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21st Century Fluencies

21st Century Fluencies
The Essential Fluencies The Essential Fluencies of innovative learning are structured processes for developing the skills that your students need to succeed, today and in the future. Get Started Now “The Essential Fluencies have nothing to do with hardware—they are about headware, and heartware!” Solution Fluency Develop problem-solving superpowers Learn More Information Fluency Learn Sherlock-style data skills Learn More Creativity Fluency Unleash your inner Picasso Learn More Media Fluency Be the next Spielberg Learn More Collaboration Fluency Bring together unstoppable teams Learn More Global Digital Citizenship Be global, and be great Learn More Experience the Solution Fluency Activity Planner. Get Started Now! Pin It on Pinterest Shares Share This BESbswy

https://globaldigitalcitizen.org/21st-century-fluencies

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How To Make Students Better Online Researchers I recently came across an article in Wired Magazine called “ Why Kids Can’t Search “. I’m always interested in this particular topic, because it’s something I struggle with in my middle and high school classes constantly, and I know I’m not alone in my frustrations. Getting kids to really focus on what exactly they are searching for, and then be able to further distill idea into a few key specific search terms is a skill that we must teach students, and we have to do it over and over again. Digital citizenship / Teaching Netsafe – Learn Guide Protect The myLGP website supports the Learn Guide Protect Framework . The site promotes a student-centred approach to teaching and learning about cybersafety and digital citizenship across the curriculum. Developed by NetSafe, in collaboration with New Zealand teachers. NetSafe kit for schools A comprehensive programme of cybersafety for schools based upon infrastructure of policies, procedures and use agreements, an effective electronic security system, and a comprehensive cybersafety education programme.

Digital Citizenship in Education and the Classroom Tomorrow, I am attending a workshop, the objective of which is to develop a curriculum focused upon digital citizenship. I have been pondering digital citizenship and social media the last few days. This evening I brought together some of the relevant articles that I have read and tagged on the topic in the past, both recently and further back in time. This process resulted in this post. Curating digital citizenship through education During the last seven years I have been teaching educators how to establish a web presence and establish blogs.

Infographics for Educators We live in a world of quick consumption, bite-size morsels of information, and visualizations of just about everything. All of this has become boiled down into the uber-popular infographic. They pop up from time to time on Edudemic and I often have a tough time determining if I should actually run versus another. Scope & Sequence Get Trained Use our professional development resources to learn best practices for teaching digital citizenship to your students. Onboard Students: Digital Passport Introduce students in grades 3-5 to Digital Passport, our award-winning suite of games that help onboard students to the foundational skills of digital citizenship and Internet safety.

Getting Sneaky About Digital Citizenship – DigCit Institute Article reposted with permission from nancywtech.com Dear Teachers, I met with a librarian friend of mine today to brainstorm ways to get digital citizenship embedded in lots of different areas of her school. She confided to me that she wanted to INFILTRATE her school with her digital citizenship efforts. Isn’t that a great word? Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? “Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu last week. 1. BE FLEXIBLE.

Digital Citizenship Week You don't want kids learning about the birds and the bees on the playground. And when it comes to navigating social media, online games, smartphones, and the Internet, it's best for kids to get their info from a trusted source. With 92 percent of teens going online daily and nearly three-quarters of kids age 0–8 using apps, having The Talk is an essential rite of passage. As parents and educators, we want to raise kids to be safe, responsible, and ethical in the digital world.

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