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Pearltrees Extension

Pearltrees Extension

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/pearltrees-extension/bgngjfgpahnnncnimlhjgjhdajmaeeoa

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4 Ways to Figure Out What You Should Do for Work It’s a universal dream to do what we’re passionate about. The only problem with this aspiration is that sometimes the thing we most care about isn’t what we do best. As Gloria Steinem famously said, “We teach what we need to learn, and write what we need to know.” Social Networking, Pearltrees & Curation can increase Hubpages Traffic How do the Numbers Add up Statistically here, using Pearltrees I've increased my traffic levels here, using Pearltrees significantly, in the short 5 months I've been a writer for hubpages. This form of social sharing is definitely going to change how you view the web, entirely, and this sharing actually will make hubpages much more popular, once more people catch on to the sharing on Pearltrees as well. I shared my hubs 100+ times on Pearltrees the first week, & I track the stats on both Google Analytics for Hubpages traffic, as well as on Hubpages for pearl stats. Sharing Amongst the social community of Pearltrees

Download Over 250 Free Art Books From the Getty Museum Yesterday, we wrote about the Wellcome Library’s opening up of its digital archives and making over 100,000 medical images freely available online. If you’ve already made your way through this choice selection (or if the prospect of viewing a 19th century leg amputation doesn’t quite pique your curiosity) have no fear. Getty Publications just announced the launch of its Virtual Library, where readers can freely browse and download over 250 art books from the publisher’s backlist catalogue. The Virtual Library consists of texts associated with several Getty institutions. Readers can view extensively researched exhibition catalogues from the J. Pearltrees Gets a New Look, New Features and New Premium Tiers Pearltrees, the social curation service that helps you organise Web content, photos and notes (‘pearls’) into mindmap-style ‘trees’, is today unveiling a new look, new features for paying users and revised pro account tiers. Pearltrees was launched in December 2010 and now boasts two million monthly active users, collecting over 50,000 links every day. The new UI, codenamed ‘Asimov’ by the French startup, is designed to provide a coherent, simpler experience across the Web, iOS and a forthcoming Android version. There’s nothing enormously different about it, although there’s now an Apple-style ‘dock’ at the bottom of the page for universal options and a subtly more friendly look that uses responsive design to optimize the layout for different screen sizes. The updated iOS version, which will be available as soon as it’s approved by Apple, promises to get rid of one my biggest bugbears when it comes to curation apps – the Safari bookmarklet. Now, there are three paid tiers:

Pearltrees Radically Redesigns Its Online Curation Service To Reach A Wider Audience Pearltrees, the Paris-based online curation service that launched in late 2009, was always known for its rather quirky Flash-based interface that allowed you to organize web bookmarks, photos, text snippets and documents into a mindmap-like structure. For users who got that metaphor, it was a very powerful service, but its interface also presented a barrier to entry for new users. Today, the company is launching a radical redesign that does away with most of the old baggage of Pearltrees 1.0. Gone are the Flash dependency, the tree diagrams, the little round pearls that represented your content and most everything else from the old interface. Here is what Pearltrees 1.0 looked like:

Why 'Weird Facebook' is the Next Great Internet Subculture Weird Facebook is a subculture of meme pages, secret groups, friend networks, and personalities Weird Facebook is a result of the failure of alternative Millenial institutions The scalability of Facebook allows for the creation of unprecedented “virtual realities” Weird Facebook is a mix of different social classes, motivations, aesthetics, interests, and belief systems By Rosemary Wilcox Facebook Is Uncool In a recent earnings call, Facebook CFO David Ebersman was pleased to announce that Facebook “remained close to fully penetrated among teens in the U.S.” Ebersman was replying to an investor who was concerned that Facebook was becoming “uncool” and losing traction with younger users.

Why Social Beats Search That's a controversial post headline and I don't mean that social will always beat search, but there's a rising chorus out there about "content farms" and search optimized content creation that is worth touching on. Arrington started it when he posted about "the end of hand crafted content". Richard MacManus penned a similar post the same day called "Content Farms: Why Media, Blogs, and Google should be worried". And over the weekend, Paul Kedrosky addressed the issue of search spam in his quest to find the perfect dishwasher. When a web service like Google controls a huge amount of web traffic (>50% for many sites), it's going to get spammed up. Google has thousands of employees working to combat that spam.

Free: The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Offer 474 Free Art Books Online If you like reading about visual art but don’t like spending the considerable sums required to build your own library of vintage exhibition catalogues, feel free to borrow from another collector. Or rather, feel free to borrow from two collectors, both based in New York, both of some repute: The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Early last year, we announced that the Guggenheim had made 65 art catalogues [now increased to 99] available for free online, offering “an intellectual and visual introduction to the work of Alexander Calder, Edvard Munch, Francis Bacon, Gustav Klimt & Egon Schiele, and Wassily Kandinsky” as well as ” other texts (e.g., Masterpieces of Modern Art and Abstract Expressionists Imagists) that tackle meta movements and themes.” (That same post includes instructions on how to use the Guggenheim’s archive.)

New online storytelling tools: Curating/collaborating with Pearltrees Pearltrees could be an interesting take on curated and collaborative storytelling. I discovered the site via Mo Krochmal, who hade made a paella tree using the Flash tool, and I liked the idea so much I wanted to try it out. Basically, Pearltrees allows users to collaborate on just about anything that exists online. I’ve found everything on there from beauty tips to nude photography, to political debate, all available to be updated in real time by multiple users.

Pearltrees Brings New Editing Features To Its Curation Service Pearltrees, the Paris-based curation and bookmarking service, is launching a major update to its service today that brings a number of new editing tools to the site. Pearltrees users were already able to write and save notes, as well as store images and other content on the service. Now, they will also be able to annotate the texts they saved from around the web, caption images and use the service’s new WYSIWYG text editor to write more complex notes.

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