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Listening exams

Listening exams

http://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/exams/listening-exams/listening-exams

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Where did English come from? - Claire Bowern There are two other TED-Ed lessons related to this topic: How languages evolve and How did English evolve? (a lesson that fills in some of the details that we omit here due to the fact that the focus of this lesson was further in the past). There is still a great deal of debate about Indo-European, most importantly about the location of the homeland. To read more about this debate, there are classic books by Mallory and Renfrew, as well more recent works by Anthony. Socialising 4: Active listening Perhaps the most important skill connected with socialising is to ‘shut up and listen’. In practice, it can be very difficult to resist the temptation to turn every conversation into a conversation about what we consider the most interesting thing in the world, i.e. ourselves. The most skilful active listeners include nurses, social workers, psychotherapists and counsellors, so this lesson focuses especially on the techniques studied and used by these professionals.

Commonly Used American Idioms - LinkEngPark Home » Series » Watch&Learn » L2: Commonly Used American Idioms American Idioms is a great video series with English subtitles for English learners. All of the explanations are in English, so it might be challenging for you, but just try to imagine the meanings in your head and study hard and soon you’ll be able to use these idioms in your conversations. American Idioms: Literacy In The Digital Age Editor’s Note: Teaching Channel has partnered with Student Achievement Partners on a blog series about digital literacy tools and their effective use by educators. The majority of the tools mentioned in this post and the four earlier posts in our series, transform the student experience from passive consumers of information to active creators of content, employing multiple English Language Arts standards and skills along the way. We firmly believe this ought to be the new norm in the modern classroom. Kids have access to information; we must teach them how to navigate a world constantly evolving where content is at their fingertips. The traditional application of ELA isn’t enough for future-ready learners.

25 maps that explain the English language by Libby Nelson on March 3, 2015 English is the language of Shakespeare and the language of Chaucer. It's spoken in dozens of countries around the world, from the United States to a tiny island named Tristan da Cunha. It reflects the influences of centuries of international exchange, including conquest and colonization, from the Vikings through the 21st century. Here are 25 maps and charts that explain how English got started and evolved into the differently accented languages spoken today. The origins of English

Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have written several books, including Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching: Connecting Mind, Brain, and Education Research to Classroom Practice. Students who succeed academically often rely on being able to think effectively and independently in order to take charge of their learning. These students have mastered fundamental but crucial skills such as keeping their workspace organized, completing tasks on schedule, making a plan for learning, monitoring their learning path, and recognizing when it might be useful to change course.

Listening Listening Lessons Dogs, Dogs, Dogs - Idioms and phrases using the word 'Dog'. Get the phone! - A listening exercise. Listen to the phone conversation and then answer the questions. Listening Exercise: The Birthday Party - A listening exercise. L1: Listen to English - ESL British Podcasts - LinkEngPark Home » Series » Listening Series » Listen&Read » L&R Series » L1: Listen to English – ESL British Podcasts Listen to English – ESL British Podcasts help you to improve your English vocabulary and pronunciation and your listening skills. They are quite short (5 or 6 minutes) and delivered in clearly spoken English. Many of them are linked to grammar and vocabulary notes, or to exercises or quizes. Listen to English – ESL British Podcasts Dogs must be carried on the escalatorMid-life CrisisThe King under the Car ParkSchool dinnersDull and BoringTitanicEngland’s Newest Tourist AttractionGoing to the DogsLord Lucan cannot copeSinging in the rainScott of the AntarcticThe New PandasThe Scariest Day of the YearGreyfriars BobbySwimming in the River ThamesI Go Without my BreakfastGood manners, bad mannersSpotting TigersDomesdayThe GrauniadA Nice Cup of TeaThe launchHow many of us are there?

10 lifesaving websites for ESL teachers Lisa has asked me for some recommendations regarding useful sites for EFL teachers and I’m happy to make a little compilation of the places I visit most often to find ideas, inspirations, betimes lesson plans if I feel exceptionally lazy (The Liberation of the Garden Gnomes by Peter Vahle is just shiny!) and share them with you. So, here we go – my ten favourite websites: Helping IELTS Students Practice Phonetics at Home for Free IELTS Pronunciation If you look at the IELTS speaking marking criteria, you will notice that pronunciation makes up 25% of the total marks. In other words, it is difficult get a high band score in your speaking test without good pronunciation. Many students believe that good pronunciation is the same as having a ‘native English accent’. This is one of the most common misconceptions and students should not worry about having a British or American accent. According to the marking criteria, it is more important to be:

Growth mindset for students… I recently saw Robert MacMillan (@robfmac) tweet about Growth Mindsets and a resource he had typed up and shared in different formats: As someone who is trying to develop their sketchnoting skills I thought I’d have a go at creating my own version of it using Paper by 53. When done, I wasn’t too overly happy with the title, so I used the Creative Cloud tie-in and sent the finished piece to Photoshop and added a new title written using the lovely Amatic SC font. One of the great features of Paper is the ‘Mix’ sharing ecosystem that it provides allowing for others to share their work so that it can be remixed. I cannot take credit for the lovely lightbulb that sits on the top left hand corner. That was created by Rachel Haynes whose website is here and Mix profile is here.

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