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Connecting scientists, journalists, and communicators

Connecting scientists, journalists, and communicators
Risk, Uncertainty, Climate Change, and ‘March Madness’ Americans’ fascination with college basketball’s ‘March Madness’ may shed light on the analytical skills they can apply to addressing challenges posed by a warming climate. MIT Scientist: An Obligation to Take on ‘Tail Risk’ vs. Alarmism Respected MIT scientist Kerry Emanuel takes on the sometimes dicey issue of ‘tail risk’ and explains why he thinks it important for the science community to discuss it … notwithstanding inevitable risks of doing so. (Reposted with permission.)

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Green Button: Enabling Energy Innovation Posted by Monisha Shah and Nick Sinai on May 02, 2013 at 09:12 AM EDT This article is cross-posted from the Council on Environmental Quality blog Last year, in response to the Obama Administration’s call to action, 35 utilities and energy providers committed to provide 36 million homes and businesses with their own energy usage information in the consensus, industry-standard Green Button format. Not only are utilities implementing Green Button Download My Data across the country for homes and businesses to securely download their information, but utilities in California and the Mid-Atlantic are beginning to implement Green Button Connect My Data functionality— making it easier for their customers to securely transfer their own energy usage data to authorized third parties, based on affirmative (opt-in) customer consent and control.

Saul Griffith: Climate Change Recalculated Good evening. How are we for signal, very good, I am Stewart Brand from the Long Now Foundation. You maybe wonder what this Twitter thing is about. This data, it turns out is helpful helpful for funders of Long Now and of these talks. Why is it so cold if the Earth is warming? (video) Dr. Jeff Masters from Weather Underground drops some science on those who think they can conclude that the planet isn't warming because "it's so cold this winter!" Interestingly, cold isn't the only abnormal weather pattern for North-America right now. There's also historic warm temperatures in Alaska, and the deepest drought in decades across the west... You really have to see the graphics and listen to the interview - it's great - but the general idea is that sometimes the Jet Stream slows down and shifts South, allowing very cold arctic air to come down over most of Canada and the US.

Antarctica Sea Creatures - Bizarre Sea Creatures of Antarctica Also called a sea cucumber or Holothuroid, this truly deserves the name sea pig. This was one of the most common and abundant animals caught off the coast of Antarctica by the international research team aboard the BAS Royal Research Ship James Clark Ross. Sea cucumbers are important in processing the sediment (like earthworms on land) but their numbers worldwide have been threatened by recent fisheries. "Few people realize just how rich in biodiversity the Southern Ocean is – even a single trawl can reveal a fascinating array of weird and wonderful creatures as would be seen on a coral reef. These animals are potentially very good indicators of environmental change as many occur in the shallows, which are changing fast, but also in deeper water which will warm much less quickly," said research cruise leader Dr.

Isaac Held's Blog 44. Heat uptake and internal variability — part II I’m returning to an argument discussed in post #16 regarding the decomposition of the global mean warming into a part that is forced and a part that is due to internal variability. I am not looking here for the optimal way of doing this decomposition.

How farmers can help fight climate change The other week, I spent some time interviewing several business leaders for the North Carolina Sustainability CEnter, asking them about their reactions to President Obama's climate speach. Their responses were decidedly mixed, but one discussion stayed with me. When I asked Charles Sydnor, the owner of Braeburn Farm, about the urgency of climate policy for his industry—he had this to say:

Hot Alaska, Cold Georgia: How The Shifted Polar Vortex Turned Winter Upside-Down By Ryan Koronowski "Hot Alaska, Cold Georgia: How The Shifted Polar Vortex Turned Winter Upside-Down" A photo released Wednesday Jan. 29, 2014, by the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities and made on Jan. 25, 2014, shows road crews beginning the job of clearing the closed Richardson Highway, near Valdez, Alaska. CREDIT: AP Photo/Alaska DOT&PF It’s easy to forget about other places in the world, or even in your own country, when you’re out shoveling snow, or people who are homeless suffer the worst of urban cold snaps, or harbor seals on the Hudson River ride ice floes, or your city shuts down due to a mismanaged winter storm.

Japanese breakthrough will make wind power cheaper than nuclear NOTE: Some major wind projects like the proposed TWE Carbon Valley project in Wyoming are already pricing in significantly lower than coal power -- $80 per MWh for wind versus $90 per MWh for coal -- and that is without government subsidies using today's wind turbine technology. The International Clean Energy Analysis (ICEA) gateway estimates that the U.S. possesses 2.2 million km2 of high wind potential (Class 3-7 winds) — about 850,000 square miles of land that could yield high levels of wind energy. This makes the U.S. something of a Saudi Arabia for wind energy, ranked third in the world for total wind energy potential.

Ethics in Climate Change — Rock Ethics Institute "If we did not take action to solve this crisis, it could indeed threaten the future of human civilization...I believe it's deadly accurate. But again, we can solve it." Al Gore According to the Environmental Justice Foundation, every year climate change is attributable for the deaths of over 300,000 people, seriously affects a further 325 million people, and causes economic losses of US $125 billion. 'Debate on Science is Over, Time to Act Is Now': World Reacts to IPCC Report The new report further states that greenhouse gas emissions at or above current rates would induce changes in the oceans, ice caps, glaciers, the biosphere, and other components of the climate system. (Underlying photo: UNEP)Following the release of the IPCC's first installment of its fifth assessment report (AR5) on climate change in Stockholm on Friday, environmental groups, experts, and activists from around the world were reacting to the findings contained in the report and commenting on the implications it will or should have as the planet faces the "unprecedented" rate of global warming and the irrefutable consensus by the world's scientific community. For most, the report's findings represent only a more precise and updated affirmation of what has been known to most experts for decades. What follows is a sampling of those reactions and perspective from those on the frontline of the climate issue. Climate campaign movement leader 350.org:

California's Recent Droughts Have Grown Longer And Stronger By Joe Romm "California’s Recent Droughts Have Grown Longer And Stronger" The good news: Parts of California are finally getting some much needed precipitation. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Climate Resrouces Americans’ health, security, and economic well-being are tied to climate and weather. In the last 2 years, the United States experienced 25 climate- and weather-related disasters that claimed 1,141 lives and each exceeded $1 billion ($175 billion total) in damages. The public, businesses, resource managers, and policy leaders are increasingly asking for information to help them understand how and why climate conditions are changing and how they can prepare. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a primary provider of climate science, data, tools, and information used by stakeholders and citizens in decision-making contexts.

Wealthy nations pledged billions to help the poor adapt to climate change. Where did it all go? One of the cruel ironies of climate change is that the poor countries that have contributed the least to the problem are expected to get hit the hardest. A woman and her children walk to the Transit Center to find water in Dolo Ado, Ethiopia. More than 300,000 refugees fled severe drought, conflict and famine in southern Somalia in 2011 into Ethiopia and Kenya (William Davies / AFP/Getty Images) That's why, in recent years, many of the world's wealthier nations — including the United States, Germany, Britain, and Japan — have promised billions of dollars in aid to help developing countries adapt to the impacts of global warming and switch over to cleaner energy sources. In 2009, these nations pledged $30 billion in "fast start" climate finance over the next three years, with a promise to scale that up to $100 billion per year in aid from both public and private sources by 2020.

Global Analysis - Annual 2013 Maps and Time Series Temperature and Precipitation Maps Annual Temperature Anomalies Time Series

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