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Helping Students Become Better Online Researchers

Helping Students Become Better Online Researchers
Your students are probably Internet authorities. When it comes to Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube, they might know far more than you. All of that time spent tweeting and chatting doesn’t necessarily translate to deep learning though. As students progress through school, online research skills become more important — for good reason. Both college professors and employers will expect young people to know their way around the academic side of the Internet; a skill that for many students, needs to be taught. In a Pew survey, a majority of teachers said that their students lacked patience and determination when doing difficult research. Image via Flickr by Brad Flickinger For many students, doing research means typing a word or two into a Google search and using information from the first link that pops up. Common Sense Media You will find lesson plans to teach strategic searches to middle school and high school students. Google Do you have a complicated relationship with Wikipedia?

http://www.edudemic.com/students-better-online-researchers/

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Online referencing generator Access to information has never been easier for students as traditional print resources are supplemented with information from a plethora of World Wide Web sources. However, the ease of information access has developed a 'cut-and-paste' mentality to research, resulting in a rise in plagiarism among the student population. In order to minimise this problem, students need to be aware of the importance of acknowledging sources and, in particular, the conventions of referencing. This in itself can be problematic as teachers and teacher librarians often struggle to offer advice on referencing the ever-growing range of information sources.

Critical Thinking: The Key to Digital Literacy – Fishtree How should we define digital literacy? Educational leader and PhD student, Lynnea West, explains her research on the principle ways of redefining education through technology, using digital literacy as a key driver: “I would hope that moving forward, we just call them ‘literacies’ and they’re just considered essential components of good literacy practices. We’re living in an online world and digital tools are our reality, so literacy in the broader context is just how we make meaning of what we’re reading or interpreting and how that joins together with our place in the world.” The concept of digital literacy has been broken down in numerous attempts to define what constitutes a ‘digital native’ and what skills are central to our understanding and interpretation of digital content.

Thing 31: Evidence Based Practice – Getting Started If school librarians can’t prove they make a difference, they may cease to exist.(Ross Todd – The Evidence-Based Manifesto for School Librarians SLJ, 2008) This first lesson in our latest Cool Tools track was inspired by conversations that started at a recent workshop by Jennifer LaGarde on annual reports and collecting data. How to Maximize the Impact of Email Newsletters With Content Curation One of the best ways to build trust with your audience is by opening a two-way communication channel. Social media has provided this for a long time now. Everyone can now tweet, message, and tag brands through channels they hang out on. When you’re on the business side of this interaction, there’s a problem (and it’s not quite obvious): these platforms dictate the rules of your engagement with the users.

ACRL Report Shows Compelling Evidence of Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success A new report issued by ACRL, “Documented Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success: Building Evidence with Team-Based Assessment in Action Campus Projects,” shows compelling evidence for library contributions to student learning and success. The report focuses on dozens of projects conducted as part of the program Assessment in Action: Academic Libraries and Student Success (AiA) by teams that participated in the second year of the program, from April 2014 to June 2015. Synthesizing more than 60 individual project reports (fully searchable online) and using past findings from projects completed during the first year of the AiA program as context, the report identifies strong evidence of the positive contributions of academic libraries to student learning and success in four key areas: Students benefit from library instruction in their initial coursework. Join a free ACRL Presents live webcast to hear more from the report authors on Monday, May 9, from 1:00 — 2:00 p.m.

ReadWorks Review for Teachers ReadWorks is a free website offering resources for differentiated reading instruction, specifically comprehension. There's a range of nonfiction texts, activities, and assessments as well as an online platform teachers can use to track student progress. After signing up as a teacher, click on Class Admin from the top menu and create a class. Teachers can add students manually or via Google Classroom by sharing a class code. Using the drop-down menus, teachers will find all that they need to get started: class demo videos, classroom protocols, tips, and suggestions that will make it easy to implement or improve reading instruction. Once classes are created, teachers can begin curating reading assignments by grade level, Lexile level, StepReads availability, and whether or not audio is included.

How libraries can guide people through the maze of information available in the digital age Erin Berman is innovations manager for the San Jose Public Library, a Prototype Fund winner in the first Knight News Challenge on Libraries. Below, she writes about opportunities worth exploring in the second Knight News Challenge on Libraries, which is now open for entries. The challenge asks, How might libraries serve 21st century information needs?

Flocabulary Review for Teachers Flocabulary is an online platform that delivers educational hip-hop songs, videos, and supplemental activities for kids in grades K-12. Flocabulary covers math, vocabulary, language arts, social studies, science, and life skills and offers a weekly news update, The Week in Rap (or The Week in Rap Junior for younger kids). Lessons contain music videos and clickable lyrics that can be played at three different speeds. Teachers in school libraries - what does the data tell us? Each year, the Wednesday of Library and Information Week is synonymous with National Simultaneous Storytime (NSS) – a time when schools, libraries and playgroups across Australia stop to share the same book at the same time. Hats off to the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) for choosing Jol and Kate Temple’s I Got This Hat, illustrated by Jon Foye for NSS 2016. It is a big week for school libraries with the announcement of the Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) Shortlist last Friday. The shortlist containing the top Australian children’s books published in the past year forms the basis of reading activities in schools leading up to Children’s Book Week in August. This year's theme of Australia!

The Every Student Succeeds Act: An ESSA Overview Published: March 31, 2016 In this video, Education Week's Alyson Klein unpacks the details of the new law and what it means for schools, educators, and students. The new Every Student Succeeds Act, signed into law Dec. 10, 2015, rolls back much of the federal government's big footprint in education policy, on everything from testing and teacher quality to low-performing schools. And it gives new leeway to states in calling the shots. That's a big change from the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), which ESSA replaced and updated. Best practices in school library website design In order to build a good, usable website for your school library, you need to think in two very different ways. First, you need to think like a librarian. What do your patrons need, and how can you best serve them? Since you all do this for a living, that should be the easy part.

Storybird Review for Teachers Storybird is an online social platform (and Chrome app) for storytelling. Students act as authors, pairing their words with site-curated, licensed art. Students can compose text, but they can't upload their own art; they must use Storybird's curated collection in their picture books and illustrated poems. After signing up or logging in with teacher-provided credentials, students can read published stories or create their own. They can repost favorite stories to their own Storybird account feeds, "heart" stories they like, and comment on them.

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