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PhET: Free online physics, chemistry, biology, earth science and math simulations

https://phet.colorado.edu/

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Standardized Tests 14 September, 2014 Photo Credit: Alberto G., via Flickr Voice 1 Welcome to Spotlight. I’m Ryan Geertsma. My Molecularium - Get the App for your mobile device! "Angry birds meets nanoscience, with this sling-shot style molecule building game...This is a fun game that is well worth the download." - Children's Technology Review My Molecularium is a fun and challenging molecule building game.Launch atoms at target bond sites to assemble essential molecules of increasing complexity and difficulty. Move your device to direct your shots using our innovative laser-guided aim. Learn to use the chemical and structural formulas to help you build a wide range of important molecules, from water and vitamin C to caffeine and adrenaline. Have fun learning about molecules as you play. Nominated for Best Mobile Game App of 2017 by The Best Mobile App Awards

Scientist Peyton Robertson has 3 patents pending. He is also 12. When 12-year-old Peyton Robertson sees a problem, he is going to fix it. So when the young scientist noticed a perennial problem in his hometown of Fort Lauderdale, Florida –flooding during the region’s nasty hurricane season – he set to work building a better sandbag. Peyton’s sandbag contains an expandable polymer that’s lightweight and easy to transport when dry, but that becomes a dense solution to hold bags firmly in place when it’s wet. He also added a dash of salt – an addition that makes the solution in the bags heavier than approaching seawater. Deep Time : A History of the Earth - Interactive Infographic Life on the planet started astonishingly early. The first living organisms, in the current model of evolution, are thought to be Prokaryotes1. The oldest known fossilised prokaryotes have been dated to approximately 3.5 billion years ago, only 1 billion years after the formation of the Earth's crust. Eukaryotes2 are more advanced organisms with complex cell structures, each of which contains a nucleus. Although incredibly hard to determine their origin, they are thought to have developed 1.6–2.1 billion years ago, although some research2 suggests eukaryotes being present even earlier than this. Around 1.1 billion years ago multicellular3 organisms are thought to have started to develop, most likely similar in form to plants such as green algae. 200 million years later true multicellularity had also evolved in animals similar in nature to today's sponges, which are organisms which can reassemble themselves.

Play CellCraft, a free online game on Kongregate Check your security settings Connection issues are typically caused by security settings on your network or computer. Check that your firewall or router has port 5222 open and allowing traffic. If you are on a school or office network, you may need to contact your network administrator to make the necessary changes. Lesson Plan: Updating Orwell's '1984' Overview | How does George Orwell’s vision of technology and its uses in “1984” compare with today’s reality? How have concerns about privacy and freedom expressed in the novel been manifested in the contemporary world? In this lesson, students compare and contrast the world, people and technologies of “1984” with those of today and create a treatment for a modern film, print or stage adaptation that revolves around current technologies. Materials | Full text of “1984,” computers with Internet access, software for podcasting and projection equipment, copies of the handout “1984” vs. Today (PDF), video cameras and film-editing software (optional) Warm-Up | Give students the following list of words from “1984”:

Virtual and Interactive Resources for Science Teachers Virtual labs have come a long way in recent years. While nothing compares to completing a hands-on lab in an actual science classroom, sometimes it isn't possible. Cost and access to equipment are possible obstacles. Other barriers include location. As more classes are being offered online, it necessary for students to complete activities in virtual environments.PhET- This website, from the University of Colorado, has been around for over 15 years.

Required watching for any TED speaker: The science of stage fright One thing can strike fear into the heart of the fiercest warrior, the most powerful CEO and the smartest person in any given room: having to speak in public. The thought of it makes the palms sweat, the heart beat faster and the limbs start to shake. An estimated 75% of people have a fear of speaking in public, and it’s something that nearly everyone who takes the TED stage must work hard to overcome. This TED-Ed lesson, the science of stage fright, just might help. In the lesson — which is taught by educator Mikael Cho and directed by animator Robertino Zambrano of KAPWA Studioworks — looks at stage fright not as an emotion, but as a physiological response.

Magnifying the Universe Embed this infographic on your site! <iframe width="500" height="323" scrolling="no" src=" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br />Copyright 2012. <a href=" the Universe</a> by <a href=" Sleuth</a>. The above is an interactive infographic. If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system Mercury Venus Earth You Are Here

50 Fab Apps for Teachers Less Is More You don’t need a one-to-one classroom (one device for every student) to integrate tablets into instruction. Whether you have one tablet or five, possibilities for teaching with them abound. Single Tablet • Independent reading Load up your tablet with books in a reading app. Allow students to check out the tablet for the day or week for in-class use, just as they would a book from the class library. Have students sign a contract that they’ll handle the tablet properly.

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