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Online Materials Information Resource - MatWeb

Online Materials Information Resource - MatWeb
What is MatWeb? MatWeb's searchable database of material properties includes data sheets of thermoplastic and thermoset polymers such as ABS, nylon, polycarbonate, polyester, polyethylene and polypropylene; metals such as aluminum, cobalt, copper, lead, magnesium, nickel, steel, superalloys, titanium and zinc alloys; ceramics; plus semiconductors, fibers, and other engineering materials. Benefits of registering with MatWeb Premium membership Feature: - Material data exports into CAD/FEA Programs including: How to Find Property Data in MatWeb Click here to see how to enter your company's materials into MatWeb. We have over 100,000 materials in our database, and we are continually adding to that total to provide you with the most comprehensive free source of material property data on the web.

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Academic and Professional Writing: Scientific Reports This section describes an organizational structure commonly used to report experimental research in many scientific disciplines, the IMRAD format: Introduction, Methods, Results, And Discussion. Although the main headings are standard for many scientific fields, details may vary; check with your instructor, or, if submitting an article to a journal, refer to the instructions to authors. Although most scientific reports use the IMRAD format, there are some exceptions. This format is usually not used in reports describing other kinds of research, such as field or case studies, in which headings are more likely to differ according to discipline. Although the main headings are standard for many scientific fields, details may vary; check with your instructor, or, if submitting an article to a journal, refer to the instructions to authors. Use the menu below to find out how to write each part of a scientific report.

Studio Annetta The ever so lovely and talented Christian of Maison 21 Blog has laid down the design gauntlet again. The Obsessive Compulsive Decorating Disorder (OCDD) is something most of us design bloggers suffer from, and this challenge is the perfect way to help us all stay sane, especially in financial times like these... The OCDD challenge involves using at least 2 items from the original entry (I'm keeping the cerused oak floors and the lovely Twombly painting) or from the Maison 21 atelier inventory. Chapter 2. Punctuation, Mechanics, Capitalization, and Spelling Printer-friendly version Habits in writing as in life are only useful if they are broken as soon as they cease to be advantageous.—W.

Plain Language Humor: High Tech Humor The remarkable growth of the information technology industry has created a tremendous opportunity for people with skill putting words on paper. Technical writers, once a rare and highly skilled position, are now as common as fruit flies—though they take up a lot more space. Yet the pay is pretty good considering how little work they actually do, so young English-major weenies desperate for employment continue to swarm around IT companies, hoping for a bit of rotting fru—er, looking for a plum position. But it's not quite as easy as pulling up a keyboard and translating an engineer's notes into common English.

Plain Writing We at the Department of Agriculture (USDA) are committed to improving our service to you by writing in plain language. By October 2011, we will use plain language in any new or substantially revised document that: Provides information about any of our services and benefits; Is needed to obtain any of our benefits or services; or, Explains how to comply with a requirement that we administer or enforce. We pledge to provide you with information that is clear, understandable, and useful in every paper or electronic letter, publication, form, notice, or instruction we publish.

Grammar Handbook « Writers Workshop: Writer Resources « The Center for Writing Studies, Illinois Thank you for using the Grammar Handbook at the Writers' Workshop, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This Handbook explains and illustrates the basic grammatical rules concerning parts of speech, phrases, clauses, sentences and sentence elements, and common problems of usage. While we have done our best to be comprehensive and accurate, we do not claim to be the final authority on grammatical issues. We appreciate constructive emails with questions, suggestions, or corrections, but please understand we may be unable to respond to all of them. Handbook Sections Parts of Speech

Academic Writing - Writing Commons "Academic Writing" was written by Joseph Moxley, University of South Florida The phrase, "Oh, that's academic!" tends to mean "Forget about it! Coherence: Transitions between Ideas The most convincing ideas in the world, expressed in the most beautiful sentences, will move no one unless those ideas are properly connected. Unless readers can move easily from one thought to another, they will surely find something else to read or turn on the television. Providing transitions between ideas is largely a matter of attitude.

2682: Technical English and Verbing Nouns Today, we verb a little. The Honors College at the University of Houston presents this program about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. Recently I read a sentence online: “Mouse over thumbnail to enlarge.” It struck me how it contains basic words like “mouse” and “thumbnail”; they’ve been around for centuries. References: Life Sciences In assignments, sources are referred to by the name of the author and the date of publication (the Harvard reference system), or by a number (the Vancouver reference system). About 18% of references in the Life Sciences assignments follow the numerical Vancouver system. The rest follow the Harvard system. Harvard references can be ‘integral’ or ‘non-integral’. In integral references the author’s name (or an equivalent proper noun) is part of the sentence.

Sentence and paragraph development - Writing for the United Nations Contents A. Sentence development B. Paragraph development C. Topic sentences D.

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