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101 Google Tips, Tricks & Hacks. Looking for the ultimate tips for Google searching?

101 Google Tips, Tricks & Hacks

You've just found the only guide to Google you need. Let's get started: 1. The best way to begin searching harder with Google is by clicking the Advanced Search link. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Maslow's hierarchy of needs - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Courses. Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear. The Myth of the Bell Curve. The Data Visualization Beginner’s Toolkit #2: Visualization Tools. (Note: if you are new to this series, the DVBTK doesn’t teach you how to do visualization.

The Data Visualization Beginner’s Toolkit #2: Visualization Tools

Rather it is meant to help people find a less chaotic and more effective path towards the acquisition of the necessary skills to become a data visualization pro. To know more, make sure to read the introduction to the series first.) The DVBTK #1 introduced books and study material to make sure you acquire the right knowledge in the right order. Studying is the first step and there’s no level of practice that can substitute for it.

That said, it is extremely important to realize that good visualization cannot happen without practice. But if you want to do visualization you need some tools right? Here is the guidance. And there is more to come! I felt you needed to know more about each tool, so I decided to interview (at least) one data visualization professional with proven and long-lasting experience with it. Golden Rules of Visualization Tools. D3.js - Data-Driven Documents. Think Twice: How the Gut's "Second Brain" Influences Mood and Well-Being. As Olympians go for the gold in Vancouver, even the steeliest are likely to experience that familiar feeling of "butterflies" in the stomach.

Think Twice: How the Gut's "Second Brain" Influences Mood and Well-Being

Underlying this sensation is an often-overlooked network of neurons lining our guts that is so extensive some scientists have nicknamed it our "second brain". A deeper understanding of this mass of neural tissue, filled with important neurotransmitters, is revealing that it does much more than merely handle digestion or inflict the occasional nervous pang.

The little brain in our innards, in connection with the big one in our skulls, partly determines our mental state and plays key roles in certain diseases throughout the body. Although its influence is far-reaching, the second brain is not the seat of any conscious thoughts or decision-making. This multitude of neurons in the enteric nervous system enables us to "feel" the inner world of our gut and its contents. The second brain informs our state of mind in other more obscure ways, as well. Bias. We'll get it right next time: Gut vs Head. Dan Gardner's Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear offers a psychological model for how we, as ex-hunter-gatherers, make decisions about stuff.

We'll get it right next time: Gut vs Head

Apparently we have two separate modes of thought, which psychologists call System One and System Two and Gardner, with rather more of an eye on bestseller status, calls Head and Gut. Instinctively, you can guess what those mean and some careful thought plus a bit of research would tell you you were right. Gut is where elections are won and lost. Head might sway politicos, journalists, academics and hobbyists/junkies; a full 1% of the population taken care of. Everyone else has better things to do with their time than read economic history or position papers, and so relies on headlines, soundbites and topical comedy shows to tell them what's going on.

Gut is what's killing Labour right now. Doesn't matter. There's a point to this, but at the risk of creating an artificial sense of suspense, I'm going to leave it to my next post. Confirmation bias. 5 Whys - Problem Solving Skills from MindTools. Quickly Getting to the Root of a Problem How to use the 5 Whys technique, with James Manktelow & Amy Carlson.

5 Whys - Problem Solving Skills from MindTools

The 5 Whys is a simple problem-solving technique that helps you to get to the root of a problem quickly. Made popular in the 1970s by the Toyota Production System, the 5 Whys strategy involves looking at any problem and asking: "Why? " and "What caused this problem? " Bradford Hill criteria. The Bradford Hill criteria, otherwise known as Hill's criteria for causation, are a group of minimal conditions necessary to provide adequate evidence of a causal relationship between an incidence and a consequence, established by the English epidemiologist Sir Austin Bradford Hill (1897–1991) in 1965.

Bradford Hill criteria

The list of the criteria is as follows: Strength: A small association does not mean that there is not a causal effect, though the larger the association, the more likely that it is causal.[1]Consistency: Consistent findings observed by different persons in different places with different samples strengthens the likelihood of an effect.[1]Specificity: Causation is likely if a very specific population at a specific site and disease with no other likely explanation. Debate in modern epidemiology[edit] Bradford Hill's criteria are still widely accepted in the modern era as a logical structure for investigating and defining causality in epidemiological study. See also[edit] References[edit]