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Activities for correcting writing in the language classroom

Activities for correcting writing in the language classroom
How can teachers encourage learners to correct their own writing? Second-time winner of TeachingEnglish blog award, Cristina Cabal, offers a few tried and tested error-correction activities. Does every single writing error need to be corrected? In the learning of a second language, this is a question that stirs up great controversy. While it is true that most spelling errors will disappear as learner proficiency increases, there are some persistent errors – mainly grammatical – which remain despite repeated efforts to correct them. In the following collection of error-correction activities for writing, the main aim is to get students to identify and correct writing errors taken from their own essays. The activities are fun and highly motivating, and because they are fast-paced, I would suggest going through the errors with the whole class a second time at the end to reinforce learning. Use 'grass skirts' This activity is a lot of fun. Use sticky notes Use slips of paper Correct or incorrect?

https://www.britishcouncil.org/voices-magazine/activities-correcting-writing-language-classroom

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Christmas Stories Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays from American Literature! Enjoy Christmas with your family! Here are some favorite Christmas stories for you and your family to enjoy this holiday season. Why is English so weirdly different from other langu... English speakers know that their language is odd. So do people saddled with learning it non-natively. The oddity that we all perceive most readily is its spelling, which is indeed a nightmare. In countries where English isn’t spoken, there is no such thing as a ‘spelling bee’ competition. For a normal language, spelling at least pretends a basic correspondence to the way people pronounce the words.

Top 5 Most Frustrating Writing Mistakes (and How to Avoid Them) - Grammarly Blog Recently Grammarly asked its social media communities which writing mistakes were the worst kinds of errors. Our fans tend to find substantive grammatical trip-ups, like verb errors, far more frustrating than typographical errors and “stylistic” errors, such as homophone misspelling and preposition placement. Embed code for infographic at end of post. Here are the top five worst writing mistakes and how to avoid and correct them.

Short stories - two stars and a wish! Take a look at the film before Wednesday, please. Remember that you have to finish your first version on Wednesday. The phrases below are made by Mia Smith and her students in Gothenburg! Thanks! STARS Variation and vocabulary Your language is varied. You vary your language well. Anna's wet day out Find a picture of the hero of your story in a magazine or on the internet, big enough for your teaching situation. Procedure Stage 1: Brainstorming Holidays are coming...holidays are coming - assorted material Documentary about Bruce Mertz, a.k.a. Mr. Christmas.Questions: 1. President Obama & Marilynne Robinson: A Conversation—II by Barack Obama and Marilynne Robinson The following conversation between President Obama and Marilynne Robinson was conducted in Des Moines, Iowa, on September 14. An audio recording of the conversation can be heard at itunes.com/nybooks. The first part appeared in the November 5 issue of The New York Review.—The Editors

If I were you At school or in grammar books you are normally taught the following rule: I / he / she / it - WAS We / you / they - WERE This is correct when we are talking about the PAST TENSE. Collaborative Learning Spaces: Classrooms That Connect to the World Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Fran Siracusa, co-founder of and educational technologist for Calliope Global. As citizens of the world, students in today's classrooms seek global contexts for learning. Opportunities for networked and international collaborations are bringing both the world to classrooms and classrooms to the world. With a focus on international standards of instruction, globally-minded programs inspire students to be curious through investigation and reflective in analysis of thought. These pathways lead to the development of cultural literacy by allowing students to examine issues of global significance through interconnected sharing of experience and exchange of ideas.

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