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100 Reasons to Mind Map

100 Reasons to Mind Map
100 examples of how you can use mindmapping whether completely new to mind maps or a seasoned pro. I hope the list helps generate ideas for you. 100 Reasons to Mind Map 1. Explore a subject 2. Study & learn a new topic, culture or country 3. Want to share your Mind Maps with others? Here are the 100 reasons on one page:

http://www.mindmapinspiration.com/100-reasons-to-mind-map-paul-foreman/

Related:  Mind Mapping

The Biggest Stumbling Blocks When You Start Mind Mapping Some people start mind mapping and they’re changed forever. They can’t stop raving about it. Then there’s another group of people, which you might be in. It’s the group that tries out mind mapping, but finds there’s something not quite working for them. If I’m describing you, read on. Concept maps or mind maps? the choice What are the differences between mind maps and concept maps? (click to see larger) Sometimes you will have no choice. In an educational setting, some educators require their students to make concept maps, others mandate mind maps. But most of the time we are free to choose.

Getting Started with UI Test Automation User Interface test automation is a tricky practice, and it’s not always obvious what the benefits are. UI tests are an essential part of protecting your application’s critical paths, and it’s easy to start building them in the wrong way. Jim Holmes urges us to ask some pointed questions before we get started, and get start testing our UI the right way, for the right reasons. Republished here with kind permission from the author. UI Automation: Before You Even Start Welcome to the first of two articles on being successful with user interface (UI) automation.

Mind Maps Before the web came hypertext. And before hypertext came mind maps. The Brain Book How to Make a Mind Map® The 'Laws of Mind Mapping' were originally devised by Tony Buzan when he codified the use of imagery, colour and association and coined the phrase 'Mind Mapping'. In the intervening 30 plus years, there have been many variations on the original 'Mind Map ' and the widespread usage of mapping software of various sorts, has dramatically changed what is possible. >> Click here to go to a video that provides a rapid (99 second) overview of how to Mind Map. (Note that you will be asked for your e-mail address so that you can view the video free of charge). The summary below is based on Buzan's structure (a 'Mind Mapping, how to' - details available in his many books) but we believe that whilst this structure is great for establishing well structured maps that can be used in many different ways, variations on these rules or 'laws' are often sensible and appropriate - as long as they are based on an understanding of why the laws exist and what they are trying to help the mind mapper to achieve.

How to create killer mind maps for solving your problems Chic Thompson, in his new book, What a Great Idea 2.0: Unlocking Your Creativity in Business and in Life, devotes an entire chapter to idea mapping and how to get more out of it. One of the techniques he highlights is utilizing a series of trigger words or phrases to help you improve your effectiveness using mind maps for problem solving. Because mind mapping is based upon leveraging the mind’s powerful associative capabilities, I think this technique is particularly useful. In Thompson’s vernacular, a trigger word is the central word or concept that the middle of your mind map. He encourages the reader to generate several mind maps utilizing the following trigger words or phrases:

Draw A Creative Mind Map for Self Analysis Many personal development experts share about the benefits of using mind maps. My post today takes it one step further with how I have used the concept of mind mapping for self analysis. I also share illustrations from my personal art journal that I created some time ago. I drew them as part of my pre-vision board exercises. The (above) mind map picture that I did for self-analysis was my first.

Test Run: Web UI Automation with Windows PowerShell Here I simply display the exception message. In some cases, you may want to use the continue statement to force your test automation to continue running even on a fatal error. Or you may want to exit your automation altogether.

Related:  matlabhelp