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Makerspace Starter Kit

Makerspace Starter Kit
The hot new Makerspace Movement is NOT new to Murray Hill Middle School. Eighteen years ago we designed and opened the school with the idea that we would have creation labs in the Media Center, GT room, and the TV studio. We started with video production, iMovie, Specular LogoMotion, Hyperstudio, and animation with Hollyood High kids. Here's an example of an EARLY (2003) video production called Bookfellas, featuring some Guy Ritchie-esque film direction techniques. These kids are now all grown up and we've kept evolving, too! It's OK to Start Small! I re-purposed some of my empty study carrels for this Makerspace center at the top corner of our library. As I asserted in a recent blog post about new Ed Tech trends, fads, & tech -you can start small and You Don't Have to Marry It! For the Duct Tape Craft Cubby, I used a spring loaded curtain rod to hold the duct tape rolls, bought a bright blue colored shower caddy for the scissors and other tools. Amazon Delivers! FUND Me!

http://www.thedaringlibrarian.com/2015/06/makerspace-starter-kit.html

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Getting REaL In The Library R-Reflect, Revise, Reinvent E-Evaluate, Energize, Expectations and L-Listen, Lead, Love, Laughter This year I returned to the high school library full of ideas gathered from my PLN (Professional Learning Network) I hoped to implement. Mobile Maker Spaces The production cart includes a tripod with iPad Pro mount, a piano keyboard, professional lighting, mics, headphones, and various items to help students produce movies, videos, and podcasts. The concept was pretty straightforward, but the logistics were a bit complicated. We wanted to create four mobile maker space carts that could rotate among four middle school libraries in the Knox County School district of Knoxville, TN.

The True Adventures of a High School Librarian: JCHS MakerSpace a Go Go! The adventure of creating a MakerSpace in the James Clemens High School library has taken off with a lot of help from my friends! Once my principal, Dr. Brian Clayton, approached me about bringing a MakerSpace to the JCHS Library this year the first thing I did was crowd source my amazing PLN for ideas and resources. How Libraries Are Becoming Modern Makerspaces If you could ask Ben Franklin what public institution he would like to visit in America today, I bet he would say the public library. And if you asked him which part of the library, I bet he would say the makerspace. Ben Franklin is well known as a founder of the early subscription library, the Philadelphia Library Company, almost 300 years ago. It may be less well known that Franklin used the library’s space for some of his early experiments with electricity. Today, perhaps taking a cue from Franklin, libraries across America are creating space for their patrons to experiment with all kinds of new technologies and tools to create and invent.

How a School Library Increased Student Use by 1,000 Percent Listen to the full interview: Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 51:45 — 71.4MB) Subscribe: iTunes | Android | Meet Debbie Sterling - GoldieBlox founder At GoldieBlox, our goal is to get girls building. We’re here to help level the playing field in every sense of the phrase. By tapping into girls' strong verbal skills, our story + construction set bolsters confidence in spatial skills while giving young inventors the tools they need to build and create amazing things. In a world where men largely outnumber women in science, technology, engineering and math, girls lose interest in these subjects as early as age 8. Construction toys develop an early interest in these subjects, but for over a hundred years, they've been considered "boys' toys.” GoldieBlox is determined to change the equation.

6 Fun Ways Kids Can Join the Maker Movement Children are natural makers — give a kid a cardboard box, and she’ll transform it immediately into an oven, a spaceship, an elevator, or something else that I probably cannot imagine. Recent years have seen a growth of the maker movement, or an enthusiasm for inventing and creating new technologies and tools, in the U.S., Europe, and many countries across the world. Here is a look at the origins of the maker movement, how it fosters creativity, and some of the resources available to kids. How the Maker Movement Got Started The maker movement has its origins in the do-it-yourself (DIY) attitude. Dale Dougherty is credited with having started the movement with the launch of Make: magazine in 2005.

Makerspace Starter Kit Makerspace Starter Kit Congratulations! You are now the proud owner of a Makerspace. The Makerspace Starter Kit includes:Makerspace Welcome Letter (pdf)Makerspace Starter Kit (pdf)Mini Maker Notebook (pdf) If the links above don’t work , please try these alternate Dropbox Download Links: Makerspace Welcome Letter, Makerspace Starter Kit, MiniMaker Notebook. Directions: Please read the Makerspace Welcome Letter then download and print the Makerspace Starter Kit (pdf) and the Mini Maker Notebook.

How to Run an AWESOME After-school Makers Club When I first started up my makerspace at Stewart, I knew that getting students in there after school would be the ideal time to really dive deep into projects and develop a community of makers. During those first six months, my school didn’t have afterschool clubs but was piloting during school clubs with 6th graders, so we had a small but mighty K’nex Club where we had tons of fun. This gave me a chance to experiment with what running a club was like, and it gave me a lot of ideas for how an afterschool club could work. The next school year, my school started supporting afterschool clubs. We had a small program with about ten students. Being a magnet school, our students come from all over the county, and it can be difficult to get students to stay after-school.

The Flipped Learning Process Visually Explained April 2, 2015 After yesterday’s post on “Flipped Learning Resources” one of our readers emailed us this beautiful visual outlining the six main steps involved in the creation of a flipped classroom. These steps include: planning, recording, sharing, changing, grouping, and regrouping. Read the graphic for more details on each of these steps.

Andy Plemmons - Athens, Ga, School Library Media Specialist, EdS, MED, and BSED from the University of Georgia I am the school library media specialist at David C. Barrow Elementary in Athens, GA and a Google Certified Teacher. My library program is grounded in transliteracy, participatory culture, and students as creators of content shared with the global community. My students are often seen skyping with authors, guest speakers, and the developers of the tools that they use in class. I also collaborate with libraries around the country. I have presented at numerous conferences including the School Library Journal Leadership Summit, American Association of School Librarians Conference, Georgia Educational Technology Conference, and the Texas Library Association Conference. A Librarian's Guide to Makerspaces: 16 Resources Makerspaces, sometimes also referred to as hackerspaces, hackspaces, and fablabs are creative, DIY spaces where people can gather to create, invent, and learn. In libraries they often have 3D printers, software, electronics, craft and hardware supplies and tools, and more. Here are some excellent resources for anyone thinking about setting up a makerspace in their organization.

Arduino + Chromebook With over 5 Million units sold in 2014 alone, Chromebooks are a growing trend among schools and homes. One of the biggest drawbacks to Chromebooks has been the inability to connect it to any hardware (i.e. Arduino) -- until now. Favorited Favorite 2 Where EdTech meets TechEd MAKE STEAM: Giving Maker Education Some Context As an experiential educator who has fully embraced technology as a means for allowing and facilitating learner voice, creativity, innovation, inventiveness, the Maker Education movement fits into my vision about what a good education entails. I have been blogging and presenting about Maker Education – see But recent discussions with other educators and administrators made me realize that the idea of maker education is often vague and seems unrealistic in terms of regular classroom instruction. As such, in the future, I am going to associate and discuss Maker Education in the context S.T.E.A.M. – science, technology, engineering, arts (including language arts), math, hopefully, encouraging regular classroom teachers to integrate maker education projects into their classrooms. What follows are some resources and articles I compiled to provide educators as part of this discussion. Link to Thinglink that contains links to the following resources – Like this:

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