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The History of the Internet in a Nutshell

The History of the Internet in a Nutshell
By Cameron Chapman If you’re reading this article, it’s likely that you spend a fair amount of time online. However, considering how much of an influence the Internet has in our daily lives, how many of us actually know the story of how it got its start? Here’s a brief history of the Internet, including important dates, people, projects, sites, and other information that should give you at least a partial picture of what this thing we call the Internet really is, and where it came from. While the complete history of the Internet could easily fill a few books, this article should familiarize you with key milestones and events related to the growth and evolution of the Internet between 1969 to 2009. 1969: Arpanet Arpanet was the first real network to run on packet switching technology (new at the time). The first message sent across the network was supposed to be "Login", but reportedly, the link between the two colleges crashed on the letter "g". 1969: Unix 1970: Arpanet network 1971: Email Related:  technology & internetstoria di internet

WebReaper - Introduction From semantic Web (3.0) to the WebOS (4.0) Nova Spivack of Radar Networks maps out his view of the evolution of the Web over the next 25 years. Nova said he isn't sure about exact dates or technologies on the top end of the map, but his view of ten-year blocks to fully evolve each phase is realistic. Nor should we get hung up on the naming convention--1.0, 2.0, etc. The idea that the next major deepening of the Internet as a platform will involve the semantic Web is reasonable, and was the subject of much discussion in November. Nova's stealth-mode company is working on what he describes as a "Java-based framework for semantic web applications and services that has some similarities to Ruby on Rails, and also includes a lot of other technology such as our extremely fast and scaleable storage layer for semantic data tuples, powerful semantic query capabilities, and a range of algorithms for analyzing data and doing intelligent things for users." Source: Nova Spivack and Radar Networks

Force YouTube to buffer your entire video Back in the good old days, when you started watching a YouTube video, the entire thing would download (or "buffer") in the background, thus ensuring a relatively smooth playback experience. If you had a slow connection, you could simply pause the video until you saw the "buffer bar" complete its journey from left to right. But thanks to YouTube's switch to a new protocol (Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP, or DASH, if you're interested), that trick no longer works. Now, when you play a video, YouTube buffers only a small amount. And that can lead to stuttering, frequently interrupted playback. Thanks to a browser add-on called YouTube Center, it's now possible to disable DASH, thus forcing YouTube to buffer your entire video. That's the good news. As a Chrome user, I had to jump through a few hoops. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Now, when you start a video, you'll see the buffer bar run all the way to the right, indicating that the full video is queued for playback, not just a few seconds' worth.

40 maps that explain the internet The internet increasingly pervades our lives, delivering information to us no matter where we are. It takes a complex system of cables, servers, towers, and other infrastructure, developed over decades, to allow us to stay in touch with our friends and family so effortlessly. Here are 40 maps that will help you better understand the internet — where it came from, how it works, and how it's used by people around the world. How the internet was created Before the internet, there was the ARPANET Before the internet, there was the ARPANETARPANET, the precursor to the modern internet, was an academic research project funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency, a branch of the military known for funding ambitious research projects without immediate commercial or military applications. Initially, the network only connected the University of Utah with three research centers in California. The internet around the world Threats to the internet The geography of online services Twerking vs.

Accurately Keep Track Of What You Do On The Computer & For How Long With RescueTime If you spend a considerable amount of time working at your computer with no Corporate Big Brother to monitor what you’re doing, you may find yourself spending a bit more time than you should be tweeting, Facebooking, and procrastinating your day away. While there’s nothing wrong with good old leisure activities, the adage “time is money” means a lot if you’re reading mentions on Twitter instead of dealing with a work-related project deadline. In this regard, a very useful program called RescueTime can act as your own little time tracking service, clocking what you do on your computer. How It Works All RescueTime requires you to do is a site registration, and to download and install its Mac Data Collector, which will monitor, in the background, all the applications you use, the websites you visit, and the files you work on throughout the day. The Dashboard The Mac Data Collector icon rests in your menubar, which is a convenient way to click to the Dashboard of your RescueTime account page.

Italiaonline Top 10 Tech Concepts You Always Wanted To Learn About (But Never Did) Store your data on someone else's computer, hope they don't do anything bad with it or decide to shut down. Stallman calls it "Careless Computing". If you put personal data in-the-cloud like future plans., trips, your current GPS location, then you should expect that data to be shared all over the world with nice people, nice companies and criminals (looking for when to rob you). Facebook connections and twitter followers provide information about you and your friends. If you aren't paying for the services ( ea probably $15/month or more), then you and your data are probably the product being sold. It's good to have a paranoid person around, but citations please. * [lmgtfy.com] has at least 50 story references * [lmgtfy.com] | | and another ref - [articles.cnn.com] * A Twitter user who was a little too open with his plans.

The WELL The Whole Earth 'Lectronic Link, normally shortened to The WELL, is one of the oldest virtual communities in continuous operation. As of June 2012, it had 2,693 members.[2] It is best known for its Internet forums, but also provides email, shell accounts, and web pages. The discussion and topics on the WELL range from deeply serious to trivial, depending on the nature and interests of the participants. History[edit] In August 2005 Salon Media Group announced that it was looking for a buyer for the WELL, in order to concentrate on other business lines. In June 2012 Salon once again announced that it was looking for a buyer for the WELL as its subscriber base "did not bear financial promise". In September 2012, Salon Media Group sold the WELL to the group of members.[6] Topics of discussion[edit] The WELL is divided into general subject areas known as conferences. Policy and governance[edit] Joining and reading[edit] Journalists on The WELL[edit] The WELL in the news[edit] See also[edit]

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