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The WELL

The WELL
The Whole Earth 'Lectronic Link, normally shortened to The WELL, is one of the oldest virtual communities in continuous operation. As of June 2012, it had 2,693 members.[2] It is best known for its Internet forums, but also provides email, shell accounts, and web pages. The discussion and topics on the WELL range from deeply serious to trivial, depending on the nature and interests of the participants. History[edit] In August 2005 Salon Media Group announced that it was looking for a buyer for the WELL, in order to concentrate on other business lines. In June 2012 Salon once again announced that it was looking for a buyer for the WELL as its subscriber base "did not bear financial promise". In September 2012, Salon Media Group sold the WELL to the group of members.[6] Topics of discussion[edit] The WELL is divided into general subject areas known as conferences. Policy and governance[edit] Joining and reading[edit] Journalists on The WELL[edit] The WELL in the news[edit] See also[edit] Related:  Wikistoria di internet

The Whole Earth Catalog Effect [Header = Intro] In the opening pages of The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Tom Wolfe describes “a thin blond guy with a blazing disk on his forehead,” wearing “just an Indian bead necklace on bare skin and a white butcher’s coat with medals from the King of Sweden on it.” This guy is Stewart Brand, a Stanford-educated biologist and an ex–Army paratrooper turned Ken Kesey cohort and fellow merry prankster who, in 1966, at age 28, had launched a nationwide campaign to convince nasa to release for the first time a photo of the entire planet taken from space. While on that flight, Brand came up with a solution: to publish a magazine in the vein of the LL Bean catalog—which he’d always admired for its immense practicality—that would blend liberal social values with emerging ideas about “appropriate technology” and “whole-systems thinking.” The WEC lasted four years (along with some special editions since). It is now 40 years later and the WEC’s avalanche of influence continues to flow.

8-Circuit Model of Consciousness The eight-circuit model of consciousness is a theory proposed by Timothy Leary and expanded on by Robert Anton Wilson and Antero Alli. The model describes eight circuits of information (eight "brains") that operate within the human nervous system. Each circuit is concerned with a different sphere of activity. Leary, Alli and Wilson have written about the model in depth and how each circuit operates, both in the lives of individual people and in societies. The term "circuits" came from the first wave of cybernetics research and development in the United States in the 1970s. The eight circuits[edit] 1. This circuit is concerned with nourishment, physical safety, comfort and survival, suckling, cuddling etc. This circuit is activated in adults by opioids such as morphine and heroin. A positive imprint sets up a basic attitude of trust. This circuit is said to have appeared in the earliest evolution of the invertebrate brain and corresponds to the reptilian brain of triune brain theory. 2. 3.

Italiaonline Whole Earth Catalog The first color image of Earth, a composite of images taken in 1967 by the ATS-3 satellite, was used as the cover image of Whole Earth Catalog's first edition. The Whole Earth Catalog (WEC) was an American counterculture magazine and product catalog published by Stewart Brand several times a year between 1968 and 1972, and occasionally thereafter, until 1998. The magazine featured essays and articles, but was primarily focused on product reviews. Origin[edit] The title Whole Earth Catalog came from a previous project by Stewart Brand. Andrew Kirk in Counterculture Green notes that the Whole Earth Catalog was preceded by the "Whole Earth Truck Store". ‘Here’s a tool that will make drilling a well, or grinding flour, easier,’ Brand would tell [the hippies,] pointing it out in his catalog of recommended tools. Using the most basic typesetting and page-layout tools, Brand and his colleagues created the first issue of The Whole Earth Catalog in 1968. J. Organization[edit] Books[edit]

Akashic records Background[edit] Akasha is a Sanskrit word meaning "sky", "space" or "aether", and it entered the language of theosophy through H. P. Accounts of purported akashic access[edit] Readings of the akashic record were central to theosophist writings, but also appear in writings of other related figures. Alice A. "The akashic record is like an immense photographic film, registering all the desires and earth experiences of our planet. Levi H. In The Law of One, Book I, a book purported to contain conversations with a channeled "social memory complex" known to humans as Ra, when the questioner asks where Edgar Cayce received his information, the answer received is, "We have explained before that the intelligent infinity is brought into intelligent energy from eighth density or octave. See also[edit] References[edit] ^ Jump up to: a b c d Brandt, Katharina; Hammer, Olav (2013).

ARPANET Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera. ARPANET (acronimo di "Advanced Research Projects Agency NETwork", in italiano "rete dell'agenzia dei progetti di ricerca avanzata"), anche scritto ARPAnet o Arpanet, fu una rete di computer studiata e realizzata nel 1969 dal DARPA, l'agenzia del Dipartimento della Difesa degli Stati Uniti responsabile per lo sviluppo di nuove tecnologie ad uso militare. Si tratta della forma per così dire embrionale dalla quale poi nel 1983 nacque Internet. Arpanet fu pensata per scopi militari statunitensi durante la guerra fredda, ma paradossalmente ne nacque uno dei più grandi progetti civili: una rete globale che collega tutta la Terra. Storia[modifica | modifica sorgente] Arpanet nel 1974 La mappa logica di Arpanet nel marzo 1977 Il primo router di Arpanet, il BBN Interface Message Processor (IMP), del 1969 Nel 1958 il Governo degli Stati Uniti decise di creare un istituto di ricerca. Da Arpanet a Internet[modifica | modifica sorgente]

Stewart Brand Stewart Brand (born December 14, 1938) is an American writer, best known as editor of the Whole Earth Catalog. He founded a number of organizations, including The WELL, the Global Business Network, and the Long Now Foundation. He is the author of several books, most recently Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto. Life[edit] Brand attended Phillips Exeter Academy, before studying biology at Stanford University, from which he graduated in 1960. American Indians[edit] Through scholarship and by visiting numerous Indian reservations, he familiarized himself with the Native Americans of the West. Merry Pranksters[edit] By the mid-1960s, he was associated with author Ken Kesey and the "Merry Pranksters", and in San Francisco, with his partner Zach Stewart, Brand produced the Trips Festival, an early effort involving rock music and light shows. NASA images of Earth[edit] Earth from space, by ATS-3 satellite, 1967 Douglas Engelbart[edit] Whole Earth Catalog[edit] The WELL[edit]

Brain–computer interface A brain–computer interface (BCI), sometimes called a mind-machine interface (MMI), direct neural interface (DNI), synthetic telepathy interface (STI) or brain–machine interface (BMI), is a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often directed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions. Research on BCIs began in the 1970s at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) under a grant from the National Science Foundation, followed by a contract from DARPA.[1][2] The papers published after this research also mark the first appearance of the expression brain–computer interface in scientific literature. The field of BCI research and development has since focused primarily on neuroprosthetics applications that aim at restoring damaged hearing, sight and movement. History[edit] Berger's first recording device was very rudimentary. BCI versus neuroprosthetics[edit] Animal BCI research[edit] Early work[edit] 2013: M.

The History of the Internet in a Nutshell By Cameron Chapman If you’re reading this article, it’s likely that you spend a fair amount of time online. However, considering how much of an influence the Internet has in our daily lives, how many of us actually know the story of how it got its start? Here’s a brief history of the Internet, including important dates, people, projects, sites, and other information that should give you at least a partial picture of what this thing we call the Internet really is, and where it came from. While the complete history of the Internet could easily fill a few books, this article should familiarize you with key milestones and events related to the growth and evolution of the Internet between 1969 to 2009. 1969: Arpanet Arpanet was the first real network to run on packet switching technology (new at the time). The first message sent across the network was supposed to be "Login", but reportedly, the link between the two colleges crashed on the letter "g". 1969: Unix 1970: Arpanet network 1971: Email

Carl Jung Carl Gustav Jung (/jʊŋ/; German: [ˈkarl ˈɡʊstaf jʊŋ]; 26 July 1875 – 6 June 1961), often referred to as C. G. Jung, was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology.[2] Jung proposed and developed the concepts of the collective unconscious, archetypes, and extraversion and introversion. His work has been influential not only in psychiatry but also in philosophy, anthropology, archeology, literature, and religious studies. The central concept of analytical psychology is individuation—the psychological process of integrating the opposites, including the conscious with the unconscious, while still maintaining their relative autonomy.[3] Jung considered individuation to be the central process of human development.[4] Jung saw the human psyche as "by nature religious"[5] and made this religiousness the focus of his explorations.[6] Jung is one of the best known contemporary contributors to dream analysis and symbolization. Early years[edit] Childhood family[edit]

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