Up “Millie McDeevit screamed a scream So loud it made her eyebrows steam.” – from “Screamin’ Millie” Falling Up “I will not play at tug o’ war. I’d rather play at hug o’ war” – from “Hug O’ War” Where the Sidewalk Ends “If you are a dreamer, come in.” – from “Invitation” Where the Sidewalk Ends “Anything can happen, child, ANYTHING can be.” – from “Listen to the Mustn’ts" Where the Sidewalk Ends “Balancing my ABCs Takes from noon to half past three. I don’t have time to grab a T Or even stop to take a P.” – “Alphabalance” Falling Up “Last night I had a crazy dream That I was teachin’ school.

Writing Poetry with English Language Learners Home > ELL Topics from A to Z > Writing Poetry with English Language Learners By: Kristina Robertson (2009) I Have to Write a Poem for Class By Jack PrelutskyI have to write a poem for class But don't think I'll succeed, I know I don't know all the words That I am going to need. I cannot quite imagine How my poem's supposed to be — I've got a sinking feeling I'm not good at poetry.My poem must have a meter And it also has to rhyme, It's due tomorrow morning… How I wish I had more time! I do not think that I can write A poem the way I should — But look…this is a poem right here, And it is pretty good. Writing poetry is a great exercise for English language learners.

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