background preloader

The 8 Minutes That Matter Most

The 8 Minutes That Matter Most
I am an English teacher, so my ears perk up when writers talk about their process. I've found the advice handy for lesson planning, too. That's because both writing and planning deal with craft. In writing, you want your audience to be absorbed. You want them to care about your characters. You want them be delighted by the suspense. John Irving, the author of The Cider House Rules, begins with his last sentence: I write the last line, and then I write the line before that. That is the crux of lesson planning right there -- endings and beginnings. The eight minutes that matter most are the beginning and endings. Here are eight ways to make those eight minutes magical. Beginnings 1. YouTube reaches more 18- to 34-year-olds than any cable channel. 2. If you want to create a safe space for students to take risks, you won't get there with a pry bar. 3. Toss a football around the class before you teach the physics of a Peyton Manning spiral. 4. Endings 1. 2. 3. 4.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/8-minutes-that-matter-most-brian-sztabnik

Related:  asegelfgrenClassroom ManagementPositive EngagementBFL och annat om lärande25th grade

Shakespeare - Hamlet Hamlet, the Prince of Denmark, has come back from university to find that his father, the old king, is dead. His mother has married his father’s brother, Claudius, who is now king of Denmark. Hamlet is shocked that his mother has married so soon after his father’s death, and angry that she has married Claudius. Soon, a ghost is seen walking on the castle walls. The ghost looks like Hamlet’s father, the dead king. When Hamlet sees the ghost, he is told that it is the ghost of his father.

How to manage behaviour in the classroom Behaviour management tip 1 Get in and get out quickly with your dignity intact We know that to effectively deliver sanctions the message needs to be simple, clear and non-negotiable; in practice it is easy to get caught up in a lengthy argument or confrontation. Focus on moving in, delivering your sanction as discreetly as possible and then moving out quickly.

5 Fantastic, Fast, Formative Assessment Tools I thought I could read my students' body language. I was wrong. As an experiment, I used Socrative when I taught binary numbers. What I learned forever changed my views on being a better teacher. Why Formative Assessment Makes Better Teachers 5 Reasons to Use Mentor Texts With Big Kids - The Teacher Next Door - Creative Ideas From My Classroom To Yours When I changed grade levels from second grade to 4th/5th, one of the things I really thought I would miss was all of my wonderful picture books. I used to love to read and re-read them to the kids, to gaze at their delightful pictures, and to use them to get kids excited about the magic of reading. Over the years, I loved picture books so much that if you saw my collection, you might have wanted to nominate me for some kind of teaching hoarder show (I had that many)! When we moved across the country and my new teaching job was 4th/5th (scared the dickens out of me at that time), I thought I would have to give up my picture books, pack them into boxes, and store them in my garage. But once I realized how effective they could be with my big kids, I happily unwrapped these picture book treasures and carted them off to school.

Sir Ken Robinson's 10 most motivational quotes Sir Ken Robinson motivates those inside and outside of education with his inspiring Ted talks. Here are 10 of his best quotes. If I need my soul stirred about education and creativity, I turn to Sir Ken Robinson. He’s an internationally renowned speaker on education and creativity. He has given several phenomenal Ted talks with millions of views each. (Learn more about Sir Ken at his website or follow him on Twitter.) Mysteries VOCABULARY AROUND THE GENRE - Definitions: matching exercises - Drag and drop exercises on Criminals - Crosswords: Crime by Pascal Lapierre , ac-nantes LAMB TO THE SLAUGHTER, Roald Dahl SILENT NIGHT, Mary Higgins Clark - Bac 2003: Written Comprehension

Behavior Expectations and How to Teach Them Imagine that a student enters an English class to find that it's that most dreaded of days -- graded paper pass-back day. As he receives his paper, his teacher begins to criticize him for his mistakes saying, "You should have known better than to write your thesis that way." What if the teacher went on to add, "That's the third time this month. What am I going to do with you?" before sending him to the office for his mistake? The Key Differences Between Summative And Formative Assessments It’s not a stretch to say that assessment is a hot button issue in education; however, you’d be hard pressed to find an educator who doesn’t see the value in measuring student progress. Assessments themselves have been vilified, when, in fact, it’s why assessments are given and how the data is used that is really the issue. The Glossary of Education Reform gives this great overview of what high-stakes testing is and how it impacts students, teachers, and schools. Basically, high-stakes testing has consequences for the test-takers and givers—sometimes in the form of a high school diploma, grade advancement, and even teachers’ salaries. But not all assessment is high-stakes, and when done thoughtfully, the right assessment can provide extremely useful information for all stakeholders—students, teachers, parents, schools, and policy-makers Let’s take a look at what assessment is, why it’s important, and how it can be delivered in the classroom in a useful manner.

Related: