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5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners
The humble question is an indispensable tool: the spade that helps us dig for truth, or the flashlight that illuminates surrounding darkness. Questioning helps us learn, explore the unknown, and adapt to change. That makes it a most precious “app” today, in a world where everything is changing and so much is unknown. And yet, we don’t seem to value questioning as much as we should. For the most part, in our workplaces as well as our classrooms, it is the answers we reward -- while the questions are barely tolerated. To change that is easier said than done. How to Encourage Questioning 1. Asking a question can be a scary step into the void. 2. This is a tough one. 3. Part of the appeal of “questions-only” exercises is that there’s an element of play involved, as in: Can you turn that answer/statement into a question? 4. 5. If the long-term goal is to create lifelong questioners, then the challenge is to make questioning a habit -- a part of the way one thinks.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/help-students-become-better-questioners-warren-berger

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How to Approach Your Teaching Like a Master Chef Listen to my interview with John Stevens and Matt Vaudrey, or read a full transcript here. Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 51:23 — 70.9MB) Subscribe: iTunes | Android | 5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. Um, I don't think she thought it was so cute. I think she was treading lightly on the ever-so shaky ego of a brand-new teacher while still giving me some very necessary feedback.

Class Discussion to Encourage Critical Thinking: Resources for Grades 9-12 About Socratic Seminars Socratic Seminars: Patience & Practice <img class="media-image media-element file-content-image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/content_image_breakpoints_theme_edutopia_desktop_1x/public/content/73/video.gif?itok=pmoQLTDv" alt="" /> (Teaching Channel, 2013) At Mountain View High School in Mountain View, California, teacher Paige Price discusses how she uses Socratic Seminars in her classroom to address the question, “What’s the purpose of poetic language?” Make sure to check out the supporting materials related to the featured activities, including scoring and student preparation guides. 20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning 20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning Recently we took at look at the phases of inquiry-based learning through a framework, and even apps that were conducive to inquiry-based learning on the iPad. During our research for the phases framework, we stumbled across the following breakdown of the inquiry process for learning on 21stcenturyhsie.weebly.com (who offer the references that appear below the graphic).

Enliven Class Discussions With Gallery Walks Students routinely talking with each other should be a staple in classrooms. We know this as teachers. Social development theory (and I’m sure plenty of your own observational data) backs up the benefits of it. Can we change the PD culture of communication? By Tom DaccordRead more by Contributor October 9th, 2014 Yet, even more striking than this large congregation of observers was the conversation that ensued afterwards. All of the observers, as well as a few additional participants, gathered in a room immediately after the class to discuss it. The principal gave a brief opening evaluation of the lesson and then asked us to critique it point-by-point. (We all received a copy of the lesson beforehand.) And critique it we did: the teacher’s stated instructional goals, her preparation, her instructional strategies, her pacing, her interactions with the students, her technology guidance, her wrap-up, and other facets of her lesson.

Critical Thinking Toolbox: How to Brainstorm Brainstorming is an essential part of critical thinking and a tool that people use to invent an idea, find a solution to a problem, or answer a question. Like: naming a puppy, or . . . Prehistoric Man: "I wonder why all the stars move around in the same way every night, except for just a few? Those few wander about from night to night." Why Understanding These Four Types of Mistakes Can Help Us Learn by Eduardo Briceño This article was first published in the Mindset Works newsletter. We can deepen our own and our students’ understanding of mistakes, which are not all created equal, and are not always desirable. After all, our ability to manage and learn from mistakes is not fixed. We can improve it. Here are two quotes about mistakes that I like and use, but that can also lead to confusion if we don’t further clarify what we mean:

7 Effective Templates For Teacher Feedback Feedback in the classroom is often one-sided: the teacher gives feedback and the student receives it, generally relating to the quality of their work. Depending on the level of the students you teach, you may find yourself subject to student evaluation, but generally that only comes once a semester (at least at the university level), and generally when the course is completed and grades are either done or almost done. When I was a teacher, some of the most useful feedback I got was from my students at the end of the semester. Often times, I would read the course evaluations and wish that the students had told me what they were thinking before so that I could tweak something, add something, quit doing something that wasn’t working, etc. Especially as a new teacher, that feedback was super helpful.

The Power of "I Don't Know" The role of teaching has evolved. No longer are we the carriers of knowledge, giving it to students and assessing if they can repeat facts successfully. We are, instead, tasked with teaching students how to find answers themselves. Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: The Do’s and Don’ts of Giving an Effective Presentation April 8, 2017 When it comes to presentations, no matter what industry you’re in, creating that first impression and providing a presentation that will win over your audience comes with its pressures. Standing in front of that audience and involving them in what you’re saying is important in the success of any presentation. If you have great content, your presentation has a great starting point for success and will help to give you confidence as a presenter. The content of your slides will set the scene of your presentation, where the words used really do matter. You also need to take into consideration all three elements of physical communication when presenting – words, tone of voice and body language. With the right preparation and the right attitude, you can channel your nerves and improve your confidence.

10 Smart Tools For Digital Exit Slips Snapshots Of Understanding? 10 Smart Tools For Digital Exit Slips by Ryan Schaaf, Assistant Professor of Technology, Notre Dame of Maryland University Do they get it? After an instructional lesson is over, educators are left with a classroom full of students looking at them. 20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching - 20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching by TeachThought Staff What makes an effective teacher? Or more specifically, what observable characteristics might you see and hear? The University of Minnesota offered some observable characteristics of effective teaching which, while focused on teacher actions rather than student learning, had some useful tips–not so much how to teach generally, but specific actions that you can use tomorrow. In “How A Good Teacher Becomes Great,” we theorized that good teachers “know which assessments are for “show,” and which are for “go”—that is, which look good from 10 feet, and which provide visibility for both the student and teacher where the learning needs to go next,” and that they model curiosity, collaborate with other great teachers, and “measure understanding in diverse ways.”

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