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25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy

25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy
25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom’s Taxonomy While critical thinking is a foundation rather than a brick, how you build that foundation depends on the learning process itself: exposing students to new thinking and promoting interaction with that thinking in a gradual release of responsibility approach. Question stems can be a powerful part of that process no matter where the learner is. Assessment (pre-assessment, self-assessment, formative and summative assessment), prompting and cueing during discussion, etc. In that light, the following 25+ question stems framed around the early, non-revised Bloom’s Taxonomy are worth a gander. Image attribution flickr enokson; 25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom’s Taxonomy

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/25-question-stems-framed-around-blooms-taxonomy/

5 Good Ideas for High Schools to Adapt from Elementary Schools Always on the lookout for ways to help high schools run more smoothly and effectively, I keep noticing that many good ideas for improving high school programs and policies look a lot like the way elementary schools operate. I wonder if some of these ideas from K-5 schools could be adapted for high schools. For example … 1. Focus on literacy. Literacy is the primary focus in most elementary classrooms. Handwriting in the Time of Common Core My father, who had no more than an eighth grade education, wrote in a beautiful Palmer hand. His oneroom schoolhouse education did not promise to take him far, but it did allow him to place words on paper in an elegant and readable manner. And, this skill had practical utility beyond its aesthetic beauty, since he worked for many years as a bookkeeper.

249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking Bloom’s Taxonomy’s verbs–also know as power verbs or thinking verbs–are extraordinarily powerful instructional planning tools. In fact, next to the concept of backwards-design and power standards, they are likely the most useful tool a teacher-as-learning-designer has access to. Why? They can be used for curriculum mapping, assessment design, lesson planning, personalizing and differentiating learning, and almost any other “thing” a teacher–or student–has to do. For example, if a standard asks students to infer and demonstrate an author’s position using evidence from the text, there’s a lot built into that kind of task. First a student has to be able to define what an “author’s position” is and what “evidence from the text” means (Knowledge-level).

Learning in a networked world What does learning look like in a world that is increasingly networked? How can we harness the ever-increasing range of online technologies to support effective learning? What are the implications for teachers, for students, and for the wider community? And what are the implications for distance education providers as the boundaries blur between them and traditional face-to-face providers? These are some of the questions I explored in my keynote to the AADES conference in Melbourne last week, in which I explored current trends in education and how these are re-shaping how we think about schooling, teaching and the role of learners. My focus was on how we might respond these questions in order to meet the challenges of learning in a networked world – particularly as traditional providers of distance education in the schooling sector.

Vocabulary Development During Read-Alouds: Primary Practices Reading storybooks aloud to children is recommended by professional organizations as a vehicle for building oral language and early literacy skills (International Reading Association & National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1998). Reading aloud is widely accepted as a means of developing vocabulary (Newton, Padak, & Rasinski, 2008), particularly in young children (Biemiller & Boote, 2006). Wide reading is a powerful vehicle for vocabulary acquisition for older and more proficient readers (Stanovich, 1986), but since beginning readers are limited in their independent reading to simple decodable or familiar texts, exposure to novel vocabulary is unlikely to come from this source (Beck & McKeown, 2007). Read-alouds fill the gap by exposing children to book language, which is rich in unusual words and descriptive language. Much is known about how children acquire new vocabulary and the conditions that facilitate vocabulary growth. Adult mediation in read-alouds

Four Essential Principles of Blended Learning As schools become more savvy about blended-learning tactics– the practice of mixing online and in-person instruction — guidelines and best practices are emerging from lessons learned. Here are four crucial factors to keep in mind as schools plunge in. The single biggest piece of advice offered by most blended learning pioneers is to have a cohesive vision for how the technology will enhance specific learning goals, how it will ease the burden on teachers, and how it can make both teachers and students more creative learners.

Common Core in Action: Using Digital Storytelling Tools in the ELA Classroom When students come to school each morning, they have tons of stories -- stories to share with their friends as they unpack or move through the hallways, stories to share with the class during morning meetings, or stories to share with a teacher about something that made them happy or sad. In the classroom, writing can happen in many different ways, whether it's free writing in a notebook to gather ideas or publishing stories to share with the whole school. The Common Core State Standards expect that children across the grades can write for three specific purposes:

Agnotology Agnotology (formerly agnatology) is the study of culturally induced ignorance or doubt, particularly the publication of inaccurate or misleading scientific data. In 1995 Robert N. Proctor, a Stanford University professor specializing in the history of science and technology,[1] and linguist Iain Boal coined the neologism[2][3][4] on the basis of the Neoclassical Greek word ἄγνωσις, agnōsis, "not knowing" (cf. Attic Greek ἄγνωτος "unknown"[5]), and -λογία, -logia.[6] More generally, the term also highlights the increasingly common condition where more knowledge of a subject leaves one more uncertain than before. 13 Strategies to Improve Student Classroom Discussions Questions inspire! When educators pose thought-provoking questions to their students, they send a powerful message that students’ ideas about what they read are valuable. Great Books' professional learning courses, webinars and consultation days help educators gain new instructional strategies, pose higher-order and text-dependent questions, and encourage classroom discussion. Asking the right questions at the right time is a skill best cultivated over time.

Education Update:Planning for Processing Time Yields Deeper Learning:Guidelines for Creating Rubrics August 2013 | Volume 55 | Number 8 Planning for Processing Time Yields Deeper Learning Pages 2-2 Bryan Goodwin and Elizabeth Ross Hubbell's new book The 12 Touchstones of Good Teaching: A Checklist for Staying Focused Every Day includes a chapter on how to clarify performance expectations for students. Rubrics are an essential tool for delineating the criteria that distinguishes between novice and mastery-level work. Here are a few brief guidelines Goodwin and Hubbell recommend for creating rubrics, as well as a list of online tools to support your work: Identify the proficient level first.

Give Kids Their Reading Choice "There are no reluctant readers," proclaims Lisa Von Drasek, the effervescent children's librarian at Bank Street College of Education in New York, "just kids who haven't found their choice yet." Plug into her way of thinking, and you'll see your child's relationship to reading in a whole new light. She suggests these strategies for your not-yet-passionate reader: Don't pressure him to read a certain something. Using Webb's Depth of Knowledge to Increase Rigor The word "rigor" is hard to avoid today, and it provokes strong reactions from educators. Policymakers tout its importance. Publishers promote it as a feature of their materials.

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