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Linking words/Connectors

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Linking words. Linking words help you to connect ideas and sentences when you speak or write English.

Linking words

We can use linking words to give examples, add information, summarise, sequence information, give a reason or result, or to contrast ideas. Here's a list of the most common linking words and phrases: Giving examples For exampleFor instanceNamely The most common way of giving examples is by using for example or for instance. Namely refers to something by name. " Adding information AndIn additionAs well asAlsoTooFurthermoreMoreoverApart fromIn addition toBesides Ideas are often linked by and. "We discussed training, education and the budget. " You can use also with not only to give emphasis. " We don't usually start a sentence with also. As well as can be used at the beginning or the middle of a sentence. " Too goes either at the end of the sentence, or after the subject and means as well. " Apart from and besides are often used to mean as well as, or in addition to.

" Summarising Sequencing ideas Giving a reason. Linking Words — A complete List of English Connecting Words. Linking & Connecting Words It is essential to understand how Linking Words, as a part of speech, can be used to combine ideas in writing - and thus ensure that ideas within sentences and paragraphs are elegantly connected - for the benefit of the reader.

Linking Words — A complete List of English Connecting Words

This will help to improve your writing (e.g. essay, comment, summary (scientific) review, (research) paper, letter, abstract, report, thesis, etc.). It is also fundamental to be aware of the sometimes subtle meaning of these "small" words within the English language. "Linking Words" is used as a term to denote a class of English words which are employed to link or connect parts of speech or even whole sentences. They are also called connecting words. Conjunctions and Transition Words Relations Between Words A concept is an idea - and what is an idea? So, a concept can be expressed as something between a single word, and an elaborate and in extenso described philosophy. Cohesion: linking words and phrases. 1.33 Cohesion: linking words and phrases You can use words or short phrases which help to guide your reader through your writing, and to link sentences, paragraphs and sections both forwards and backwards.

Cohesion: linking words and phrases

Good use will make what you have written easy to follow; bad use might mean your style is disjointed, probably with too many short sentences, and consequently difficult to follow. Your mark could be affected either way. The best way to "get a feel" for these words is through your reading. Most textbooks and articles are well-written and will probably include a lot of these cohesive devices. Don't forget "AND"! There follows a list of words and phrases that can be used.

Here are just a few examples of some of the words in action: Desktop computers are cheaper and more reliable than laptops; furthermore, they are more flexible. Prices fell by more than 20% last year. On the whole, his speech was well received, despite some complaints from new members. Top of page Transition word exercise. Linkers and connectors - English Subject Area. Contrast .

Linkers and connectors - English Subject Area

In spite of / Despite Link two contrasting ideas. Followed by a noun phrase. . Although / (Even) though Link two contrasting ideas. . . . . Reason and cause . . Purpose . . Consequence . . . Addition . . . For example / For instance Introduces an example referring to previously stated ideas. . . but / yet: followed by a noun phrase or a sentence. ‘The book is short but / yet interesting’ . in spite of / despite: It is placed at the beginning or in the middle of the sentence.

‘He arrived on time despite / in spite of getting up late’ although / though/ even though / in spite of the fact that: followed by a complete sentence. ‘Although / though / even though / in spite of the fact that the pupils had not studied, they all passed their exams’. . however, nevertheless, even so, on the one hand, on the other hand, on the contrary: ‘He was quite ill however/ nevertheless/ even so, he went to school’ . while, whereas ‘This film is very interesting, while/whereas that one is quite boring’ Result.

Connectors. Connector Diagnostic: identify specific points that need review Quiz 1: beginning – intermediate Quiz 2: intermediate – advanced Overview of Coordinators, Subordinators & Prepositional Heads Connector Review: overview of connective words that relate phrases and clauses Intermediate– Advanced ESL, Native Speaker.

Connectors

Linking words.