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Influencers: digital single market performance worst on copyright, cross-border data. Cyberlearning vs. Elearning – Is there a difference? – The Tech Edvocate. The No. 1 Predictor Of Career Success According To Network Science — The Mission. It has been over three years since Steve Jobs died.

The No. 1 Predictor Of Career Success According To Network Science — The Mission

Since then, books have been written and movies have been made. Each has celebrated his legacy and aimed to share the secrets he used to build the largest company in the world; things like attention to detail, attracting world-class talent and holding them to high standards. We think we understand what caused his success. We don’t. We dismiss usable principles of success by labeling them as personality quirks. What’s often missed is the paradoxical interplay of two of his seemingly opposite qualities; maniacal focus and insatiable curiosity.

Jobs’ curiosity fueled his passion and provided him with access to unique insights, skills, values, and world-class people who complemented his own skillset. I don’t just say this as someone who has devoured practically every article, interview, and book featuring him. The Simple Variable That Explains What Really Causes Career Success The bottom line? What a Decade of Education Research Tells Us About Technology in the Hands of Underserved Students. To provide or not to provide course PowerPoint slides? The impact of instructor-provided slides upon student attendance and performance. A Auburn University, USAb West Chester University, USA Received 22 September 2014, Revised 30 January 2015, Accepted 2 February 2015, Available online 10 February 2015 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2015.02.002 Get rights and content Highlights We examined student progress across two semesters comparing three slide conditions: No vs. partial vs. full slides.

To provide or not to provide course PowerPoint slides? The impact of instructor-provided slides upon student attendance and performance

We measured actual student attendance: Instructor-provided slides had no impact on actual class attendance. We examined student use of partial vs. full slides in class note-taking and studying for exams. Instructor-provided slides adversely impacted student course performance on exam items. There were no differences by academic group (high/med/low GPA) on use of slides. Abstract Keywords. Student decisions about lecture attendance: do electronic course materials matter? Releasing slides before lectures – is it really a good idea? I’ve recently been considering the risks and benefits of sharing presentational slides before lectures, and the effect it has on both attendance and performance.

Releasing slides before lectures – is it really a good idea?

Some conclusions from my scoping are shared below. This review is not a recommendation that linear presentation software should be used in classes, clearly this is not the only way to structure learning. Sharing lecture slides (almost universally PowerPoint slides) before a class is widely believed to not negatively impact attendance (e.g. by Billings-Gagliardi & Mazor, 2007; Frank, Shaw & Wilson, 2009; Worthington, & Levasseur, 2015). Billings-Gagliardi & Mazor (2007) conclude “Fears that the increasing availability of technology-enhanced educational materials has a negative impact on lecture attendance seem unfounded” (2007, p573).

The evidence is not entirely unanimous though, with some research, particularly before 2006, pointing to a connection between pre-lecture release and attendance. References to download. Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2015. 7 min read It’s time once again for my annual review of the year in ed-tech.

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2015

This is the sixth year I’ve done so. It’s a fairly massive undertaking – Gates-Foundation-free research, a rarity in ed-tech – which means I have to start thinking about this project long before the end-of-the-year. That always makes me nervous that I’ll leave something out – that something “big” will happen in December that’ll change everything. Or at least, something that’ll change the focus of my analysis. I’m not sure why I worry. But looking back on the last five years of my “Top Ed-Tech Trends,” it does seem as though very little has changed.

Many of the things I have written about previously – and will write about again this year – remain the same. Ed-Tech’s Zombie Ideas 2015 was another great year for “zombie ideas” in ed-tech. Zombie ideas are sort of like SkyMall, which declared bankruptcy in January admitting that people don’t browse its catalog of crap any longer thanks to in-flight Wi-Fi.