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Sesquipedaedalus: Prettiest Words: A Work in Progress

Sesquipedaedalus: Prettiest Words: A Work in Progress
Prettiest Words, Alphabetized (1,027) Abattoir: a slaughterhouse; massacre Absinthe: wormwood liquor of a bright-green color Acciaccatura: grace note, an embellishing note usually written in smaller size Acedia: ennui; state of torpor or listlessness; spiritual apathy Acervuline: aggregated, heaped up, bundled, collected or localized Acidulous: somewhat acidic or sour in taste or manner; somewhat sarcastic Acolyte: ranked clergy member; assistant in liturgical rites Acoustic: of or relating to sound, the sense of hearing, or the science of sound Acquiesce: to passively accept; to accept, comply, or submit passively Adroit: quick or skillful; adept in action or thought Adumbrate: to explain faintly or opaquely outline; describe Aeipathy: continued passion; unyielding disease Aeneous: brassy; a type of golden-green Aeolian: pertaining to, of, related to, caused by or like the wind or Aeolus Aeonian: continuing forever; eternal Aerial: of, in, or caused by the air; existing or living in the air

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Latin Phrases It’s a matter of taste and style, but not long ago American writers attempted to demonstrate their credentials to the world by including Latin and French phrases within works. A dash of Latin was expected of the moderately educated throughout the Western world. annus mirabilis - wonderful year arbiter elegantiae - judge of the elegant; one who knows the good things in life bona fides - good faith; credentials 25 Insights on Becoming a Better Writer When George Plimpton asked Ernest Hemingway what the best training for an aspiring writer would be in a 1954 interview, Hem replied, “Let’s say that he should go out and hang himself because he finds that writing well is impossibly difficult. Then he should be cut down without mercy and forced by his own self to write as well as he can for the rest of his life. At least he will have the story of the hanging to commence with.”

The World's Most Spoken Languages And Where They Are Spoken This beautifully illustrated infographic (above), designed by South China Morning Post’s graphics director Alberto Lucas Lopéz, shows the most spoken known languages in the world and where they’re spoken by the 6.3 billion people included in the study. Based on records collated from the database Ethnologue, the infographic illustrates the wide-ranging facts and figures of the world’s living languages catalogued since 1951. “There are at least 7,102 known languages alive in the world today. Twenty-three of these languages are a mother tongue for more than 50 million people. The 23 languages make up the native tongue of 4.1 billion people,” says Lopez on his infographic. “We represent each language within black borders and then provide the numbers of native speakers (in millions) by country.

The Second Time You Fall In Love With Someone The second time you fall in love with someone, you’re going to feel so relieved. When you get your heart broken for the first time, you can’t imagine loving someone else again or having someone else love you. You worry about your ex finding love before you do, you worry about being damaged goods. And then it happens. Someone else loves you and you can sleep well at night. The second time you fall in love with someone, it’s going to feel different. Ologies Ologies -ology, a suffix derived from the Greek logos, meaning the 'study of', 'specialty in' or 'art of' a given scientific or medical field. The following is a long list of ologies, along with their fields of study. Many are common and respected - many more are obscure and unusual.

Article Writing: Three Core Elements of Storytelling Think of a story. Any story. Maybe just Cinderella, for instance. What does it bring up right away to your mind? 1) Sequence 2) Suspense and 3) The roller coaster Stories are like magic lamps. Luciferous Logolepsy Welcome to Luciferous Logolepsy, a collection of over 9,000 obscure English words. Though the definition of an "English" word might seem to be straightforward, it is not. There exist so many adopted, derivative, archaic or abandoned words in what we loosely define as the "English Language", that a clear-cut definition seems impossible.

The case of the missing “u”s in American English Before you consciously became aware of your decision to read this article, your brain was already making the necessary preparations to click the link. There are a few crucial milliseconds between the moment when you’re consciously aware of a plan to act, and the moment you take action. This brief window is thought by some scientists to be the moment in time when we can exercise free will. It gives us the chance to consciously make a decision, suggesting we aren’t just slaves to our impulses. But, as the New Scientist reports, a study published in Neuroscience of Consciousness last year found that impulsive people have a shorter window of time between their awareness of an impending action and the act itself. Emilie Caspar and Axel Cleeremans from the Free University of Brussels asked 72 people to fill out surveys to determine their level of impulsivity.

The 10 Most Disturbing Books Of All Time In my younger days if I heard a book or movie was disturbing or hard to handle I generally took that as a challenge. Most books generally turned out to not be too bad, but occasionally I’d come across something that would leave me with a sick feeling in my stomach for weeks. I’ve largely outgrown this “genre” of late, but here are my picks for the ten most disturbing books of all time.

Charles Bukowski (Author of Post Office) Henry Charles Bukowski (born as Heinrich Karl Bukowski) was a German-born American poet, novelist and short story writer. His writing was influenced by the social, cultural and economic ambience of his home city of Los Angeles.It is marked by an emphasis on the ordinary lives of poor Americans, the act of writing, alcohol, relationships with women and the drudgery of work. Bukowski wrote thousands of poems, hundreds of short stories and six novels, eventually publishing over sixty books Charles Bukowski was the only child of an American soldier and a German mother. At the age of three, he came with his family to the United States and grew up in Los Angeles. He attended Los Angeles City College from 1939 to 1941, then left school and moved to...moreHenry Charles Bukowski (born as Heinrich Karl Bukowski) was a German-born American poet, novelist and short story writer.

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