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How language changes over time

How language changes over time
Now playing In this fun, short talk from TEDYouth, lexicographer Erin McKean encourages — nay, cheerleads — her audience to create new words when the existing ones won’t quite do. She lists out 6 ways to make new words in English, from compounding to “verbing,” in order to make language better at expressing what we mean, and to create more ways for us to understand one another.

http://www.ted.com/playlists/228/how_language_changes_over_time

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Activities for correcting writing in the language classroom How can teachers encourage learners to correct their own writing? Second-time winner of TeachingEnglish blog award, Cristina Cabal, offers a few tried and tested error-correction activities. Does every single writing error need to be corrected? In the learning of a second language, this is a question that stirs up great controversy.

Gaza and the language of modern war The propaganda battle in a modern war begins with its name. Israel's attack on Gaza this summer was given an official Hebrew name meaning "resolute cliff", so as to assure its victims of the futility of resistance. Only a fool would try to fight a cliff, even an irresolute one. BusyTeacher.org Students love being able to understand and read current news in English and there is something to interest everyone in a newspaper. The average reading age for most newspapers is approximately 11-13 years old, just perfect for those learning English as a foreign language. Newspapers are also a handy resource for English language teachers.

Why is English so weirdly different from other langu... English speakers know that their language is odd. So do people saddled with learning it non-natively. The oddity that we all perceive most readily is its spelling, which is indeed a nightmare. In countries where English isn’t spoken, there is no such thing as a ‘spelling bee’ competition. How Many of Your Memories Are Fake? One afternoon in February 2011, seven researchers at the University of California, Irvine sat around a long table facing Frank Healy, a bright-eyed 50-year-old visitor from South Jersey, taking turns quizzing him on his extraordinary memory. Observing from outside of the circle, I tape-recorded the conversation as one researcher tossed out a date at random: December 17, 1999. “Okay,” Healy replied, “Well, December 17, 1999, the jazz great, Grover Washington Jr., died while playing in a concert.” “What did you eat that morning for breakfast?” “Special K for breakfast.

Speaking Activities On these pages you will find ideas for classsroom activities which involve speaking. (These tips are taken on this site · Find the murderer · Bingo mingle · Short projects to get them talking - Lists · Superlative questions » Teaching English through songs in the digital age – #ELTchat summary 12/01/... This absolutely fantastic summary was contributed by Vicky Saumell on her blog in 4 consective posts which I have merged into one single post. As Viky herself remarks below in her post, it is an amazing collection of resources all shared by you, #ELTchatters! What a fantastic resource this has turned into! And thanks to Vicky for an outstanding job!!! 1. The full transcript of Michelle Obama's powerful New Hampshire speech My goodness! You guys are fired up! Well, let me just say hello everyone.

Steve Ramirez and Xu Liu: A mouse. A laser beam. A manipulated memory. Close Help with subtitles Desktop / laptop users: please make sure you have the most updated versions of your browser and Flash player, and that Flash is enabled when you visit TED.com. How to Engage Students in the First few Minutes I have a wonderful friend who is currently a student teacher. I absolutely love chatting to her about her experiences and questions, as she challenges me to reflect on my own practice: to re-evaluate my strategies; to work out what it is I do and why; to tweak what isn’t working. Her questions are always intelligent, thought-provoking and full of exciting curiosity – she is going to make an exceptional teacher. A few weeks ago she asked me how to get students to ‘come to the party’; how to entice them to engage and participate in the learning experience so that it wasn’t a one-sided affair.

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