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Planting A Pineapple

Planting A Pineapple
Did y’all know that you can take this and turn it into… This? And that this will eventually produce… This? Yes, I’m talking about turning your average, ordinary grocery store pineapple into a tropical showpiece within your home. A plant that is not only impressive but will WOW! Planting a Pineapple 1. 2. 3. In 24 months (sounds better than two years) it will look like this. You will have an actual, large, utterly delicious pineapple in 24-36 months. The thought of growing my own pineapple always makes me smile and giggle just a little bit. Now what am I supposed to do with all of this leftover pineapple? I see something sweet coming soon. While you’re waiting for me to make something yummy with the leftovers, go ahead and plant a pineapple. Be adventurous plant a pineapple. Hugs, Tickled Red *Please bear in mind that I am not a hortoculturist. Tagged as: Gardening, Pineapple, Tropical Fruit

http://www.tickledred.com/planting-a-pineapple/

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20 Plants for garden pathways which can handle foot traffic There are infinite numbers of plants available to cultivate in your garden. But, there are very few varieties of plants that can be grown on pathways, because most of the plants are too sensitive to tolerate people’s feet. Here is a list of some very common plants which you can use to decorate the walkways of your garden. 1. Irish moss It is one of the most important family member of Moss but much different from other plants of Moss family.

Flowers blown apart Time After Time & Blow Up [2007] The large-scale photographs entitled Blow Up depict elaborate floral arrangements, based upon a 19th Century still-life painting by Henri Fantin-Latour, captured in the moment of exploding. Gersht´s compositions are literally frozen in motion, a process dependent on the ability of the advanced technology of photography to freeze-frame action. This visual occurrence, that is too fast for the human eye to process and can only be perceived with the aid of photography, is what Walter Benjamin called the ‘optical unconsciousness’ in his seminal essay ‘A Short History of Photography’.

How to Make Your Own Beauty Products from Scratch - Health Let's keep things simple this week. When it comes to personal-care products, we are big believers in streamlining what you use—see "Eight Products You Think You Need But Don't" for a refresher—buying less in general, and getting creative. We have both always loved experimenting in our kitchens and our bathrooms, checking ingredients in products we love, isolating the main ones, and then trying them on their own. Roundup: 12 DIY Plant Marker Tutorials » Curbly If you've ever planted something in your garden--vegetable or otherwise--and then subsequently forget what plant you planted in the spot until it produces fruit/vegetables/flowers, then you might need some plant markers. Luckily the intertubes are replete with ideas for making them. We'll start with simpler options and then work our way into fancy-schmancy territory.

Zaytuna Farm Yields History has shown time and time again that civilizations have risen and fallen based on the quantity and health of their topsoil. Since food is the basis of civilization and topsoil is the basis of food this is not a difficult concept to understand. What is difficult to understand is why we continue to follow the same patterns as past civilizations: de-forest, plow, crop, irrigate, and graze until the soil can no longer support life.While this pattern has historically lead to collapse we have managed to perpetuate it by introducing a petroleum-based agricultural system which grows food in lifeless soil.

Leafsnap, a new mobile app that identifies plants by leaf shape, is launched by Smithsonian and collaborators  The Smithsonian Institution, Columbia University and the University of Maryland have pooled their expertise to create the world’s first plant identification mobile app using visual search—Leafsnap. This electronic field guide allows users to identify tree species simply by taking a photograph of the tree’s leaves. In addition to the species name, Leafsnap provides high-resolution photographs and information about the tree’s flowers, fruit, seeds and bark—giving the user a comprehensive understanding of the species. Smithsonian botanist John Kress uses the new mobile app to correctly identify a katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) growing in the Smithsonian’s Enid A. Haupt Garden on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. “We wanted to use mathematical techniques we were developing for face recognition and apply them to species identification,” said Peter Belhumeur, professor of computer science at Columbia and leader of the Columbia team working on Leafsnap.

"sunrise through nature`s eyes" Random photo Submit your photo Stumble Thru Smart tips to make life easier Posted on February 24, 2012 in Humor If you’re new here, you may want to subscribe to our RSS feed or follow us on Facebook or Twitter . Thanks for visiting! Rate this Post DIY: Paint Can Planters I came up with a great idea for a garden planter the other day as I was browsing the paint aisle of all places. I spied a stack of plain paint cans and thought, those would make amazing planters so I brought a few home and with a little painter’s tape and spray paint created these: I had a bare patch of fence in my rear yard that was in need of attention. I really didn’t feel like painting it again, which is what it needed (ha!), so I thought I’d distract everyone with some whimsical decor. And this was such an easy and inexpensive way to do it.

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