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Word Order / Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson (Part 1)

Word Order / Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson (Part 1)
Related:  Sentence Structure: Word Order in English.Grammar box

SVOMPT - Word Order in English The SVOMPT rule is the most important rule in English. As there are very few declinations in English, the word order rule is the one that keeps the sentences understandable. If you do not apply this rule, your sentences will make no sense. Unfortunately, there are very few textbook that teach this grammar explicitly. To make your work easier, you will find an infographic and a worksheet which you can use in your lessons here. To explain the basic rule you can use the following infographic which I published several years ago. This time I try to make things a bit easier and I created the following infographic. When explaining the rule, emphasize that you cannot leave out the subject. Students have to remember that each sentence has to contain the SUBJECT and VERB. To practise the grammar, here is a worksheet with three exercises. In the first exercise, students circle the sentences that are correct. In the second exercise, students place the word in brackets into the correct position.

What are Adverb Particles? Words like in, out, up, down etc., are not always prepositions. Read the sentences given below. He was driving down the street. Please sit down. He climbed up the stairs. He is in the room. In the expressions ‘down the street’, ‘up the stairs’ and ‘in the room’, the words down, up and in are prepositions. In the expressions ‘sit down’, ‘she is not up’ and ‘come in’, the words down, up and in have no objects. Small adverbs like these are often called adverb particles or adverbial particles. Note that many words of this kind can be used as both adverb particles and prepositions. Phrasal verbs Adverb particles are sometimes used together with verbs to form two-word verbs. Could you please switch on the lights? Note that the meaning of a phrasal verb is not always guessable from the meanings of the individual words in it.

Learn to use the conjunctions DESPITE, IN SPITE OF and ALTHOUGH In this post I would like to teach you how to use the words DESPITE, IN SPITE OF, ALTHOUGH, EVEN THOUGH, BECAUSE OF and BECAUSE correctly. I will explain the meaning of the words and the grammar. To help you with this there are two games, a mind map, a video explanation and a graphical explanation. I hope you will learn to use these conjunctions. The meaning of the conjunctions DESPITE and IN SPITE OF is the same. If you want to print out the graphic, you can download the pdf file below: The meaning As I write above, the main difference between the phrases is their usage. To make it absolutely clear, here is an interactive video explaining the usage of the words BECAUSE and BECAUSE OF. Conjunctions – quizzes and games The first game is slightly easier but it can be played only on your desktop. The second quiz is fully in HTML5 so it will play on any mobile device you own. Conjunctions – quiz and Math pop game

Sentence Structure: Learn about the four types of sentences! Are You Ready To Learn About Sentence Structure? Thank goodness for sentences and sentence structure. Sentences are nice little packages of words that come together to express complete thoughts. Without sentences, we'd probably all be walking around like a bunch of babbling idiots. :) On this page, you're going to learn about simple sentences, compound sentences, complex sentences, and compound-complex sentences. I'm also going to show you how to diagram those things because sentence diagramming is super-duper helpful when it comes to SEEING a sentence's structure. Quick Refresher In order to be a complete sentence, a group of words needs to contain a subject and a verb, and it needs to express a complete thought. If a group of words is missing any of that information, it's probably a sentence fragment. If you have a group of words containing two or more independent clauses that are not properly punctuated, it's probably a run-on sentence. The Four Sentence Structures I kicked the ball. Psst!

Word Family Framework Word Family Framework Submitted by admin on 19 July, 2012 - 11:52 The Word Family Framework (WFF) places 22,000 words on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). It shows how words within the same family are placed at different levels and is aimed at teachers who can use it to plan courses, syllabi and lessons. What is the Word Family Framework (WFF)? The WFF is a searchable resource for teachers and learners of English that consists of over 22,000 vocabulary items arranged according to six levels aligned to the Common European Framework of Reference. What can the WFF be used for? The WFF can be used by institutions, teachers and learners to construct target vocabularies for individual learning, syllabus and lesson planning, materials design and exam preparation. ‘Vertical searches’ ? ? ‘Horizontal searches’ ? ? ? How can the WFF be searched? The WFF can be searched in three main ways: 1. 2. 3. How does the WFF link to the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR)? ?

Flashcards about Irregular Eng Verbs incorrect cards (0) correct cards (0) remaining cards (156) Save retry fix restart shuffle help To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key. retry the cards in the incorrect box restart all cards Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page. English Sentence Structure: Simple, Compound, Complex, and Compound-Complex Sentences | Linguistics Girl Sentence structure refers to the structure of sentences in a language. Four types of sentence structures exist in the English language: simple sentences, compound sentences, complex sentences, and compound-complex sentences. Simple Sentences The first type of sentence in the English language is the simple sentence. Subject | PredicateShe | laughed.The fire alarm | sounded loudly.A strange girl | visits the library with her father.Forty-two thousand muskrats and one lone ox | have plotted to destroy the city. Compound Sentences The second type of sentence in the English language is the compound sentence. Complex Sentences The third type of sentence in the English language is the complex sentence. Compound-Complex Sentences The fourth type of sentence in the English language is the compound-complex sentence. Noun Clauses and Adjective Clauses Different grammars analyze sentences containing noun clauses and adjective, or relative, clauses differently. References Brinton, Laurel J. & Donna M.

British Council - Word Family Framework About What is the Word Family Framework (WFF)? The WFF is a searchable resource for teachers and learners of English that consists of over 22,000 vocabulary items arranged according to six levels aligned to the Common European Framework of Reference. What can the WFF be used for? 'Vertical searches' identifying all the vocabulary items at one CEFR level identifying all the items at several CEFR levels 'Horizontal searches' identifying the CEFR level of an individual word or group of words identifying the CEFR levels of all the members of a word family in order to decide which items may be worth learning identifying unknown members of word families in order to extend a learner's vocabulary How can the WFF be searched? 1 For horizontal searches to look for a particular word or item, type the term you are looking for in the search box: Then click the Start box: 2 For vertical searches to find all the items at one or more CEFR levels, tick ( ) all the CEFR levels you want: How large is the WFF? 1.

10 Fun ESL Activities to Practice Modal Auxiliary Verbs Modal: Can/To Be Able To Giraffes can’t dance. Usage: Ability 1. 2. Modal: Might/May/Could Jamie might come to the party. Usage: Possibility 3. 4.

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