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Permaculture

Permaculture
Permaculture is a system of agricultural and social design principles centered on simulating or directly utilizing the patterns and features observed in natural ecosystems. The term permaculture (as a systematic method) was first coined by David Holmgren, then a graduate student, and his professor, Bill Mollison, in 1978. The word permaculture originally referred to "permanent agriculture", but was expanded to stand also for "permanent culture", as it was understood that social aspects were integral to a truly sustainable system as inspired by Masanobu Fukuoka’s natural farming philosophy. It has many branches that include but are not limited to ecological design, ecological engineering, environmental design, construction and integrated water resources management that develops sustainable architecture, regenerative and self-maintained habitat and agricultural systems modeled from natural ecosystems.[3] History[edit] Core tenets and principles of design[edit] Theory[edit] Layers[edit] Zone 0

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permaculture

Related:  PermacultureecosystemsPermaculture AgroforestryPermaculturePermaculture

biotic and abiotic As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Forest farming Forest farming is the cultivation of high-value specialty crops under a forest canopy that is intentionally modified or maintained to provide shade levels and habitat that favor growth and enhance production levels. Forest farming encompasses a range of cultivated systems from introducing plants into the understory of a timber stand to modifying forest stands to enhance the marketability and sustainable production of existing plants.[1] Forest farming is a type of agroforestry practice characterized by the "four I's": intentional, integrated, intensive and interactive.[2] Agroforestry is a land management system that combines trees with crops or livestock, or both, on the same piece of land. It focuses on increasing benefits to the landowner as well as maintaining forest integrity and environmental health. The practice involves cultivating non-timber forest products or niche crops, some of which, such as ginseng or shiitake mushrooms, can have high market value.

How to make a bamboo polytunnel We used a local renewable material, caña (like bamboo). You could use anything long and bendy – we would like to try it with hazel next time we are further north. The only items we paid for are the plastic and string (pita string made from fibres of the giant succulent Agave plant). It took six days with four people working. It's a lovely material to work with, flexible, strong and graceful. Permaculture - PermaWiki Permaculture is a design system which aims to create sustainable human habitats by following nature's patterns. The word 'permaculture', coined by Australians Bill Mollison and David Holmgren during the 1970s, is derived as a contraction of permanent agriculture, or permanent culture. The idea of permaculture is considered among the most significant innovations developed by Australians in the century since Australian federation [1]. However like "nature", the permaculture concept evolves with time making its definition difficult. For example, consider the words of Bill Mollison,

Ecosystems We're All in This Together Everything in the natural world is connected. An ecosystem is a community of living and non-living things that work together. Ecosystems have no particular size. An ecosystem can be as large as a desert or a lake or as small as a tree or a puddle. Agroecology Agroecology is the study of ecological processes that operate in agricultural production systems. The prefix agro- refers to agriculture. Bringing ecological principles to bear in agroecosystems can suggest novel management approaches that would not otherwise be considered.

Recycling animal and human dung is the key to sustainable farming © Illustrations in red & black: Diego Marmolejo for low-tech magazine. The innocent looking water closet breaks up a natural cycle in our food supply. Basically, it turns extremely valuable resources into waste products. When we grow crops, we withdraw essential nutrients from the soil: potassium, nitrogen and phosphate, to name but the most important. Gaia Theory The Gaia Paradigm While reading on about the science of Gaia Theory – below and throughout this website – consider the term “Gaia Paradigm.” This phrase refers to the confluence of the best available scientific understanding of Earth as a living system with cultural understandings of human society as a seamless continuum of that system.

Experiments Below are interactive experiments that can be used to teach all ages about the art and science of space-based remote sensing. The experiments focus on how NASA uses remote sensing to study how and why the Earth changes. Mission: Biomes The following two activities are designed for teachers to use in classrooms as supplementary, interdisciplinary units.

DIY $2 self-watering garden bed - Grow produce easily, even in the toughest drought conditions - NaturalNews.com Thursday, June 26, 2014 by: Carolanne WrightTags: self-watering garden bed, sustainable agriculture, drought conditions (NaturalNews) "When life gives you lemons, share them with neighbors!" enthuses the Food is Free Project, a grassroots organization based out of Austin, Texas. The project isn't advocating sharing bad luck; instead, it's championing the idea of connecting neighbors and communities with a bounty of free, homegrown fresh produce.

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