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What motivates us at work? 7 fascinating studies that give insights

What motivates us at work? 7 fascinating studies that give insights
“When we think about how people work, the naïve intuition we have is that people are like rats in a maze,” says behavioral economist Dan Ariely in today’s talk, given at TEDxRiodelaPlata. “We really have this incredibly simplistic view of why people work and what the labor market looks like.” Dan Ariely: What makes us feel good about our work?When you look carefully at the way people work, he says, you find out there’s a lot more at play—and a lot more at stake—than money. In his talk, Ariely provides evidence that we are also driven by meaningful work, by others’ acknowledgement and by the amount of effort we’ve put in: the harder the task is, the prouder we are. During the Industrial Revolution, Ariely points out, Adam Smith’s efficiency-oriented, assembly-line approach made sense. To hear more on Ariely’s thoughts about what makes people more productive – and happier – at work, watch this fascinating talk. What have you noticed makes you work harder – and better?

http://blog.ted.com/2013/04/10/what-motivates-us-at-work-7-fascinating-studies-that-give-insights/

Related:  Meaning and HappinessBehavioral Economics"self-help"Engaging & Motivating Others

You too can be happy. Really. A Q&A with Shawn Achor Photo courtesy TEDxBloomington. “We think we have to be successful, then we’ll be happier. But the real problem is our brains work in the opposite order,” said Shawn Achor in his charming, immensely popular TED Talk from TEDxBloomington, “The happy secret to better work.” Achor is the CEO of consulting firm Good Think, which conducts research on positive psychology and helps people apply it to be happier and more effective at work. His 2011 talk drew on the research from his bestselling book on positive psychology, The Happiness Advantage, and since then he’s had a new question on his mind: Why are some people able to make positive changes in their lives, while others remain stuck in their ways? Survival of the ... Nicest? Check Out the Other Theory of Evolution by Eric Michael Johnson A new theory of human origins says cooperation—not competition—is instinctive. posted May 03, 2013 A century ago, industrialists like Andrew Carnegie believed that Darwin’s theories justified an economy of vicious competition and inequality. They left us with an ideological legacy that says the corporate economy, in which wealth concentrates in the hands of a few, produces the best for humanity.

9 Free Online Courses You Should Take by Johnny Webber 1. How to Reasons and Argue – Reasoning is important. This course will teach you how to do it well. Viktor Frankl on the Human Search for Meaning by Maria Popova “Live as if you were living already for the second time and as if you had acted the first time as wrongly as you are about to act now!” Celebrated Austrian psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl, born on March 26, 1905, remains best-known for his indispensable 1946 psychological memoir Man’s Search for Meaning (public library) — a meditation on what the gruesome experience of Auschwitz taught him about the primary purpose of life: the quest for meaning, which sustained those who survived.

theconversation Australian government policy and happiness research are pointing in very different directions. A prime goal of government policy is economic growth. Many Australians go along with this, assuming that more money will make them happier. In rich and poor nations, giving makes people feel better than getting, research finds Feeling good about spending money on someone else rather than for personal benefit may be a universal response among people in both impoverished countries and rich nations, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. "Our findings suggest that the psychological reward experienced from helping others may be deeply ingrained in human nature, emerging in diverse cultural and economic contexts," said lead author Lara Aknin, PhD, of Simon Fraser University in Canada. The findings provide the first empirical evidence that "the warm glow" of spending on someone else rather than on oneself may be a widespread component of human psychology, the authors reported in the study published online in APA's Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Researchers found a positive relationship between personal well-being and spending on others in 120 of 136 countries covered in the 2006-2008 Gallup World Poll.

50 Things You Should Stop Buying & Start Making As a society, we have become over-reliant on “ready made” products. We have lost the ability to make things from scratch. Rather than blend up some peanuts to make delicious, tasty and fresh peanut butter, we’ll spend many dollars on a jar from the store that contains artificial preservatives, unnecessary packaging and that simply lines the pockets of huge, unethical multinational corporations. Aside from foods, you can also make your own personal care products, beauty and make up products, cleaning products and home accessories that taste, work or look better than store bought, without the harmful chemicals and toxins and free from excessive, earth damaging packaging.

How to keep employees motivated Let’s face it, not everyone in an organization is on their way up the ladder. With few top jobs in every rung and with many people vying for a promotion, organizations face the ultimate challenge of keeping employees motivated when there are no promotions to give. Researchers Jin Li and Michael Powell, both of whom are assistant professors of strategy at Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, in their article in Kellogg Insight, speak about how companies can make sure their workers are motivated even when there are not plentiful promotions to hand out.

Does having choice make us happy? 6 studies that suggest it doesn’t always We have all been there: standing in aisle five of the supermarket trying to decide which jar of mustard to buy. Do we go organic, or for the brand with whole mustard seeds? Or do we simply pick the one in the brightest yellow bottle? In a fascinating talk at TEDxStanford, “Sometimes it’s good to give up the driver’s seat,” marketing professor Baba Shiv reveals that discomfort over making choices extends into medical decisions. Five years ago, Shiv’s wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. Daniel Kahneman on Making Smarter Decisions The bestselling author of Thinking, Fast and Slow talks about overcoming the cognitive biases and errors that can affect decision-making. You can avoid decision-making mistakes by understanding the differences between these two systems of thought. Nobel winner Daniel Kahneman says we tyically fear loss twice as much as we relish success.

10 Drills To Make You A Skilled Concealed Carrier You’ve chosen to carry a weapon concealed for your personal protection and that of your family. But you’ve eschewed specialized training and chosen instead to rely upon your personal knowledge, the stuff you have read in written self-defense and firearm publications, and the common sense that has gotten you to this point in the first place. After all, mama didn’t raise a fool. You’ve been pretty successful at staying alive to this point, so the following is intended as a basic guideline to enhance your current set of skills. The following is what I call the 30-round defensive shooting scenario. How To Develop a Long-Term Employee Engagement Solution Increasing employee engagement is a priority for most companies. That’s because having a workforce devoid of enthusiasm can come at a steep price: Lost productivity, absenteeism, workplace accidents, increased health care costs, and high turnover. But as most HR professionals know, it’s difficult to motivate employees. Aligning business strategy with motivators Rewards-punishment systems are popular, but they aren’t the best motivators once an employee’s basic needs are covered.

A Short Guide to a Happy Life: Anna Quindlen on Work, Joy, and How to Live Rather Than Exist by Maria Popova “You cannot be really first-rate at your work if your work is all you are.” The commencement address is a special kind of modern communication art, and its greatest masterpieces tend to either become a book — take, for instance, David Foster Wallace on the meaning of life, Neil Gaiman on the resilience of the creative spirit, Ann Patchett on storytelling and belonging, and Joseph Brodsky on winning the game of life — or have originated from a book, such as Debbie Millman on courage and the creative life. One of the greatest commencement speeches of all time, however, has an unusual story that flies in the face of both traditional trajectories. In 2000, Villanova University invited Pulitzer-Prize-winning author, journalist, and New York Times op-ed columnist Anna Quindlen to deliver the annual commencement address.

How Money Worries Can Scramble Your Thinking : Shots - Health News hide captionWorrying about finances can tax the brain just as much as staying up all night. Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR Worrying about finances can tax the brain just as much as staying up all night. There's no question that dealing with mortgages, car payments and other bills takes up time and energy. But having a tight budget may also zap our ability to think clearly, scientists report Thursday in the journal Science.

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