background preloader

Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen

Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen
Ah, listening, the neglected literacy skill. I know when I was a high school English teacher this was not necessarily a primary focus; I was too busy honing the more measurable literacy skills -- reading, writing, and speaking. But when we think about career and college readiness, listening skills are just as important. This is evidenced by the listening standards found in the Common Core and also the integral role listening plays in collaboration and communication, two of the four Cs of 21st century learning. So how do we help kids become better listeners? Check out these tactics for encouraging a deeper level of listening that also include student accountability: Strategy #1: Say it Once Repeating ourselves in the classroom will produce lazy listening in our students. Of course you don't want to leave distracted students in the dust so for those few who forgot to listen, you can advise them to, "ask three, then ask me." Strategy #2: Turn and Talk Strategy #3: Student Hand Signals

http://www.edutopia.org/blog-five-listening-strategies-rebecca-alber

Related:  Ideas for teachersinspiration och tankaredutopia21st Century ClassroomFree ressources or activities

Employers Challenge to Educators: Make School Relevant to Students’ Lives Andreas Levers/Flickr Business leaders and economic thinkers are worried that today’s students aren’t leaving school with the skills they’ll need to succeed in the workplace. Representatives from tech companies and hiring experts are looking for applicants who show individuality, confidence in their abilities, ability to identify and communicate their strengths, and who are capable of thinking on their feet. At the recent Next New World conference hosted by New York Times columnist Tom Friedman, panelists addressed the question of how the American education system can better prepare students to meet the evolving challenges of the 21st century economy.

5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting Classroom discussions have been a staple of teaching forever, beginning with Socrates. I have taught using discussions, been a student in discussions, and observed other teachers' discussions thousands of times -- at least. Some have been boring, stifling or tedious enough to put me to sleep. Others have been so stimulating that I was sad to see them end.

Curiosity killed by class? When you become a father you get used to being asked endless questions about the intricacies of our complex world. The road is paved with unending questions. Why does this…? How does that…? The Case for Cultivating Cultural Awareness Sometimes students, parents, teachers, and administrators are comfortable living in the shells of their own existence. They’re satisfied with the status quo, choose to interact with those from the same religious backgrounds, cultural heritage, and political affiliations. They prefer their days to be filled with very little questioning, or feather-ruffling, or challenging. Sometimes they consider the alternative views of others to be wrong, not just different. From an educational perspective, this is downright dangerous. We now have an enormous responsibility to ensure that our students develop cultural awareness and are engaged in acts of citizenship, not only within our schools and surrounding areas, but as active members of the global community.

Experts Reveal Favorite Methods for Learning Vocabulary Learning more words: experts share their favorite strategy. Aaahhhh, learning vocabulary! It must be the sexiest element of learning a language. And perhaps the most controversial. It’s not for nothing that polyglots call it the Kim Kardashian of the language-learning community. (Actually, I made that up. ;-)) 10 Engaging Games for Summer Learning For this week's Top Picks List Friday, we're featuring games for summer learning. Anything remotely school related is a total summer-break bummer. But that doesn't mean the learning has to stop. Kids are sure to become engrossed in these great at-home games that are also teacher approved.

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. Um, I don't think she thought it was so cute. I think she was treading lightly on the ever-so shaky ego of a brand-new teacher while still giving me some very necessary feedback. Time Management: Planning for the Adventure Image credit: iStockphoto As we leave summer and approach back to school in a frenzy, the "To Do" list can become overwhelming. As teachers, we find ourselves pulled in different directions -- setting up our classrooms, learning student profiles, meeting with parents, lesson planning, collaborating with administrators -- the list seems eternal! There is one important element that we sometimes forget: focus.

Free Online Resources Engage Elementary Kids (Tech2Learn Series) Teacher: As a K-5 teacher, we understand that it's really important to integrate the curriculum as much as possible. So if you're doing a lesson in the computer lab, if it's combining some of the reading skills, writing skills, language art skills, or their knowledge about a certain subject area, I think that it makes learning a lot more meaningful. Teacher: A few years ago, the District had to do a lot of cutbacks on tech spending. And I started to see that there was an advantage of using the cloud-based, or free web apps. The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom I have many “Best” lists related to using online games with English Language Learners, and you can find them all at A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Learning Games. I’ve also written a lot and published a number of posts and resources related to playing non-online games in the classroom, but just realized I had never brought them all together in one place. Here they are (feel free to offer more suggestions!): Here are two excerpts from our book on teaching ELLs:

8 Lessons For Teacher Growth 8 Lessons For Teacher Growth by Terry Heick 1. Humility You’re probably very good at what you do–at least parts of it. Rethinking Whole Class Discussion Whole class discussions are, after lecture, the second most frequently used teaching strategy, one mandated by the Common Core State Standards because of its many rewards: increased perspective-taking, understanding, empathy, and higher-order thinking, among others. These benefits, however, do not manifest without a skillful and knowledgeable facilitator. Unfortunately, a preponderance of evidence demonstrates that many teachers mistakenly conflate discussion with recitation. "Typical teacher-student discourse resembles a quiz show, with teachers asking a question, the student replying, and the teacher evaluating the student's response. This is called initiation-response-evaluation, 'I-R-E,' or recitation."1 In contrast to recitation, quality discussion, according to the University of Washington's Center for Instructional Development and Research, involves purposeful questions prepared in advance, assessment, and starting points for further conversations.

Addressing Our Needs: Maslow Comes to Life for Educators and Students In the mid-1950s, humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow created a theory of basic, psychological and self-fulfillment needs that motivate individuals to move consciously or subconsciously through levels or tiers based on our inner and outer satisfaction of those met or unmet needs. As a parent and educator, I find this theory eternally relevant for students and adults, especially in our classrooms. After studying it over the past couple of years, my graduate and undergraduate students have decided that every classroom should display a wall-sized diagram of the pyramid, as students and teachers alike place pins and post-its on the varying tiers based on their own feelings, behaviors and needs. What do actual brain-compatible strategies look like on this pyramid? Tier One

Related: