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Sixty Symbols

Sixty Symbols
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Personal and Historical Perspectives of Hans Bethe We come from the future. This is, for the most part, an accurate article, except for a few statements. "Exactly what makes a fermion a fermion is a bit complicated, but suffice it to say that fermions are all the particles that deal with matter. So what about the last group of elementary particles, the ones that don't deal with matter? These are the bosons, and they deal with the fundamental forces of the universe." The statements above can be misinterpreted as suggesting that fermions are defined as particles that deal with matter and bosons are defined as particles that deal with forces. And that is not true. Particles that deal with matter are fermions and particles that carry the fundamental forces are bosons. What fermions and bosons really are have to do with two apparently unrelated (but actually related) particle properties: spin and statistics. "There are four known bosons" See, this is an example of the misconception I just mentioned. According to special relativity, not general relativity.

Screws Small Encyclopedia Sometimes You do not know, wha... - justpaste.it Sometimes You do not know, what screw you need to turn this piece of furniture. That is why this little encyclopedia was created. Screws Head Style Drive Types Washer Type Nut Types by Boltdepot.com Neutron stars M. Coleman Miller Professor of Astronomy, University of Maryland Welcome to my neutron star page! I need to emphasize that the stuff I have here represents my opinions, and errors aren't the fault of those patient pedagogues who tried to cram this information into my head. For those who want a quick intro to selected cool things about neutron stars and black holes, check out a poster I made for a science fair at the University of Chicago. I also have a link to some questions I have received about neutron stars, and my answers. Getting started on neutron stars Neutron stars are the collapsed cores of some massive stars. At these incredibly high densities, you could cram all of humanity into a volume the size of a sugar cube. All in all, these extremes mean that the study of neutron stars affords us some unique glimpses into areas of physics that we couldn't study otherwise. So, like, how do we get neutron stars? The guts of a neutron star The decline and fall of a neutron star Thermal history

How Things Work - How Things Work Home Page Khan Academy Ask a Mathematician / Ask a Physicist | Your Math and Physics Questions Answered Audio/Video Lectures Math, Physics, and Engineering Applets Oscillations and Waves Acoustics Signal Processing Electricity and Magnetism: Statics Electrodynamics Quantum Mechanics Linear Algebra Vector Calculus Thermodynamics Miscellaneous Licensing info. Links to other educational sites with math/physics-related information or java applets useful for teaching: And when you get tired of learning, here is some fun stuff: Java Pong Applet a cute little pong game I wrote a while ago.

on iTunes U | Quick Start iTunes makes it fun and easy to organize and play your favorite music. Now, you can also add educational recordings from Stanford University to your iTunes library. From there, you'll be able to create custom playlists, sync to your iPod, burn CDs, or even share your Stanford-related content with others on your network. Ready. Set. Go to www.apple.com/itunes/ and download iTunes for either Macintosh or Windows. Find it. The Search box in the top righthand corner of the iTunes window will search the entire iTunes Store, including content from Stanford University. For more help using iTunes, please visit Apple's how to video page.

Universe Sandbox | interactive space simulator Borobudur Borobudur, or Barabudur, is a 9th-century Mahayana Buddhist Temple in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia. The monument consists of six square platforms topped by three circular platforms and is decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues.[1] A main dome, located at the center of the top platform, is surrounded by 72 Buddha statues seated inside a perforated stupa. It is the world’s largest Buddhist temple,[2][3] as well as one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world.[4] Evidence suggests Borobudur was constructed in the 9th century and abandoned following the 14th-century decline of Hindu kingdoms in Java and the Javanese conversion to Islam.[7] Worldwide knowledge of its existence was sparked in 1814 by Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, then the British ruler of Java, who was advised of its location by native Indonesians. Borobudur has since been preserved through several restorations. Etymology[edit] Borobudur stupas overlooking a mountain. Location[edit] History[edit]

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