background preloader

FREE Rhyming Dictionary - Find Rhyming Words in Seconds

FREE Rhyming Dictionary - Find Rhyming Words in Seconds

http://rhymer.com/

Related:  pinarsahinParole

Guide to Business Cultures Around the World Leadership & Decision Making All levels within a group are consulted before a decision is reached, a practice known as nemawashi. Ringi-sho, or universal consensus, is then sought to arrive at decisions. Japanese managers like to understand the thought process behind proposals. This may cause delays in decision making, but managers are quick to implement solutions. Managers rarely give direct orders and instead indirectly suggest what is needed.

VisuWords Visuwords™ online graphical dictionary — Look up words to find their meanings and associations with other words and concepts. Produce diagrams reminiscent of a neural net. Learn how words associate. What Does Love Mean? When my grandmother got arthritis, she couldn’t bend over and paint her toenails anymore. So my grandfather does it for her all the time, even when his hands got arthritis too. That’s love.

The secrets of body language: why you should never cross your arms again 7K Flares Filament.io 7K Flares × Body language is older and more innate for us as humans than even language or facial expressions. That’s why people born blind can perform the same body language expressions as people who can see.

Compare and Contrast By understanding similarities and differences between two things, we can increase our understanding and learn more about both. This usually involves a process of analysis, in which we compare the specific parts as well as the whole. Comparison may also be a preliminary stage of evaluation. For example, by comparing specific aspects of A and B, we can decide which is more useful or valuable. Many paragraphs whose function is to compare or contrast will begin with an introductory sentence expressed in general terms. Introductory Sentences: Differences

9 Foreign Terms More Awful Than Any English Profanity The great thing about language is that it reveals so much about the speaker. Especially when we're talking about slang -- the fact that every gamer knows what "teabagging" is speaks volumes. That's why two times before we've come up with lists of foreign slang words the English language desperately needs -- some words you hear and think, "That could only have come from ____." But then there's the flip side -- some languages have words for concepts so weird or off-putting that we can thank the stars we don't have any use for them in everyday English.

10 Transformational and Spiritual Aphorisms Throughout the ages, there have been many who have transcended the domain of the ego and had gotten a taste of those delicious higher states of consciousness. Rather than keep their experiential knowledge and wisdom about the higher aspects of existence to themselves, they spread the word to others, be it through spoken word, written works, or other methods. Thanks to the sages, spiritual teachers, and every-day people who had an enlightening experience, we can ignite the light of expanded awareness concerning the higher aspects of the human experience and of existence itself from such people.

The Science of Good Habits and How to Form Them by Gregory Ciotti | Get notified of new posts here. Taking a long term view of success is critical, and it doesn’t take a psychologist to tell you that discipline is how you get from Point A to the sometimes elusive Point B. Or as Aristotle would so aptly put it… We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit. Since that’s the case, how can we actually form good habits and make them stick? Online Etymology Dictionary me (pron.) Old English me (dative), me, mec (accusative); oblique cases of I, from Proto-Germanic *meke (accusative), *mes (dative), cognates: Old Frisian mi/mir, Old Saxon mi, Middle Dutch mi, Dutch mij, Old High German mih/mir, German mich/mir, Old Norse mik/mer, Gothic mik/mis; from PIE root *me-, oblique form of the personal pronoun of the first person singular (nominative *eg; see I); cognates: Sanskrit, Avestan mam, Greek eme, Latin me, mihi, Old Irish me, Welsh mi "me," Old Church Slavonic me, Hittite ammuk. Erroneous or vulgar use for nominative (such as it is me) attested from c. 1500.

HUMOR:Pronunciation Poem I take it you already know of tough and bough and cough and dough? Others may stumble, but not you, on hiccough, thorough, laugh and through. Well done! And now you wish, perhaps, to learn of less familiar traps? Beware of heard, a dreadful word, that looks like beard and sounds like bird. How to Travel to Exotic, Expensive Cities on $50 a Day (Photo: Marc P. Demoz) OK, I’ve had a few short posts recently.

Related:  bquiltnKnowledge is power