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7 Cheap But Beautiful DIY Garden Decor Ideas

7 Cheap But Beautiful DIY Garden Decor Ideas
I must be painting a terrible portrait of myself. Lazy gardener. Lazy cleaner. Cheap organizer. Pest poisoner extraordinaire. I'm also incredibly cheap when it comes to garden decor. You can make these pieces from things you have around the house, items you've collected, salvaged, or thrifted, and some of the cheapest supplies your local Lowe's has to offer. Bonus: Nothing here is hard to make. Stepping Stones -- These are deceptively simple to make, and it’s one project where you determine the budget and materials. Luminaries -- These are particularly great around the patio, or in a sitting space you’ve created out in the garden. Bird Baths -- There are nine million ways to make a birdbath. Copper Trellis -- This is one of my favorite pieces to make, and it creates big impact in the garden. Hypertufa Leaf Casting -- Hyper-wha? Tea-cup Birdfeeder -- I love these, especially using thrifted vintage cups -- the really delicate ones -- and putting them in a group at varying heights. Related:  gardening

General Fabric Care Guide General Fabric Care Guide Most acetate garments should be dry-cleaned. Some knits are washable. Hand wash in warm water with mild suds. Do not twist or wring out the garment. Do not soak colored items. Press while damp on the wrong side with a cool iron. Circular knits should be laid flat to dry. For specific instructions, always refer to the garment's sewn-in care label. Note: Acetate is adversely affected by acetone and other organic solvents, such as nail polish remover and perfumes containing such solvents. Acrylic garments may be washed or dry cleaned. When machine washing, use warm water setting and add a fabric softener during the final rinse cycle. Machine dry at low temperature. Wash delicate items by hand in warm water. If ironing is required, use moderately warm iron. Cotton can be easily laundered. Any good detergent can be used to wash cotton. Chlorine bleach can be used safely on cotton whites. Since cotton fibers are fairly inelastic cotton fabrics may wrinkle easily. Do not iron.

17 Apart: Growing Celery Indoors: Never Buy Celery Again Remember when we tested and shared how to grow onions indefinitely last week? Well, at the same time, we've been testing out another little indoor gardening project first gleaned from Pinterest that we're excited to share the successes of today — regrowing celery from it's base. We've figured out how to literally re-grow organic celery from the base of the bunch we bought from the store a couple weeks ago. I swear, we must have been living under a rock all these years or just not be that resourceful when it comes to food, but we're having more fun learning all these new little tips and tricks as we dive deeper into trying to grow more of our own food. This project is almost as simple as the onion growing project — simply chop the celery stalks from the base of the celery you bought from the store and use as you normally would. We let our celery base hang out in the saucer of water for right around one week, give or take. Update 2: Here's how we are looking at almost 3-4 weeks of growth:

Home - Plants and Healers International Planting A Pineapple Did y’all know that you can take this and turn it into… This? And that this will eventually produce… This? Yes, I’m talking about turning your average, ordinary grocery store pineapple into a tropical showpiece within your home. Planting a Pineapple 1. 2. 3. In 24 months (sounds better than two years) it will look like this. You will have an actual, large, utterly delicious pineapple in 24-36 months. The thought of growing my own pineapple always makes me smile and giggle just a little bit. Now what am I supposed to do with all of this leftover pineapple? I see something sweet coming soon. While you’re waiting for me to make something yummy with the leftovers, go ahead and plant a pineapple. Be adventurous plant a pineapple. Hugs, Tickled Red *Please bear in mind that I am not a hortoculturist. Tagged as: Gardening, Pineapple, Tropical Fruit

The Lazy Lady’s Guide to DIY: Hanging Herb Garden At some point near the middle of March, I always decide that I’m “done” with winter. The sweaters and jackets get pushed to the back of the closet, the flip flops come out, and I inevitably freeze my butt off for several weeks until the weather catches up with my warm-weather state of mind. Likewise, my cravings for fresh herbs and veggies are always a little ahead of the season. Growing your own herbs is a great way to save money and avoid buying too much at a time and letting most of it go to waste. What you’ll need: Tin containers with snap-on plastic lids (tea, cocoa, and coffee cans are a good bet), coat hangers, pliers, scissors, herbs (I bought basil, rosemary, dill, and cilantro for about $2.50 each), masking tape, coffee filters, a nail, a hammer, X-acto knife, scrap fabric or paper, and glue or spray adhesive. After you’ve emptied and cleaned your cans, remove the bottom of the can with a can opener. Slide the bottom inside the can, holding it up from inside. Happy growing!

Best Gardening Websites: Online Tools To Guide Your Green Thumb From Mother Nature Network's Ramon Gonzalez: A Google search can help you find many online gardening resources, but the amount of information can be overwhelming, and there's no guarantee that the top search results will be written by knowledgeable gardeners or even answer your questions. Experienced gardeners have their favorite gardening websites and resources bookmarked for easy reference. If you're just getting started with gardening, you may not know where to start. Below we've compiled a number of websites and resources to help you get your garden off the ground this year. With so much free gardening information available online, there's no reason you can't grow a successful garden. List and captions courtesy of MNN Loading Slideshow Determine Your Garden ZoneMaking a trip to your garden center when you don't know what plants to buy can be a costly mistake. Hide Thumbnails

Potted | Outdoor Furniture, Fire Pits, Garden Planters, Gifts, California So to say we’ve become a little air plant crazy at Potted these days would be an understatement. If it’s possible, we #putanairplantonit. And Instagram has only made this obsession well…more obsessive. On a City Planter…doesn’t that look lovely? On this super groovy Skull Planter. In this tiny Day of the Dead candlestick holder (or is it a ring holder?) We’ve made Tillandsia Trees with glue and Manzanita branches. We’ve layered sand in hanging glass containers and perched air plants on top like tiny Dr. We’ve sat them in Tiny Ceramic Cups (don’t you just love the Concrete Diamond in the background by our good friend designer Dustin Gimbel?) We’ve used repetition to create simple beauty. We’ve done absolutely nothing and just paired the right plant with the right perch (thank you, Titia Estes, for this lovely little bowl). We’ve shoved them into these super adorable hanging Air Pods and hung them everywhere. This mobile from Craft Organic in Florida made my heart swoon. And this is cool.

How to Grow Green Onions Indefinitely I'm officially dubbing this the week of Scallions and Pinterest. Mary and I separately came across 2 trending ideas for using and growing green onions on the highly addictive bookmarking site, Pinterest, last week — we couldn't wait to try them. When I came home over the weekend with a bunch of scallions, Mary exclaimed, "did you see this scallion/ginger sauce I pinned — you should totally make that!" I had been planning to make this ginger scallion sauce from Lottie + Doof since I first set eyes on it. It's a great little accompaniment that could be used in so many ways. So, back to scallions and Pinterest. All I can say is... it works! This is it guys — place a bunch of scallions with their roots in a glass full of water, then place in a sunny window. Here's a shot of some of the green onions with 2 that I chopped down to the roots. This is what they looked like not even 2 days (left) and 4 days (right) later as they literally regrew themselves: P.S. Discover More:

Bottle Drip Irrigation | I prefer to have the bottle standing right-way-up as I think it looks nicer and it keeps debris out of the bottle thus keeping the holes from blocking. The materials: * 2 litre plastic soft-drink bottle or water bottle * Sharp small screwdriver, pointed hole-maker or drill This can be used in container gardening, raised bed gardens and open vegetable gardens. Using your pocket knife, make 2 small slits in the bottom of your bottle. Make two more small slits half way up your bottle. Dig a hole next to your tomato plant. This will slowly deep-water your tomato plants and most other vegetable plants. You can learn more about this on another website. Only two very small holes are needed at the lowest place on the bottle. I prefer to leave the lids off. Place bamboo stakes next to each bottle. Here I am making another hole slightly higher up the bottle. However, if I remove the lid, water will come out this hole as well as the holes in the base. Fast fill.

How To Style a Fishtail Braid We love the look of fishtail braids! This trend is incredibly easy to style, even on your own hair. Kinsey and I photographed the steps so you can try it out for yourself... Here's how to style a fishtail braid... 1. Part your hair into two even sections. 2. Next, we had a crazy idea... weave pieces of yarn into the braid? 1. We thought it was pretty cute!

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