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Plot Diagram

Plot Diagram
Download the plug-in tools you need to use our games and tools, or check to see if you've got the latest version. Learn more Looking for ways to engage your students in online literacy learning? Find more interactive tools that help them accomplish a variety of goals-from organizing their thoughts to learning about language. More Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Student Interactives Student Interactive The Plot Diagram is an organizational tool focusing on a pyramid or triangular shape, which is used to map the events in a story. The basic triangle-shaped plot structure, representing the beginning, middle, and end of a story, was described by Aristotle. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Teaching About Story Structure Using Fairy Tales From "once upon a time" to "happily ever after," students learn to recognize story structure in fairy tales and create a logical sequence of events when writing original stories. back to top

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Grammar myths #2: please miss, can I start a sentence with a conjunction? For many of us, our English lessons at school were marked by the stern admonition: ‘Never begin a sentence with a conjunction!’. I was taught this ‘rule’ as a grammatical diktat back in the 1970s, and a quick trawl of the Net shows that the same advice is still being handed down to English students on many websites. And yet perfectly respectable writers employ this disputed usage, and have done since Anglo-Saxon times. Many grammar and usage experts have also tried to squash this myth, but it seems to be set in stone. Here’s my own attempt to chip away at the foundations of this grammatical ‘superstition’ (as Henry Fowler terms such mistaken beliefs).

Crossword Puzzle Maker Instructions: Complete the crossword below We have premade word/clue sets. Or use our Copy-n-Paste Quick Add Feature *NEW* Word List Saving Options Save your entered words for our other puzzle makers! You can save your WORD LIST for later use, or transfer it to other puzzles! Acrostic Poems Grades 7 – 10 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Engineering the Perfect Poem by Using the Vocabulary of STEM Students research engineering careers and create poetry to understand the vocabulary of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Grades 6 – 12 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Making History Come Alive Through Poetry and Song Students compare the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald with the song, “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald,” then create their own poetry about a historical event.

Story Map The Story Map interactive includes a set of graphic organizers designed to assist teachers and students in prewriting and postreading activities. The organizers are intended to focus on the key elements of character, setting, conflict, and resolution development. Students can develop multiple characters, for example, in preparation for writing their own fiction, or they may reflect on and further develop characters from stories they have read. After completing individual sections or the entire organizer, students have the ability to print out their final versions for feedback and assessment. The versatility of this tool allows it to be used in multiple contexts. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson

Elements of a Plot Diagram File: Elements of a Plot Diagram Lindsey Joseph 19303 Views 3361 Downloads 95 Favorites How to Use Quotation Marks Sponsor: Audible.com is the Internet's leading provider of audiobooks, with more than 150,000 downloadable titles across all types of literature, including fiction, nonfiction, and periodicals. For a free trial and free audiobook of your choice, visit AudiblePodcast.com/GG. Quotations can bring your writing to life―the reader imagines someone saying the words―but quotations are also vexing to format. Not only do you have to follow different rules depending on what other punctuation marks you mix with your quotation marks, but people in different countries also follow different rules, so you may see quotation marks handled differently in high-quality publications from different countries. Quotation Marks with Semicolons, Colons, and Dashes First, let’s review the easy (but rare) stuff: semicolons, colons, and dashes always go outside quotation marks:

Children - CADDRA - Canadian ADHD Resource Alliance The information provided on this website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. It is not intended to be a substitute for the care of a physician with expertise in ADHD and its comorbidities. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. CADDRA welcomes all users to the website with the understanding that they agree with all partsof the users agreement for www.caddra.ca. By clicking on the "I ACCEPT" button, you agree to be bound by the terms and conditions of this Agreement.

Bio Cube The Bio Cube interactive has been changed to a new format: the Cube Creator. Summarizing information is an important postreading and prewriting activity that helps students synthesize what they have learned. The interactive Cube Creator offers four options: Bio Cube: This option allows students to develop an outline of a person whose biography or autobiography they have just read; it can also be used before students write their own autobiography. Specific prompts ask students to describe a person's significance, background, and personality.

Alphabet Organizer Engage students and build phonemic awareness by using Alphabet Organizer in the classroom. Students create an alphabet book or alphabet chart with words for each letter of the alphabet. Or choose just one word per letter and upload an image to help early readers make a visual connection between the word and the beginning letter. Alphabet Organizer features our worksaver so that students can save a draft of their unfinished work or share their final work via e-mail. Lesson plans on ReadWriteThink illustrate various examples of how the tool can be used in the classroom; for ideas of how to use it outside the classroom, see Alphabet Organizer in the Parent & Afterschool Resources section. Limited access to computers?

CONJUNCTIONS Conjunctions are words used as joiners. Different kinds of conjunctions join different kinds of grammatical structures. The following are the kinds of conjunctions: Rules for Comma Usage Use a comma to separate the elements in a series (three or more things), including the last two. "He hit the ball, dropped the bat, and ran to first base." You may have learned that the comma before the "and" is unnecessary, which is fine if you're in control of things. However, there are situations in which, if you don't use this comma (especially when the list is complex or lengthy), these last two items in the list will try to glom together (like macaroni and cheese). Using a comma between all the items in a series, including the last two, avoids this problem. This last comma—the one between the word "and" and the preceding word—is often called the serial comma or the Oxford comma.

Guided Meditation Scripts Guided meditation scripts are helpful tools to use for relaxation purposes. A script can vary in length from a word or phrase to many paragraphs. The words will help you remain focused during meditation, so you can aim to stay in the present moment to bring about greater awareness and full consciousness. You can read a meditation script during your session, or record it for future use. Click on the printable PDF on the right to print out the scripts below.

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