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The omnivore's next dilemma: Michael Pollan on TED What if human consciousness isn’t the end-all and be-all of Darwinism? What if we are all just pawns in corn’s clever strategy game, the ultimate prize of which is world domination? Michael Pollan asks us to see things from a plant’s-eye view — to consider the possibility that nature isn’t opposed to culture, that biochemistry rivals intellect as a survival tool. By merely shifting our perspective, he argues, we can heal the Earth. Who’s the more sophisticated species now? How To: Plant Seeds Using Eggshells We were excited when our Sprout Robot alert went off that it was time to start broccoli seeds indoors this weekend for our zip code. With the move and being in the midst of colder months, we are seriously lacking in the gardening department, except for our avocado sprouts (which we have an exciting update on coming tomorrow). We located our organic broccoli seed packet from last year's garden and hit up our gardening Pinterest boards (mine & hers) where we've been collecting ideas for creative planting all winter.

Companion Planting Companion planting is little more than a general notion that certain plants can benefit others when planted in near proximity. It is literally defined as the establishment of two or more plant species in close proximity so that some cultural benefit (pest control, higher yield, etc.) is derived. Scientifically speaking, companion planting embraces a number of strategies that increase the biodiversity of agricultural ecosystems (or what I typically call a garden). In layman’s terms, though, it is just about two plants helping each other out somehow. While companion planting has a long history, the mechanisms of beneficial plant interaction have not always been well understood. In most cases they are formed out of oral tradition, family secrets, and front porch recommendations.

Gladiolus: How to Plant, Grow, and Care for Gladiolus Botanical name: Gladiolus Plant type: Flower USDA Hardiness Zones: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 Sun exposure: Full Sun Plants for Pathways - Fine Gardening Article - StumbleUpon These are the most forgiving Woolly thyme likes to stretch its flat branches out over sidewalks and stairs. It is useful in softening the lines described by hardscaping materials like brick and concrete. Ornamental thymes (Thymus spp. and cvs.) are probably one of the most forgiving groups of plants when it comes to foot traffic.

NPIN: Native Plant Database Welcome to the latest edition of the Native Plants Database where you can explore the wealth of native plants in North America. Use the options below to search for 7,927 native plants by scientific or common name or choose a particular family of plants. For non-native or introduced species, please visit the USDA Plants Database. Recommended Species lists 16 Foods That’ll Re-Grow from Kitchen Scraps By Andy Whiteley Co- Founder of Wake Up World Looking for a healthy way to get more from your garden? Like to know your food is free of the pesticides and other nasties that are often sprayed on commercial crops?

Vertical Gardens comments on 04/22 at 01:35 AM Oh wow, I like this too. 17 Apart: Growing Celery Indoors: Never Buy Celery Again Remember when we tested and shared how to grow onions indefinitely last week? Well, at the same time, we've been testing out another little indoor gardening project first gleaned from Pinterest that we're excited to share the successes of today — regrowing celery from it's base. We've figured out how to literally re-grow organic celery from the base of the bunch we bought from the store a couple weeks ago. I swear, we must have been living under a rock all these years or just not be that resourceful when it comes to food, but we're having more fun learning all these new little tips and tricks as we dive deeper into trying to grow more of our own food.

Build a Garden in One Day - How to Get Started One benefit of a raised bed is that you don't need to dig out all the grass. But you do need to keep grass at bay so it doesn't invade your new garden. So cover the ground with a biodegradable landscape fabric, sometimes called biodegradable weed fabric or organic weed control. Leafsnap, a new mobile app that identifies plants by leaf shape, is launched by Smithsonian and collaborators  The Smithsonian Institution, Columbia University and the University of Maryland have pooled their expertise to create the world’s first plant identification mobile app using visual search—Leafsnap. This electronic field guide allows users to identify tree species simply by taking a photograph of the tree’s leaves. In addition to the species name, Leafsnap provides high-resolution photographs and information about the tree’s flowers, fruit, seeds and bark—giving the user a comprehensive understanding of the species.

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