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What's the most effective way to take notes?

What's the most effective way to take notes?
If it feels like you forget new information almost as quickly as you hear it, even if you write it down, that’s because we tend to lose almost 40% of new information within the first 24 hours of first reading or hearing it. If we take notes effectively, however, we can retain and retrieve almost 100% of the information we receive. Learning how to retain information The most effective note-taking skills involve active rather than passive learning. Active learning places the responsibility for learning on the learner. Research has found that, for learning to be effective, students need to be doing things with the material they are engaging with (reading, writing, discussing, solving problems). They must also be thinking about the thinking (metacognition) involved in engaging with the material. Studies have found note taking is most effective when notes are organised and transformed in some way or when a teacher gives examples of good notes. What are the most effective ways to take notes?

http://theconversation.com/whats-the-best-most-effective-way-to-take-notes-41961

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