background preloader

7 Cheap But Beautiful DIY Garden Decor Ideas

7 Cheap But Beautiful DIY Garden Decor Ideas
I must be painting a terrible portrait of myself. Lazy gardener. Lazy cleaner. Cheap organizer. Pest poisoner extraordinaire. I'm also incredibly cheap when it comes to garden decor. You can make these pieces from things you have around the house, items you've collected, salvaged, or thrifted, and some of the cheapest supplies your local Lowe's has to offer. Bonus: Nothing here is hard to make. Stepping Stones -- These are deceptively simple to make, and it’s one project where you determine the budget and materials. Luminaries -- These are particularly great around the patio, or in a sitting space you’ve created out in the garden. Bird Baths -- There are nine million ways to make a birdbath. Copper Trellis -- This is one of my favorite pieces to make, and it creates big impact in the garden. Hypertufa Leaf Casting -- Hyper-wha? Tea-cup Birdfeeder -- I love these, especially using thrifted vintage cups -- the really delicate ones -- and putting them in a group at varying heights. Related:  Gardening/Community Gardens

Terrarium Centerpieces  The other week, my good friend Stephanie and I planned out a craft weekend. Our mission: Terrariums. Not the kind you keep lizards in, but the kind you can seal up and watch the moss grow. Terrariums are meant to be long lasting, so you can even make some months before the wedding and still have them thriving in time for the big day. So lets get down to the nitty-gritty of how you can actually make them: Step 1: Materials • Glass containers in whatever size you heart most. • Good dirt and rocks. • Figurines or decorative rocks to place inside. • Horticultural Charcoal. • Moss (another one of those things you can find outside, but can also order if you don’t live somewhere it doesn’t grow naturally). • Spray bottle (for misting after wards). Step 2: Wash out your containers and rocks (you never know what animal has probably peed on them outside). Step 3: Then start your layering your base. Step 4: Add your moss, and give it a couple shot glasses (depending on the container size) of water.

My Tiny Plot 17 Apart: Growing Celery Indoors: Never Buy Celery Again Remember when we tested and shared how to grow onions indefinitely last week? Well, at the same time, we've been testing out another little indoor gardening project first gleaned from Pinterest that we're excited to share the successes of today — regrowing celery from it's base. We've figured out how to literally re-grow organic celery from the base of the bunch we bought from the store a couple weeks ago. I swear, we must have been living under a rock all these years or just not be that resourceful when it comes to food, but we're having more fun learning all these new little tips and tricks as we dive deeper into trying to grow more of our own food. This project is almost as simple as the onion growing project — simply chop the celery stalks from the base of the celery you bought from the store and use as you normally would. We let our celery base hang out in the saucer of water for right around one week, give or take. Update 2: Here's how we are looking at almost 3-4 weeks of growth:

DIY Succulent Pallet Table | Far Out Flora Max with the new Succulent Table. Can you believe that our latest DIY project was once just a couple of junky pallets and some scrappy table legs? Crazy…if I didn’t have photos, I wouldn’t believe it myself. Not too long ago, we whipped out a coffee table sized succulent table out of an old shipping crate. Now we scaled it up. The pallets. First bit of advice, deconstructing pallets are a big pain unless you have the right tools…and our hammer and wall scrapper wasn’t quite doing the trick. Couple good planks. Love the scares of time left on these chunks of pallet wood. Attaching the legs. After pulling apart two pallets, we used the 2 x 4 sized boards to make a rectangular frame to attached the appropriated table legs. Dry run for fittings. Like TV magic (and 2 days later), the table was more or less put together. Megan with some semps. After a weekend of slivers and sweat, we finally got to plant this baby. Getting messy. Packing them in. Yeah, we didn’t hold back on jamming them.

PlantSF The Lazy Lady’s Guide to DIY: Hanging Herb Garden At some point near the middle of March, I always decide that I’m “done” with winter. The sweaters and jackets get pushed to the back of the closet, the flip flops come out, and I inevitably freeze my butt off for several weeks until the weather catches up with my warm-weather state of mind. Likewise, my cravings for fresh herbs and veggies are always a little ahead of the season. Growing your own herbs is a great way to save money and avoid buying too much at a time and letting most of it go to waste. What you’ll need: Tin containers with snap-on plastic lids (tea, cocoa, and coffee cans are a good bet), coat hangers, pliers, scissors, herbs (I bought basil, rosemary, dill, and cilantro for about $2.50 each), masking tape, coffee filters, a nail, a hammer, X-acto knife, scrap fabric or paper, and glue or spray adhesive. After you’ve emptied and cleaned your cans, remove the bottom of the can with a can opener. Slide the bottom inside the can, holding it up from inside. Happy growing!

How to Grow Green Onions Indefinitely I'm officially dubbing this the week of Scallions and Pinterest. Mary and I separately came across 2 trending ideas for using and growing green onions on the highly addictive bookmarking site, Pinterest, last week — we couldn't wait to try them. When I came home over the weekend with a bunch of scallions, Mary exclaimed, "did you see this scallion/ginger sauce I pinned — you should totally make that!" I had been planning to make this ginger scallion sauce from Lottie + Doof since I first set eyes on it. It's a great little accompaniment that could be used in so many ways. So, back to scallions and Pinterest. All I can say is... it works! This is it guys — place a bunch of scallions with their roots in a glass full of water, then place in a sunny window. Here's a shot of some of the green onions with 2 that I chopped down to the roots. This is what they looked like not even 2 days (left) and 4 days (right) later as they literally regrew themselves: P.S. Discover More:

Growing a Vegetable Garden at Epicurious Read the seed packet Most people don't read the instructions and then wonder why the plants don't thrive. You'll get tips on planting, nurturing, and harvesting your vegetables on better labels. These recommendations come from seed experts who have run trials to determine the best growing conditions for each variety of plant. Try this compost mix to improve your soil Alys Fowler, author of Garden Anywhere (Chronicle Books, May 2009), shares this compost mix for vegetables: 4 parts multipurpose potting soil, 1 part vermiculite, 2 parts composted fine bark, and 1 handful per pot of slow-release organic fertilizer, such as bat guano, sea kelp, or fish manure. Plant root vegetables with plenty of space The larger the space between them, the bigger the vegetables grow. Grow flowers to attract "good" insects Nasturtiums, California poppies, and marigolds all invite helpful pest-eating insects such as ladybugs, hoverflies, lacewings, and ground and soldier beetles to your garden. Recycle Containers

Creative Organic Gardening - Permaculture gardens (permanent culture) is an approach to everyday life that integrates plants, animals, landscape, structures; people who purposely design all the facets of their lives to enhance environmental sustainability within a permanent, sustainable agricultural and cultural system - a diverse, complex eco-system, where the all of the elements interact in mutually beneficial ways to produce a whole which is greater than the sum of its parts. The art of designing garden areas that are modeled on the relationships found in natural ecologies. Permanent is from the Latin "permanens" - to remain to the end, to persist throughout. Culture is from the Latin "cultura" - meaning the cultivation of land, or the intellect. Permaculture is sustainable land use design. Elements in a system are viewed in relationship to other elements, where the outputs of one element become the inputs of another. Planting a Permaculture Garden The use of patterns found in nature are key to permaculture design. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Spring Gardening on the Cheap If your thumb is even slightly green, a home garden can go a long way to cutting your grocery bills. The National Gardening Association estimates you’ll get a half-pound of vegetables for each square foot in your garden, or roughly $600 in produce over the course of a season for the average 600-square-foot plot. Growing it all could take as little as $70, they estimate. For a $50 annual investment in plants, Frugal Foodie’s terrace container garden provides a good amount of edibles from March until October, including spinach, peppers and tomatoes for salads, blueberries and snap peas for snacking and herbs for pesto, chimichurri, and fresh flavor in pretty much every other recipe. What’s your best tip for gardening on the cheap? Here’s what home gardeners, chefs and other experts offered up: Experiment with herbs. If you grow nothing else, try a few pots of herbs like basil, dill, oregano, and parsley. Caffeinate. Not you, the plants. Skip pesticides. Use a rain barrel. Freecycle. Share.

RECIPES

Related: