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What is a MOOC?

What is a MOOC?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW3gMGqcZQc

Who is taking MOOCs? Teachers, says MIT-Harvard study A new MIT-Harvard study released on Wednesday finds that nearly 40 percent of learners who take open online courses are teachers. That finding has researchers wondering whether they can better design online courses once predicted to upend students’ experience to meet teachers’ needs. The study describes two years of open online courses launched on MIT and Harvard’s non-profit online initiative, edX. How to succeed at Mooc-ing without really trying Heard about MOOCs but far too busy doing more interesting things to sign up to one? Not sure if they’re for you? Feeling pressure to be part of the “mooc crowd”? Keep signing up for MOOCs but keep getting that cba (can’t be a****) feeling after the first week? Fear not, here’s a handy list of tips to ensure you too can get maximum impact, increase your twitter followers, and look like you are at the heart of the next Mooc that takes your fancy.

Massive open online course Poster, entitled "MOOC, every letter is negotiable", exploring the meaning of the words "Massive Open Online Course" A massive open online course (MOOC /muːk/) is an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the web.[1] In addition to traditional course materials such as filmed lectures, readings, and problem sets, many MOOCs provide interactive user forums to support community interactions among students, professors, and teaching assistants (TAs). MOOCs are a recent and widely researched development in distance education which were first introduced in 2006 and emerged as a popular mode of learning in 2012.[2][3] How NOT to Design a MOOC: The Disaster at Coursera and How to Fix it I don’t usually like to title a post with negative connotations, but there is no way to put a positive spin on my experience with the MOOC I’m enrolled in through Coursera, Fundamentals of Online Education: Planning and Application. The course so far is a disaster, ‘a mess’ as numerous students have called it. Ironically, the learning outcome of the course is to create our own online course. To be fair, there are some good points to the course, but there are significant factors contributing to a frustrating course experience for students, myself included.

Better Lessons - Free Lesson Plans math english language arts Kindergarten Counting & Cardinality Operations & Algebraic Thinking Number & Operations in Base Ten MOOC Completion and Retention in the Context of Student Intent Key Takeaways MOOC critics are concerned about low overall completion rates, but these rates are typically evaluated without accounting for student intentions. This study, based on survey and log data from nine HarvardX courses, investigates how completion and attrition rates differ based on students' self-reported intentions about course participation. The study found that, on average among survey respondents, 22 percent of students who intended to complete a course earned a certificate, compared with 6 percent of students who intended to browse a course. Efforts to personalize MOOCs based on self-reported intentions should be conducted with care: many students who do not intend to complete a MOOC do so, and most who do intend to complete a MOOC are not successful.

Inequality in American Education Will Not Be Solved Online - Ian Bogost With funding tight, the state of California has turned to Udacity to provide MOOCs for students enrolled in remedial courses. But what is lost when public education is privatized? Unlit road at night (MRBECK/Flickr) One night recently, it was raining hard as I drove to pick my son up from an evening class at the Atlanta Ballet. Like many cities, Atlanta's roads are in terrible condition after years of neglect. Lane divider paint is so worn as to become invisible in the wet darkness, potholes litter the pavement.

The MOOC Guide The purpose of this document is two-fold: - to offer an online history of the development of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) - to use that history to describe major elements of a MOOC Each chapter of this guide looks at one of the first MOOCs and some early influences. It contains these parts: - a description of the MOOC, what it did, and what was learned - a description of the element of MOOC theory learned in the offering of the course - practical tools that can be used to develop that aspect of a MOOC - practical tips on how to be successful Contribute to this Book You are invited to contribute. If you participated in a MOOC, add a paragraph describing your experience (you can sign your name to it, so we know it's a personal story).

Warming Up to MOOC's [This is a guest post by Douglas H. Fisher, an associate professor of computer science and of computer engineering at Vanderbilt University.--@jbj] In Fall 2011, Stanford announced three, free massively open online courses, or MOOCs. Two of these courses, database and machine learning, corresponded to spring 2012 courses that I would be teaching at Vanderbilt University. I recognized that I could use the lecture materials from these classes to “flip” my own classes by having students view lectures before the class meeting, which then could be used for other learning activities.

Best Apps for Teaching & Learning 2017 Touchcast Studio by Touchcast Level: Middle School + Platform: iOS Website Touchcast is truly “a TV studio in your hands.” MOOC retention: A survey study JavaScript is disabled on your browser. Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page. Highlights Measuring the Success of Online Education One of the dirty secrets about MOOCs — massive open online courses — is that they are not very effective, at least if you measure effectiveness in terms of completion rates. If as few as 20 percent of students finishing an online course is considered a wild success and 10 percent and lower is standard, then it would appear that MOOCs are still more of a hobby than a viable alternative to traditional classroom education. Backers reason that the law of large numbers argues in favor of the online courses that have rapidly come to be seen as the vehicle for the Internet’s next big disruption — colleges. If 100,000 students take a free online course and only 5,000 complete it, that is still a significant number.

Course: bonkopen2012: Instructional Ideas and Technology Tools for Online Success CourseSites by Blackboard Instructional Ideas and Technology Tools for Online Success Free, Open Course With Dr. Curt Bonk: The live course had ended, but please enjoy the course at your own pace! Description: Motivating students and creating community within blended and online learning environments are crucial to academic achievement and success.

Two Weeks With Udacity - Casting Out Nines One of my professional plans for this semester was to take two of Stanford University’s massively-open online courses (“MOOC” for short), one on Introduction to Computer Science and the other on Cryptography. I had planned on taking these, that is, until the courses started suffering repeated delays. The last email I received from Stanford cited “legal and administrative issues” that have pushed the Cryptography course — which was originally slated to start in January — back into March, and the CS course that was originally scheduled for late February has also failed to materialize. I think I’ll be writing a separate blog post regarding what I think about these delays and what it might mean for Stanford.

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