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Modeling Reading and Analysis Processes with the Works of Edgar Allan Poe. ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals.

More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Student Objectives Session One Session Two Session Three Session Four Sessions Five and Six Session Seven Student Assessment/Reflections Students will explore reading strategies using the think-aloud process. identify literary devices and techniques. analyze Poe's poems and short stories. investigate connections between the life and writings of Edgar Allan Poe. compare different versions of "The Raven. " back to top Session One Session Two Session Three Session Four Sessions Five and Six. Mark Twain: A Skeptic's Progress The Morgan Library & Museum Online Exhibitions - Selected items | Photographs Mark Twain: A Skeptic's Progress September 17, 2010, through January 2, 2011 Photograph of Mark Twain, dated 1904 (taken the day he buried his wife) taken by Isabel Lyon.

The Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations. Samuel L. Clemens was born on November 30, 1835. He adopted the pseudonym Mark Twain in 1863, working as a newspaper reporter on the American frontier. To celebrate the 175th anniversary of his birth, The Morgan Library & Museum, in partnership with The New York Public Library, presents the iconic author's manuscripts, letters, drawings, books, original illustrations for his books, and posed and candid photographs. This online presentation includes a selection of works from the exhibition.

This exhibition is generously supported by the Margaret T. Transcendentalism - ENH241. Characteristics of Transcendentalism Nature: provides mystery, symbolism, and signs to those with a curious appetite Importance of Self: knowing oneself allows an individual to receive knowledge about other wordly/spiritual ideas Spirituality and Balance: finding the harmony between the universe and its worldy and societal beliefs, as well as, the individual self and its personal, inner beliefs Reuben, Paul P. "Chapter 4: American Transcendentalism: A Brief Introduction. " PAL: Perspectives in American Literature- A Research and Reference Guide . Web. 4 June 2010. Link to Map 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. The Jilting of Granny Weatherall | etext. The Jilting of Granny Weatherall By Katherine Anne Porter She flicked her wrist neatly out of Doctor Harry’s pudgy careful fingers and pulled the sheet up to her chin.

The brat ought to be in knee breeches. Doctoring around the country with spectacles on his nose! “Get along now. Take your schoolbooks and go. There’s nothing wrong with me.” Doctor Harry spread a warm paw like a cushion on her forehead where the forked green vein danced and made her eyelids twitch.

“That’s no way to speak to a woman nearly eighty years old just because she’s down. “Well, Missy, excuse me.” “Don’t tell me what I’m going to be. Her bones felt loose, and floated around in her skin, and Doctor Harry floated like a balloon around the foot of the bed. “Get along and doctor your sick,” said Granny Weatherall. She meant to wave good-by, but it was too much trouble.

“She was never like this, never like this!” Well, and what if she was? “What’d you say, mother?” Granny felt her face tying up in hard knots. “I do. F. Scott Fitzgerald. USC: F.Scott Fitzgerald Centenary Home Page. EMERSON - NATURE--Web text. Edgar Allan Poe. Poe's Library. SECRETS OF THE DEAD . The Witches Curse. The trouble in Salem began during the cold, dark Massachusetts winter, in January of 1692.

Eight young girls began to take ill, begining with 9-year-old Elizabeth Parris, the daughter of Reverend Samuel Parris, and his niece, 11-year-old Abigail Williams. But theirs was a strange sickness: the girls suffered from delirium, violent convulsions, incomprehensible speech, trance-like states, and odd skin sensations. The worried villagers searched desperately for an explanation. Their conclusion: the girls were under a spell, bewitched -- and, worse yet, by members of their own pious community.

And then the finger pointing began. The first to be accused were Tituba, Parris's Caribbean-born slave, along with Sarah Good and Sarah Osburn, two elderly women considered of ill repute. On October 29, by order of Massachusetts Governor Sir William Phips, the Salem witch trials officially ended. Arthur Miller - None Without Sin | American Masters. In the period immediately following the end of World War II, American theater was transformed by the work of playwright Arthur Miller. Profoundly influenced by the Depression and the war that immediately followed it, Miller tapped into a sense of dissatisfaction and unrest within the greater American psyche.

His probing dramas proved to be both the conscience and redemption of the times, allowing people an honest view of the direction the country had taken. Arthur Miller was born in Manhattan in 1915 to Jewish immigrant parents. By 1928, the family had moved to Brooklyn, after their garment manufacturing business began to fail. Witnessing the societal decay of the Depression and his father’s desperation due to business failures had an enormous effect on Miller.

After graduating, Miller returned to New York, where he worked as a freelance writer. Only two years after the success of “All My Sons,” Miller came out with his most famous and well-respected work, “Death of a Salesman.” Map of Salem Village | 1692 | Interactive Timeline. Salem Massachusetts - Salem Witch Trials The Stones: July 10 and July 19, 1692.