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West Point Bridge Designer

West Point Bridge Designer

Engineering The American Engineers' Council for Professional Development (ECPD, the predecessor of ABET)[1] has defined "engineering" as: The creative application of scientific principles to design or develop structures, machines, apparatus, or manufacturing processes, or works utilizing them singly or in combination; or to construct or operate the same with full cognizance of their design; or to forecast their behavior under specific operating conditions; all as respects an intended function, economics of operation or safety to life and property.[2][3] One who practices engineering is called an engineer, and those licensed to do so may have more formal designations such as Professional Engineer, Designated Engineering Representative, Chartered Engineer, Incorporated Engineer, Ingenieur or European Engineer. History[edit] Engineering has existed since ancient times as humans devised fundamental inventions such as the pulley, lever, and wheel. Ancient era[edit] Renaissance era[edit] Modern era[edit]

Weird Science Kids Einstein’s Secret to Amazing Problem Solving (and 10 Specific Ways You Can Use It) Einstein is quoted as having said that if he had one hour to save the world he would spend fifty-five minutes defining the problem and only five minutes finding the solution. This quote does illustrate an important point: before jumping right into solving a problem, we should step back and invest time and effort to improve our understanding of it. Here are 10 strategies you can use to see problems from many different perspectives and master what is the most important step in problem solving: clearly defining the problem in the first place! The Problem Is To Know What the Problem Is The definition of the problem will be the focal point of all your problem-solving efforts. What most of us don’t realize — and what supposedly Einstein might have been alluding to — is that the quality of the solutions we come up with will be in direct proportion to the quality of the description of the problem we’re trying to solve. Problem Definition Tools and Strategies 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Web 2.0 Tools World Wide Web sites that use technology beyond the static pages of earlier Web sites A tag cloud (a typical Web 2.0 phenomenon in itself) presenting Web 2.0 themes Web 2.0 (also known as participative (or participatory)[1] web and social web)[2] refers to websites that emphasize user-generated content, ease of use, participatory culture and interoperability (i.e., compatible with other products, systems, and devices) for end users. The term was coined by Darcy DiNucci in 1999[3] and later popularized by Tim O'Reilly and Dale Dougherty at the first O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 Conference in late 2004.[4][5][6] Although the term mimics the numbering of software versions, it does not denote a formal change in the nature of the World Wide Web, but merely describes a general change that occurred during this period as interactive websites proliferated and came to overshadow the older, more static websites of the original Web.[7] History[edit] Web 1.0[edit] Characteristics[edit] Web 2.0[edit] Search Tags

Gear Generator Animation: * Shift + Enter: Set RPM of the selected gear #0 - N8 - ratio: 1:1 - RPM: 6#1 - N16 - ratio: 2:1 - RPM: 3#2 - N12 - ratio: 2:1 - RPM: 3#3 - N60 - ratio: 10:1 - RPM: 0.6 Connection properties Gear properties * Shift + Enter: modifies the Diametral pitch Download Display Units Gear Generator is unitless: if you wish it's inches, cm or millimeters. About Gear Generator is a tool for creating involute spur gears and download them in DXF or SVG format. Why this tool was created? Support: abel@iparigrafika.hu Notes about browser compatibility: all new major browsers are supported (i didn't tested IE), but unfortunately Chrome can't render SVG circle correctly. The downloaded DXF file can be opened with AutoCad 2013 or newer versions. Update 1.5: Fixed DXF resolution issue. Update 1.4: TA-DA: Added internal gear support, and the ability of positioning the first gear. Update 1.3: Fixed DXF file format. On YouTube Check out other tools I made:Print Charts, Flip.World, HTML Spirograph.

Simple machine Table of simple mechanisms, from Chambers' Cyclopedia, 1728.[1] Simple machines provide a "vocabulary" for understanding more complex machines. A simple machine is a non-motorized device that changes the direction or magnitude of a force.[2] In general, a simple machine can be defined as one of the simplest mechanisms that provide mechanical advantage (also called leverage).[3] Usually the term refers to the six classical simple machines which were defined by Renaissance scientists:[4] Various authors have compiled lists of simple machines and machine elements, sometimes lumping them together under a single term such as "simple machines",[1] "basic machines",[6] "compound machines",[8] or "machine elements"; the use of the term "simple machines" in this broader sense is a departure from the neoclassical sense of the six essential simple machines, which is why many authors prefer to avoid its use, preferring the other terms (such as "machine element"). History[edit] Compound machine[edit]

Reeko's Mad Scientist Lab Project Based Learning (image from education-world.com) Project Based Learning (PBL) is a great way to teach students content, 21st century skills, and engage them in something fun and educational. I spoke more about PBL in an earlier blog ( and we had some great reader comments (Tech&Learning, May 2009, page 14). Today I'd like to give some tips and ideas on how to get started with PBL in your classroom. First of all, PBL can be used in any classroom, in any subject, at any grade level. PBL does take planning. For instance, I teach physics and developed a project for my classes on structures and stress and strain. Another example of PBL is having the students research a topic and present it to the rest of the class through a multimedia presentation, website, or poster. Start small. Another idea for projects is to look at your school or community and see what they need. Some web resources to get you started:

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