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How to Teach Without a Lecture and other fun

How to Teach Without a Lecture and other fun

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Tired of Teaching “Elements of Plot”? A New, Fun Approach! Are you tired of beginning each school year with the same ol’ “Elements of Plot” lesson? The initial vocabulary and concepts related to “Plot” can be kind of “dry” and “boring”, especially if you’re a student in grades 7th-10th! You know what I’m talking about because we’ve all been there ;) I took some time (well, quite a bit of time!) designing a new way to introduce the “elements of plot” to my ninth grade English students! Instead of using the original “Plot Mountain” (pictured below) – I decided to take my students on “Plot Roller Coaster Ride”!

Discover the Learner in Every Child Collaborative Blog Series on Learner Agency with the Institute for Personalized Learning For too long, schools have identified who the learner is and how they learn using learning styles. Some learners are labeled based on their disability. We ask you to open a new door and consider using the neurosciences to understand how learners learn best so you can discover the learner in every child. “If you remove the veil of disability, you can see the learner.” Kathleen McClaskey Teaching Village Hi! I’m Barbara Hoskins Sakamoto. I’m an English teacher currently living in Kitakyushu, Japan. I’ve taught English as a Second or Foreign Language (ESL/EFL) for a little more than 20 years, and in those years I have taught all ages in many different environments–private language schools, public schools, businesses, community centers, my home, and even a university extension class or two. Why do I use three names? Well, my married name is Sakamoto, and most of my friends know me as Barb Sakamoto.

Let's Get Together Thursdays - Research Project Challenges, Pt. 1 How do librarians and teachers negotiate their expectations, roles, and desired outcomes during a collaborative research project? We’ll look at the process in the next two week’s Thursday posts, by Carter Cook, the Director of Library Media Services for Fort Worth Independent School District, in Fort Worth, Texas. One of the challenges of teacher/librarian collaboration is that the pair is working with the same student outcome in mind, but each one has his or her own idea of how it will be achieved. While the teacher may be focused on the student end product and how it addresses the learning objective for the course, the librarian usually focuses on the process – the prerequisite skill set and sequence of steps the students will need to complete to produce the end product. To further complicate the collaborative process, the timeline for completion is usually unrealistically short (in the librarian’s opinion) for students to successfully deliver the end product. Why?

Tips and Tricks from a First Year Tech Teacher Jim Cash, the Instructional Technology Resource Teacher for my school, suggested I write a few paragraphs about what worked and what I wish I’d done differently this year in my new position as an Instructional Technology Teacher. Great idea, but where to start – I’ve learned so much. Let me begin with what worked for me this year. 1. Student Number Cards When I got the class lists of students I’d be teaching, I wrote out each student’s login number (from Kindergarten to grade 2) on an index card and grouped them by classes. A Principal's Reflections: Why Personalize How we best learn has been a hot topic for many years. As most would agree experiences that are relevant, practical to our needs, meaningful, and applicable drive learning. The ability to acquire and construct new knowledge, then apply it in ways to solve complex problems, is at the heart of what education has been tasked with accomplishing. This lofty goal has fallen way short of expectations as our education system has changed very little over the past 100 years.

for teachers by teachers by David Dodgson “But you only teach six lessons a day and you have a guaranteed summer holiday…” Ah, the common misconception that being a teacher is somehow an “easy” job! We all know the truth, however. We know that those six hours in the classroom are intense, full hours; we know that those six hours are supported by more hours of planning and preparing; we know that those six hours are followed by marking and reviewing; and we know that those “guaranteed” weekends and holidays often include training and development. We devote ourselves to the task regardless.

Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: The Teacher Is Not The Most Important Factor When It Comes To Learning A familiar refrain I hear among educators is this: “When it comes to learning, we can all agree that the most important factor is the teacher.” Teaching is widely considered the most important when it comes to the education of children. Parents often believe it. Politicians say it. Ed Reformers buy it. Badass Teachers agree -- as illustrated below. The Rapid eLearning Blog - Practical, real-world tips for e-learning success. Creating great interactive learning experiences requires a few core building blocks: relevant content, pull versus push, and real-world decisions. With those building blocks you're able to structure effective learning scenarios that are meaningful to the learner and helps meet the objectives of the course. One of those building blocks in creating relevant content or content that is placed in a meaningful context. Essentially, you want to recreate the types of scenarios that are similar to the ones the learner has in real life.

Can a Truly Student-Centered Education Be Available to All? Unschooling is a hotly debated topic on MindShift. This subset of home schooling, which doesn’t use any set curriculum and is instead directed by the child’s interests, is vastly different from traditional public and private schools. While the freedom inherent in the model excites some readers, others question whether young people educated this way will learn the important information and skills they need to become productive adults in our society. Some readers object to unschooling because its proponents have opted out of the public system. They argue that a student-centered teaching approach like unschooling could never exist in a public system governed by standardized tests. But in reality there have been public schools modeled after unschooling, and a few still operate programs that hold self-direction at their core.

eTools for Language Teachers Sketchnoting (or visual note-taking)(Click here for a presentation called "Sketchnoting for Beginners". Click here to see my sketchnotes on Flickr.) She told me that she made them with an iPad app called “Paper by fifty-three”. Well, I immediately downloaded the app and my journey into sketchnoting began. Sketchnoting is simply a way to take notes in a more visually attractive way than bullet points. Lesson plans UK This is little village of Cholsey, England Sam is 16 years old and lives in, Cholsey, a small English village together with about 3300 inhabitants. The village is old and consists of many old cottages as well as new houses. In the middle of the village there is the church where the people meet on Sundays to attend morning service. A couple of years ago Sam’s parents divorced and her mother moved to London but Sam decided to stay in the village with her father Lucas who is a sheep farmer. They live in the outskirts of the village in an old and rather miserable house that needs to be renovated but Sam and her father use a lot of their free time to refurbish it.

Personalized Learning for Students Requires Personalized Learning for Teachers This week CTQ bloggers kicked off a two week exploration of the theme: How Do Teachers [Really] Learn? I have loved reading the blogs and the insights from such thoughtful educators. It has pushed me to reflect on what I have learned about what teachers want and the implications for designing professional learning. Recently, I was working with a group of educators who were describing their successes and challenges, while creating more personalized learning experiences for their students.

A.J. Juliani — Teach Different Today I turn 35 years old. And I couldn’t be more excited than I am right now to share my new book, The PBL Playbook. Over the past few years I’ve been lucky enough to work with teachers, instructional coaches, and school leaders all around the world, both face-to-face and online. What I’ve found (over and […]

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