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The Coolest Elevator in New York

The Coolest Elevator in New York
Last week, I was scouting office space in a building in Queens. My guide brought me to this totally unassuming elevator: Really, I have to show you this as I encountered it: WOW. It’s like Willy Wonka built an elevator to the land of Oz! Easily the coolest elevator I’ve ever been on in New York: Here’s a full panorama looking toward the rear of the elevator (that’s a railing beneath the mirror)… …and a reverse pan showing the front: Lining the ceiling are these great monster heads made out of mechanical bits… Each is poking through its own hole: More characters, including a king: Another character: The elevator is a last remnant from when the former Macy’s warehouse building catered to a more artsy clientele. Best of all, there’s a cool fish-eye mirror at one end, which makes it look like you’re leaning out of some parallel dimension: PS – One other installation was left in the lobby – a school bus, apparently paused in the midst of an avant-garde crash:

Designcollector™ Moscow raised and StPete based awesome artist and photographer Anka Zhuravleva invites you to be mesmerized by her latest photo-artwork series “Distorted Gravity”. Overhead + Under Bed = Space-Saving Shelving & Storage Saving space is not something we do for its own sake – in this case, a cutting-edge media room was the goal, and cleverly lofting and concealing of books, CDs and DVDs provided the floor space to make this dream den a reality. Johan wanted to use ever spare bit of wall surface for a larger television and smaller wall-mounted computer screen – no dressers and few shelves getting in the way, nor objects behind the couch to cramp the distance between seating and screens. Wrap-around shelving features thicker top and bottom borders, creating a dynamic series of stripes that animate and decorate the space – being pushed out from the wall, these in turn allow for under-shelf indirect lighting in addition to a central overhead light fixture. Audiophiles and film fanatics may find this cozy corner nook to be of secondary concern, but its existence enables the rest of the open-plan redesign … and for those of us who like little lofts and interior hideaways, it looks like a lovely space to read.

Architecture Imagine the renovation dilemmas. A huge penthouse of a converted 1930s office building in TriBeCa, New York, is to be turned into a functioning home for a family with three teenagers. In fact, we can not quite imagine the issues that faced Steven Harris Architects when the family showed up, literally, at the doorstep of the celebrated architect and asked if he’d like to work on their home. Harris said yes and proceeded to make his magic. Dream Worlds Revealed On Canvas Along with some magnificent dreams, Jacek Yerka finds inspiration for his masterful paintings from his childhood memories: the places, remembered feelings and smells of 1950′s Poland. He studied fine art and graphic design before becoming a full time artist in 1980… and we’re glad he did. His paintings will take you through incredible worlds of imagination, bending reality in captivating and clever ways fit to inspire a novel or film. See many more examples of his find paintings at

- StumbleUpon (click images for detail) For the better part of three decades multidisciplinary artist Guy Laramee has worked as a stage writer, director, composer, a fabricator of musical instruments, a singer, sculptor, painter and writer. Among his sculptural works are two incredible series of carved book landscapes and structures entitled Biblios and The Great Wall, where the dense pages of old books are excavated to reveal serene mountains, plateaus, and ancient structures. Of these works he says: Netflix Envelope Doodles Admit it, you've done it. You've taken a Sharpie to a Netflix envelope and doodled the heck out of it. Not just once, but a multitude of times.

Lofted Space-Saving Furniture for Bedroom Interiors Tumidei is more than just a furniture company – they construct modern and relatively inexpensive (no, not cheap) pieces of furniture that they also create compositions from – interior design photos that you can use to shape your own space. These lofted bedroom interiors are brilliantly varied and are great space-saving solutions for cramped bedrooms. A lot of these lofted interiors are clearly designed for children and teens in terms of sizes, colors and material quality. They incorporate elements needed for a student office, plenty of clothing, game and toy storage and stairs that older people might not be as eager to climb. For a small space (and a small person) one could really see the appeal of fitting everything in.

15 Awesome And Inspiring Offices I’m sure you’ve seen this office plenty of times on the internet. This office is all about fun: it has a lot of specially decorated rooms in which employees can do their work. There’s even a game room for relaxation and a gym where you can work out. Check it out: The Selgas Cano Architecture office, designed by Iwan Baan, makes you feel like a part of nature. Portraits of giant insects ... that are actually stunning close-ups of tiny creepy-crawlies By Mike O'brien Updated: 14:39 GMT, 4 December 2011 Nobody really likes insects, bar a few cranks, natural historians and curious toddlers. But these amazing images lend them the kind of pictorial beauty normally reserved for fluffy kittens. Salvador Dalí Illustrates Alice in Wonderland, 1969 By Maria Popova UPDATE: The best illustrations from 150 years of Alice in Wonderland Last week, we marveled at Leonard Weisgard’s stunning illustrations for the first color edition of Alice in Wonderland, circa 1949.

Intricately Patterned Animal Illustrations It would be hard to tell from these strikingly detailed animals but artist Iain Macarthur got his start drawing cartoon characters. Now he carries his sketchbook on the bus, to the cafe and everywhere else as he includes more realism and in this case pattern in his illustrations. See more of his animals (and even some cartoons) at TetraBox Light by Ed Chew Liquid to Light Designer Ed Chew takes a green step in the right direction with the TetraBox lamp, a light object made from discarded drink packets that would have otherwise ended up in landfills already packed to the brim. The design is achieved by unfolding the packets and refolding them into hexagonal and pentagonal sections that are then pieced together to form a geodesic sphere or any other desired shape. Here, the Epcot-like ball makes an attractive overhead light and casts an impressive web of shadows and shapes on the surrounding space. Designer: Ed Chew

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