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BookGlutton - Social Reading

BookGlutton - Social Reading
Related:  1.5.2 Books Engdleco

ChestofBooks.com: Read Books Online for Free AWS Official Blog Have you ever taken the time to watch the access and error logs from your web server scroll past? In addition to legitimate well-formed requests from users and spiders, you will probably see all sorts of unseemly and downright scary requests far too often. For example, I checked the logs for one of my servers and found that someone or something was looking for popular packages that are often installed at well-known locations (I have changed the source IP address to 10.11.12.217 for illustrative purposes): If any of those probes had succeeded, the attacker could then try a couple of avenues to gain access to my server. They could run through a list of common (or default) user names and passwords, or they could attempt to exploit a known system, language, or application vulnerability (perhaps powered by SQL injection or cross-site request forgery) as the next step. Like it or not, these illegitimate requests are going to be flowing in 24×7. Conditions inspect incoming requests. — Jeff;

Authorama - Public Domain Books RSS Readers (RSS Info) RSS Readers RSS and Atom files provide news updates from a website in a simple form for your computer. You read these files in a program called an aggregator, which collects news from various websites and provides it to you in a simple form. But what aggregator to use? Top Picks Mac OS X: NetNewsWire This elegant Mac-like aggregator is easy to use and powerful. Windows: SharpReader Simple, but gets the job done. Linux: Liferea A simple Gtk newsreader. Runners-Up AmphetaDesk A news aggregator you access through a web browser. FeedDemon A more complicated aggregator for Windows. FeedReader Like SharpReader, but sporadically updated. News Is Free Lets you create your own customized news page with feeds from the sites you're interested in.

The Online Books Page: Search Examples: Entering austen, jane in the Author field finds books by Jane Austen. Entering Baum in the Author field and and oz in the Title field finds L. Frank Baum's Oz books. Entering dosto in the Author field, choosing the Exact start of name option, and entering underground in the Title field finds Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Notes from the Underground, even if you don't remember how to spell more than the start of the author's name! (Hey, we've changed the spelling in our own database at least once.) If you have an old browser that does not understand forms, the old author search and title search are still available. Home -- Search -- New Listings -- Authors -- Titles -- Subjects -- Serials Books -- News -- Features -- Archives -- The Inside Story Edited by John Mark Ockerbloom (onlinebooks@pobox.upenn.edu) OBP copyrights and licenses

Warehouse Deals | Deep Discounts on Open-Box, and Used Products from Amazon Booktrope.com | Freedom of the Book Easily Find Anything You Want On eBay, Amazon, Etsy, And Craigslist With RSS Do you ever find yourself wanting a hard-to-find game, comic book or electronic part? Manually searching through Amazon, eBay, or Craigslist can waste a tremendous amount of your time – so why keep acting like a sucker? You can get notifications automatically delivered to you on virtually anything sold on Etsy, Craigslist, Amazon or eBay. This article details how to get RSS feeds for Etsy, Craigslist, Amazon and eBay. Amazon RSS Feeds Amazon includes a variety of RSS links to all their major product categories. To get started, simply copy-and-paste the link into your favorite reader. If you haven’t heard of Feedly, you can read up on it here. Customized eBay Advanced Search Feeds eBay offers one of the most sophisticated methods of creating RSS feeds: Any completed search using the advanced search feature can be converted into an RSS feed. I then copy-and-paste the URL, including the “&_RSS=1” at the end, into my feed reader. How-to Use Etsy’s RSS Feeds Or:

O'Reilly Open Books Project O'Reilly has published a number of Open Books--books with various forms of "open" copyright--over the years. The reasons for "opening" copyright, as well as the specific license agreements under which they are opened, are as varied as our authors. Perhaps a book was outdated enough to be put out of print, yet some people still needed the information it covered. Or the author or subject of a book felt strongly that it should be published under a particular open copyright. But there's more to making Open Books available online than simply adopting an open license or giving up rights granted under copyright law. We're happy to have partnered with two innovative nonprofits, Creative Commons and the Internet Archive, to solve the licensing and digitizing challenges involved in bringing Open Books to readers. While the books listed here use various open licenses, since 2003 we've focused on using the licenses created by Creative Commons. Donate to Creative Commons and the Internet Archive:

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