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Manifesto for Agile Software Development

Manifesto for Agile Software Development
We are uncovering better ways of developingsoftware by doing it and helping others do it.Through this work we have come to value: Individuals and interactions over processes and toolsWorking software over comprehensive documentationCustomer collaboration over contract negotiationResponding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items onthe right, we value the items on the left more. © 2001, the above authorsthis declaration may be freely copied in any form, but only in its entirety through this notice. Twelve Principles of Agile Software Become a SignatoryView Signatories

http://agilemanifesto.org/

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The Burn-Down Chart: An Effective Planning and Tracking Tool Burn-downs charts are among the most common sprint tracking mechanisms used by Agile practitioners. Though their application and usage varies (some plot a burn-down chart using story points, whereas others use task count), plotting burn-down using effort remaining is the most effective and efficient way of using burn-down charts. This article looks at creating and updating a burn-down chart using the effort-remaining approach, interpreting burn-down under different scenarios, and examining common mistakes to avoid while using burn-downs. We conclude by looking at some of the benefits of using this innovative tool. How to create a burn-down chart Scrum Guides This HTML version of the Scrum Guide is a direct port of the July 2013 version available as a PDF here. Purpose of the Scrum Guide Scrum is a framework for developing and sustaining complex products. This Guide contains the definition of Scrum. This definition consists of Scrum’s roles, events, artifacts, and the rules that bind them together. Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland developed Scrum; the Scrum Guide is written and provided by them.

FBI Sentinel Project Executive Summary: Virtual Case File (or VCF) was a software application developed by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation(FBI) between 2000 and 2005. The project was not close to completion when it was officially abandoned in January 2005, having turned into a complete fiasco for the FBI. In addition to wasting at least US $100 million, the failure brought widespread criticism to the bureau and its director, Robert S. Michael Wesch Michael Lee Wesch (born June 22, 1975) is associate professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University. Wesch's work also includes media ecology and the emerging field of digital ethnography, where he studies the effect of new media on human interaction. Wesch is a cultural anthropologist and media ecologist exploring the effects of new media on human interaction. He graduated summa cum laude from the Kansas State University Anthropology Program in 1997 and returned as a faculty member in 2004 after receiving his PhD in Anthropology at the University of Virginia.[1] There he pursued research on social and cultural change in Melanesia, focusing on the introduction of print and print-based practices like mapping and census-taking in the remote Mountain Ok region of Papua New Guinea where he lived for a total of 18 months from 1999-2003. This work inspired Wesch to examine the effects of new media more broadly, especially digital media.

What President Eisenhower Can Teach us About Prioritization President Dwight D. Eisenhower stayed extremely busy as the 34th U.S. President, both commanding the Allied Forces during WWII and managing his duties as a decorated five-star general. It takes impressive organizational skills to succeed at just one of these positions, not to mention all three. Wondering how he did it? Principles behind the Agile Manifesto We follow these principles: Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.

Agile software development Agile software development is a set of principles for software development in which requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing,[1] cross-functional teams. It promotes adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, and continuous improvement, and it encourages rapid and flexible response to change.[2] Agile itself has never defined any specific methods to achieve this, but many have grown up as a result and have been recognized as being 'Agile'. The Manifesto for Agile Software Development,[3] also known as the Agile Manifesto, was first proclaimed in 2001, after "agile methodology" was originally introduced in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

FBI's Sentinel Project: 5 Lessons Learned Agency used agile development and private sector know-how to finish its long-delayed digital case management system. American Red Cross Social Media Command Center (click image for larger view and for slideshow) After six years of development, the FBI says its next-gen digital case management system, Sentinel, is finally up and running. FBI agents can now use the system to manage records electronically, with document templates, drop-down menus, and many other PC-like features.

Jonathan Gay Jonathan Gay is an American computer programmer and software entrepreneur based in Northern California. Gay was a co-founder of FutureWave Software in 1993. For a decade, he was the main programmer and visionary of Flash, an animation editor for web pages. He founded Software as Art, which was later renamed Greenbox, which made energy management solutions for the home. 9 agile development tools for working at warp speed Dapulse’s project management tool enables teams to track the status of their high-level goals while offering fine-grained management capabilities that makes project collaboration faster. While Dapulse can be used in software development, Australia-based Rescon Builders uses it to manage construction projects. “We use Dapulse as a task management, project planning, and company portal,” Rescon’s Timothy Cocaro says. “Having different boards, we can easily create tasks that are department-specific, e.g., ‘administration,’ ‘construction,’ etc.” Rescon has been using Dapulse for the past two years to track the overall status of projects and approvals for its granny flat construction projects. “Given the application is so visual and easy to understand, it acts as our company portal.

About Self Organizing Teams/ Posted 4/11/2016 12:05:46 PM by CLEMENTINO DE MENDONCA, Professional Scrum Trainer with Scrum.org A question from a budding Scrum Master, who is transitioning from a background as a traditional project manager: “In order to promote team bonding and self-organization, from now on I am going to try something new with the team. In the sprint planning meeting, instead of me breaking down the tasks for user stories between each team member, I am going to just identify tasks and hours needed and leave it at that, and then I will ask each team member to “pick” tasks from the sprint backlog on their own, and later, as soon as they complete a previously picked task.” Agile Is Dead (Long Live Agility) - PragDave Thirteen years ago, I was among seventeen middle-aged white guys who gathered at Snowbird, Utah. We were there because we shared common beliefs about developing software, and we wondered if there was a way to describe what we believed. It took less than a day to come up with a short list of values. We published those values, along with a list of practices, as the Manifesto for Agile Software Development: Individuals and Interactions over Processes and ToolsWorking Software over Comprehensive DocumentationCustomer Collaboration over Contract Negotiation, andResponding to Change over Following a Plan

5 Common Mistakes We Make Writing User Stories Most of the issues with gathering requirements in agile software development and agile testing derive from issues with User Stories. Somehow expressing requirements in such a simple form causes a lot of trouble to agile teams. Of course art of writing good User Stories is the most difficult for new teams starting with a new agile project or these, which freshly transformed development methods to agile software development methodologies. Mistakes made at that point lead to wrong Test Cases, wrong understanding of requirements, and the worst of all wrong implementation which can be direct cause of rejecting the deliverables of the iteration. Lets take a look at the five most common mistakes people make writing User Stories. Introduction to User Stories

Brad Fitzpatrick Bradley Joseph "Brad" Fitzpatrick (born February 5, 1980 in Iowa), is an American programmer. He is best known as the creator of LiveJournal and is the author of a variety of free software projects such as memcached and OpenID. Born in Iowa, Fitzpatrick grew up in Beaverton, Oregon and majored in computer science at the University of Washington in Seattle.

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