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Video Lesson: Mr. Bean

Video Lesson: Mr. Bean
Follow me on twitter This is a video lesson based around the video “Mr. Bean packs his suitcase” thanks to British Council for bringing it to my attention in their lesson plan on making predictions but I’ve adapted it for use in different ways with different levels. Kids and lower levels The aim of this lesson plan is to practice holiday vocabulary (clothes and items that go in a suitcase) and some basic grammar structure. Project a picture of a suitcase on to the board (or draw one) and ask “What do you put in your suitcase when you go on holiday?” toothbrushtoothpasteswimming shorts/trunkstowelunderpantscan of baked beanscloth/flannelsoapbooksuitcasetrousersshortsshoesteddy bearscissors You could also use this quizlet set to go over clothes vocabulary. If children are old enough to write, put them in pairs and hand out post-it-notes and a pencil to each pair. Mr. in his suitcase. Then stick all the post-its on the board and show the video. Higher levels – video dictations Objects: Verbs:

http://freeenglishlessonplans.com/2014/11/21/mr-bean-packing-his-suitcase/

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Film Library Film Education - Follow us on: Twitter, Facebook RSS Skip to main content Home > Resources > Film Library The Notebook This EFL lesson is designed around a beautiful short film by Greg Gray and the theme of household chores. Students learn and practise vocabulary related to household chores, talk about household chores and watch a short film. Language level: Pre-intermediate (A2)- Intermediate (B1) Learner type: Teens and adults Time: 60 minutes London Short Fiction: Mud Man Continuing our series of short fiction set in, or influenced by London. This week’s story by Melaina Barnes is the winner of our competition with the British Academy’s Literature Week to find a new modern fairy tale for London. To explore the Literature Week programme — running 11-17 May — and register for events visit the British Academy’s website. Out he comes, dredged from the canal. The narrow-boat girls pat him, tend him, talk to him. –Mate.

10 English jokes to make learning English fun. Laughter is the best medicine Jokes are an essential part of any language and culture and are a great way of understanding the target language through the play on words and a culture’s sense of humour. The English Language is filled with witty, clever jokes that illustrate the play on words such as homophones, double entendre and puns like this: Did you hear about the guy whose whole left side was cut off? He’s all right now.

Using Silent Video in the EFL Classroom This video is the BOMB! It is captivating, absorbing, a story par excellence but also SILENT! Yes, silent films are great for getting students to produce language — and after all is said and done, that most often is the hardest thing to do, getting the students speaking and learning language by just communicating. That is our job, to get the students so absorbed in the communicative act that they forget they are learning. When we forget and are not consciously fixated on the language – we learn so much more!

The Odd Life of Timothy Green The Odd Life Of Timothy Green tells the story of Cindy and Jim Green, a happily married couple who can't wait to start a family but can only dream about what their child would be like. When young Timothy shows up on their doorstep one stormy night, Cindy and Jim - and their small town of Stanleyville - learn that sometimes the unexpected can bring some of life's greatest gifts. This educational website supporting the release of The Odd Life of Timothy Green is the perfect pre-Easter classroom focus, featuring anti-bullying and re-birth themed child-friendly activities. The resource is aimed at teachers of Primary students between the ages of 7-11. The activities meet aspects of Literacy, PSHE and Citizenship and ICT. These teachers' notes outline how a project on the film can for the basis of a three week unit of work.

Four Ways to Think About Using ThingLink - Rethinking ThingLink This is a guest post from Shawn McCusker of EdTechTeacher.org, an advertiser on this site. While there are some very creative web tools out there, ThingLink is one of my favorites. It has earned this status by passing several of my key benchmark-tests for the classroom: It is dependable and accessible.Students need not fear that their work will be lost as it automatically saves.It is relatively easy to learn and use.Rarely does a lesson become more about “ThingLink” than the topic about which students are trying to express their knowledge. Use six different tenses in English Students often learn just one piece of grammar in a lesson. Most of them master that day’s subject and move on to the next. But, when the time for revision comes, they often don’t remember what they’ve learnt. For example, two weeks ago my class encountered an exercise in which several tenses were revised. First, they demanded that I re-explain the grammar and then they seemed really confused about what form they should use.

Lesson idea: quick conditionals review Here’s a quick idea for revising some conditionals. I used this the other day and it worked well: Ask students the following: What would you do if you were the last person on earth? The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2014 – Part One I use short, funny video clips a lot when I’m teaching ELLs, and you can read in detail about how I use them in The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them). In short, there are many ways to use them that promote speaking, listening, writing and reading. I’ve posted quite a few of them during the first six months of this year, and I thought it would be useful to readers — and to me — if I brought them together in one post. I’ve also published quite a few during the previous seven years of this blog. You can find those in these lists: The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2013 – Part Two

Short-Film – Learn English with videos An award-winning short movie from 2014. Brothers Julio and Marvin become restless during the reading of the Passion, and begin playfully slapping one another with palms they received upon their visit to church. Unsurprisingly, their mother is not amused with their behavior. After a brief scolding, the two simmer down only for a moment before they agree to a wager with one another: who can shout "crucify him" the loudest. Once arranged, the younger of the brothers gets overwhelmed by the experience.

Teaching Reading and Writing with Technology: Phases of the Moon For the last few weeks, I've been mentoring a fabulous student teacher. She has been gradually taking over more subject areas, and later this week, she'll be teaching everything. I really enjoy having the opportunity to work with student teachers because they bring a lot of enthusiasm to the classroom, and they often have really creative lessons. My current student teacher is no exception. June 2012 One of the most valuable things a teacher can do for students is to help them identify resources for learning outside of class. If students can make a personal—even emotional—connection to material, they will go beyond what is required in an ESOL course in their study of English because it has become enjoyable, not just necessary. I knew I hit the jackpot when students begged to watch another episode of Fox Broadcasting Company’s hit musical comedy-drama Glee. For my advanced-level college students, I had created a listening log together with pre- and postviewing classroom activities on the first episode, titled “Pilot,” which originally aired in 2009. I use the term listening log to describe a series of tasks completed individually by students outside of class while watching the episode.

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