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Usenet

Usenet
A diagram of Usenet servers and clients. The blue, green, and red dots on the servers represent the groups they carry. Arrows between servers indicate newsgroup group exchanges (feeds). Arrows between clients and servers indicate that a user is subscribed to a certain group and reads or submits articles. One notable difference between a BBS or web forum and Usenet is the absence of a central server and dedicated administrator. Usenet is distributed among a large, constantly changing conglomeration of servers that store and forward messages to one another in so-called news feeds. Introduction[edit] The articles that users post to Usenet are organized into topical categories called newsgroups, which are themselves logically organized into hierarchies of subjects. In most newsgroups, the majority of the articles are responses to some other article. When a user posts an article, it is initially only available on that user's news server. ISPs, news servers, and newsfeeds[edit] History[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usenet

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40 maps that explain the internet The internet increasingly pervades our lives, delivering information to us no matter where we are. It takes a complex system of cables, servers, towers, and other infrastructure, developed over decades, to allow us to stay in touch with our friends and family so effortlessly. Here are 40 maps that will help you better understand the internet — where it came from, how it works, and how it's used by people around the world. How the internet was created Before the internet, there was the ARPANET Before the internet, there was the ARPANETARPANET, the precursor to the modern internet, was an academic research project funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency, a branch of the military known for funding ambitious research projects without immediate commercial or military applications. Initially, the network only connected the University of Utah with three research centers in California.

Freenet History[edit] The origin of Freenet can be traced to Ian Clarke's student project at the University of Edinburgh, which he completed as a graduation requirement in the Summer of 1999.[9][10][11] Ian Clarke's resulting unpublished report "A distributed decentralized information storage and retrieval system" (1999) provided foundation for the seminal paper written in collaboration with other researchers, "Freenet: A Distributed Anonymous Information Storage and Retrieval System" (2001).[12][13] According to CiteSeer, it became one of the most frequently cited computer science articles in 2002.[14] The distributed data store of Freenet is used by many third-party programs and plugins to provide microblogging and media sharing,[16] anonymous, decentralised version tracking,[17] blogging,[18] a generic web of trust for decentralized spam resistance,[19] Shoeshop for using Freenet over Sneakernet,[20] and many more.

Napster Later systems successfully followed and elaborated on Napster's file-copying methods, including Gnutella, Freenet, Bit Torrent and many others. Some systems, like LimeWire, Grokster, Madster and the original eDonkey network, were shut down or altered under similar circumstances. Origin[edit]

From semantic Web (3.0) to the WebOS (4.0) Nova Spivack of Radar Networks maps out his view of the evolution of the Web over the next 25 years. Nova said he isn't sure about exact dates or technologies on the top end of the map, but his view of ten-year blocks to fully evolve each phase is realistic. Nor should we get hung up on the naming convention--1.0, 2.0, etc. The idea that the next major deepening of the Internet as a platform will involve the semantic Web is reasonable, and was the subject of much discussion in November. Nova's stealth-mode company is working on what he describes as a "Java-based framework for semantic web applications and services that has some similarities to Ruby on Rails, and also includes a lot of other technology such as our extremely fast and scaleable storage layer for semantic data tuples, powerful semantic query capabilities, and a range of algorithms for analyzing data and doing intelligent things for users."

Audiogalaxy Audiogalaxy ceased operations on January 31, 2013. History[edit] Audiogalaxy's stated mission was to facilitate sharing of music, though it was also notable for its strong community due to such features as chat-enabled groups and per-artist internet forums. This strong community also facilitated a very broad reach of content across many genres, particular those that tend to remain under-developed in more modern systems. In June 2008, CNET hailed this incarnation of Audiogalaxy as one of the greatest defunct websites in history.[1] Conflict with RIAA over sharing of copyrighted material[edit]

The History of the Internet in a Nutshell By Cameron Chapman If you’re reading this article, it’s likely that you spend a fair amount of time online. However, considering how much of an influence the Internet has in our daily lives, how many of us actually know the story of how it got its start? HTML5 and the ArcGIS Platform - Thinking about HTML5? With the steady growth in smart mobile devices and with increasing support of the HTML5 standard by modern web browsers, interest in HTML5 is clearly on the rise. Webinar Recording Recorded: July 4, 2013 (32 minutes) HTML5-based web and mobile mapping technology has evolved to a point that organizations are leveraging the HTML5 standard and associated technology to provide ready access to spatial data like never before. As well as delivering straightforward, easy-to-use public access to maps via smartphones, tablets, and desktop web browsers without plug-ins, web mapping development platforms like Geocortex are now being deployed in parallel with Esri's ArcGIS platform to help organizations collect and edit data in the field—including in remote and offline environments. Using examples and principles associated with the spatial application infrastructure developed by Latitude Geographics, this webinar will explore how organizations are starting to leverage new development possibilities introduced by the ongoing evolution of web standards.

eDonkey2000 eDonkey2000 (nicknamed "ed2k") was a peer-to-peer file sharing application developed by US company MetaMachine, using the Multisource File Transfer Protocol. The eDonkey client supports both the eDonkey2000 network and the Overnet network. On September 28, 2005, eDonkey was officially discontinued following a cease and desist letter from the RIAA (further info on the case). eDonkey2000 network[edit]

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