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Video Lesson: Mr. Bean

Video Lesson: Mr. Bean
Follow me on twitter This is a video lesson based around the video “Mr. Bean packs his suitcase” thanks to British Council for bringing it to my attention in their lesson plan on making predictions but I’ve adapted it for use in different ways with different levels. Kids and lower levels The aim of this lesson plan is to practice holiday vocabulary (clothes and items that go in a suitcase) and some basic grammar structure. Project a picture of a suitcase on to the board (or draw one) and ask “What do you put in your suitcase when you go on holiday?” toothbrushtoothpasteswimming shorts/trunkstowelunderpantscan of baked beanscloth/flannelsoapbooksuitcasetrousersshortsshoesteddy bearscissors You could also use this quizlet set to go over clothes vocabulary. If children are old enough to write, put them in pairs and hand out post-it-notes and a pencil to each pair. Mr. in his suitcase. Then stick all the post-its on the board and show the video. Higher levels – video dictations Objects: Verbs:

http://freeenglishlessonplans.com/2014/11/21/mr-bean-packing-his-suitcase/

Related:  short films and video lessonsESL with technologyEnglishesterfeldmanAPRENDER INGLÉS

Improve Your English by Watching Friends – 3 Steps on How to Actively Watch TV Shows I am delighted to introduce you to Paul Mains who has written this post. Paul approached me a couple of weeks ago offering to write a piece for my blog. He offered me a choice of topics and I was immediately drawn to the above topic. Many learners watch films and follow TV series in English. However, many often feel guilty and think that they should be doing something more worthwhile to work on their English.

The Notebook This EFL lesson is designed around a beautiful short film by Greg Gray and the theme of household chores. Students learn and practise vocabulary related to household chores, talk about household chores and watch a short film. Language level: Pre-intermediate (A2)- Intermediate (B1) Learner type: Teens and adults Time: 60 minutes London Short Fiction: Mud Man Continuing our series of short fiction set in, or influenced by London. This week’s story by Melaina Barnes is the winner of our competition with the British Academy’s Literature Week to find a new modern fairy tale for London. To explore the Literature Week programme — running 11-17 May — and register for events visit the British Academy’s website. Out he comes, dredged from the canal. The narrow-boat girls pat him, tend him, talk to him. –Mate.

10 lifesaving websites for ESL teachers Lisa has asked me for some recommendations regarding useful sites for EFL teachers and I’m happy to make a little compilation of the places I visit most often to find ideas, inspirations, betimes lesson plans if I feel exceptionally lazy (The Liberation of the Garden Gnomes by Peter Vahle is just shiny!) and share them with you. So, here we go – my ten favourite websites: Inspiration from Ellen Degeneres Show: Never Have I Ever : present perfect I firmly believe that the way you present things to your students matters . From boring points of grammar to challenging speaking activities, there is always a way to get their attention. I am of the opinion that students learn much better if you completely discard from your teaching the idea of boring master classes where the only person in the room seems to be the teacher and choose instead a more interactive approach. I try hard not to forget this student -centred approach during the whole lesson . There is also something I try not to forget. You learn better when you have fun!

The Reader This EFL lesson plan is designed around a moving short film commissioned by Bells and directed by Greg Gray. In the lesson students write a narrative, watch a short film and discuss literacy strategies. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free. Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2) Learner type: All ages Time: 90 minutes

Four Ways to Think About Using ThingLink - Rethinking ThingLink This is a guest post from Shawn McCusker of EdTechTeacher.org, an advertiser on this site. While there are some very creative web tools out there, ThingLink is one of my favorites. It has earned this status by passing several of my key benchmark-tests for the classroom: It is dependable and accessible.Students need not fear that their work will be lost as it automatically saves.It is relatively easy to learn and use.Rarely does a lesson become more about “ThingLink” than the topic about which students are trying to express their knowledge. Use six different tenses in English Students often learn just one piece of grammar in a lesson. Most of them master that day’s subject and move on to the next. But, when the time for revision comes, they often don’t remember what they’ve learnt. For example, two weeks ago my class encountered an exercise in which several tenses were revised. First, they demanded that I re-explain the grammar and then they seemed really confused about what form they should use.

Reading Comprehension Worksheets "Your reading comprehension materials are the best I've found on the web. They are so thorough and comprehensive! My students and I have learned a lot from them. Thanks so much!" -- Susan B., Carter, KY. 03/21/12 Like these materials? The Giving Tree (Shel Silverstein) –[Multimedia-English videos] A story about unconditional love. Read from the original book by Shel Silverstein. THE BOY WOULD COME= The boy used to come. USED TO can express a habit or a state (a situation), but WOULD can only express a habit- I used to get up at 8 o’clock, but now I get up later = I would get up at 8 o’clock, but now I get up later.- That house used to look very old, but now they have repaired it. (a state. We can’t say: “that house would look very old”)

Teaching Reading and Writing with Technology: Phases of the Moon For the last few weeks, I've been mentoring a fabulous student teacher. She has been gradually taking over more subject areas, and later this week, she'll be teaching everything. I really enjoy having the opportunity to work with student teachers because they bring a lot of enthusiasm to the classroom, and they often have really creative lessons. My current student teacher is no exception. 25 Best Sites for Free Educational Videos RefSeek's guide to the 25 best online resources for finding free educational videos. With the exception of BrainPOP and Cosmeo, all listed sites offer their extensive video libraries for free and without registration. Academic Earth Thousands of video lectures from the world's top scholars.

Why You Should Learn English with TV Series For the majority of exceptionally fluent English speakers I meet, the most fun, enriching, and effective way to learn English is through watching TV series. In fact, it’s surprisingly common to hear that people learn significantly more English from TV, movies, and videos than all traditional methods combined (For example: English courses, textbooks, and even study abroad experiences). So why is this the case? Why is it so hard for English schools to consistently deliver on their promises, and why is it that the most fluent English learners in the world are benefiting much more from English speaking TV series, a media that was not intended to teach English? Learn 101 Common Expressions from Friends with our FREE EBook

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