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EdWebet74. N.C. man told police he went to D.C. pizzeria with gun to investigate conspiracy theory. D.C. police detained a gunman on Dec. 4, who had walked into Comet Ping Pong, a popular Northwest Washington restaurant and music venue.

N.C. man told police he went to D.C. pizzeria with gun to investigate conspiracy theory

Police said no injuries were reported. (Faiz Siddiqui,Bastien Inzaurralde/The Washington Post) D.C. police detained a gunman on Dec. 4, who had walked into Comet Ping Pong, a popular Northwest Washington restaurant and music venue. Police said no injuries were reported. List of fake news websites - Wikipedia. This is a list of websites that have been called fake news sites.

List of fake news websites - Wikipedia

These sites intentionally publish hoaxes and disinformation to drive web traffic rather than for a humorous purpose, as in news satire. This list also excludes sites that promote conspiracy theories based on apparently genuine belief (as opposed to a conscious intent to misinform or to gather web traffic). Some of these sites use a URL that ends in .co or otherwise resembling genuine news sites.[1][2] We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned : All Tech Considered.

"The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right.

We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned : All Tech Considered

" Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Fanatic Studio/Getty Images "The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right. " A lot of fake and misleading news stories were shared across social media during the election. How technology disrupted the truth.

One Monday morning last September, Britain woke to a depraved news story.

How technology disrupted the truth

The prime minister, David Cameron, had committed an “obscene act with a dead pig’s head”, according to the Daily Mail. “A distinguished Oxford contemporary claims Cameron once took part in an outrageous initiation ceremony at a Piers Gaveston event, involving a dead pig,” the paper reported. Piers Gaveston is the name of a riotous Oxford university dining society; the authors of the story claimed their source was an MP, who said he had seen photographic evidence: “His extraordinary suggestion is that the future PM inserted a private part of his anatomy into the animal.”

The story, extracted from a new biography of Cameron, sparked an immediate furore. It was gross, it was a great opportunity to humiliate an elitist prime minister, and many felt it rang true for a former member of the notorious Bullingdon Club. Russian propaganda effort helped spread ‘fake news’ during election, experts say. Editor’s Note: The Washington Post on Nov. 24 published a story on the work of four sets of researchers who have examined what they say are Russian propaganda efforts to undermine American democracy and interests.

Russian propaganda effort helped spread ‘fake news’ during election, experts say

One of them was PropOrNot, a group that insists on public anonymity, which issued a report identifying more than 200 websites that, in its view, wittingly or unwittingly published or echoed Russian propaganda. A number of those sites have objected to being included on PropOrNot’s list, and some of the sites, as well as others not on the list, have publicly challenged the group’s methodology and conclusions. Here’s a Browser Extension That Will Flag Fake-News Sites. The fight against fake news is being fought on many fronts in homes and offices across America, but companies like Facebook and Google have been reluctant to issue any sort of explicit, top-down editorial enjoinments about what can and cannot be posted on their platforms.

Here’s a Browser Extension That Will Flag Fake-News Sites

This is understandable — corporations are loath to enter the politically tricky territory of determining the legitimacy of a given news outlet. But as we enter a fraught period of American life, it’s important to make sure you (and your friends and relatives) can at least avoid being snookered by hoax, satire, fake, and just plain incompetent news sites. Snopes' Field Guide to Fake News Sites and Hoax Purveyors. The sharp increase in popularity of social media networks (primarily Facebook) has created a predatory secondary market among online publishers seeking to profitably exploit the large reach of those networks and their huge customer bases by spreading fake news and outlandish rumors.

Snopes' Field Guide to Fake News Sites and Hoax Purveyors

Competition for social media’s large supply of willing eyeballs is fierce, and a number of frequent offenders regularly fabricate salacious and attention-grabbing tales simply to drive traffic (and revenue) to their sites. Facebook has worked at limiting the reach of hoax-purveying sites in their customers’ news feeds, inhibiting (but not eradicating) the spread of fake news stories.

Hoaxes and fake news are often little more than annoyances to unsuspecting readers; but sometimes circulating stories negatively affect businesses or localities by spreading false, disruptive claims that are widely believed. National Report. Hackers use typosquatting to dupe the unwary with fake news, sites. SAN FRANCISCO – The proliferation of fake news has shone a light on another murky corner the web, the practice of typosquatting.

Hackers use typosquatting to dupe the unwary with fake news, sites

These are the URLs that pass for common ones — say Amazoon.com instead of Amazon.com — if the user isn't paying close attention to the Web address. Always eager to capitalize on human inattention, cyber criminals have embraced this method of registering a commonly misspelled Web address to use as a base for the distribution of malware or to steal information from unsuspecting users.

“They create a site that looks essentially like the real one, at least on the surface. It’s fairly straightforward to do and then you’re simply relying on human nature to not notice,” said Steve Grobman, chief technology officer at Intel Security. Sometimes called URL hijacking, multiple media sites have been hit with the ploy, including usatoday.com (usatodaycom.com) and abcnews.com ( abcnews.com.co.)

How to Spot and Debunk Fake News. This Analysis Shows How Fake Election News Stories Outperformed Real News On Facebook - BuzzFeed News. Forbes Welcome. The Fact Checker’s guide for detecting fake news. Consider these points before sharing a news article on Facebook.

The Fact Checker’s guide for detecting fake news

It could be fake. (Monica Akhtar/The Washington Post) Consider these points before sharing a news article on Facebook. In the war on fake news, school librarians have a huge role to play - The Verge. Lowrider Librarian: Fake News Stories are Related to Culture and Information Literacy. [This blog post is a sketch of ideas.

Lowrider Librarian: Fake News Stories are Related to Culture and Information Literacy

I plan on fleshing these ideas out. I want to share them now though.] Fake News as Related to Culture and Information Literacy: The recent information that has come out about fake news sites and stories that were shared on social media and influenced the recent elections are directly related to the concept of Information and Culture. The idea of controlling public perception via the control of media was perfected by the Nazis' Josef Goebbels.

N.C. man told police he went to D.C. pizzeria with assault rifle to ‘self-investigate’ election-related conspiracy theory. Incoming national security adviser's son, who peddles conspiracies, has a government transition email. Michael G. Flynn, the son of retired Lt. Gen. Michael T. Disinformation - Wikipedia. Disinformation is intentionally false or misleading information that is spread in a calculated way to deceive target audiences.[1][2][3] The English word, which did not appear in dictionaries until the late-1980s, is a translation of the Russian дезинформация, transliterated as dezinformatsiya.[1][2][3] Disinformation is different from misinformation, which is information that is unintentionally false.[4] Misinformation can be used to define disinformation — where disinformation is misinformation that is purposefully and intentionally disseminated in order to defraud.[5] Disinformation saw wider use as a term of Soviet tradecraft, defined in the 1952 official Great Soviet Encyclopedia as spreading "false information with the intention to deceive public opinion.

Etymology and early usage[edit] Usage of the term related to a Russian tactical weapon started in 1923, when the Deputy Chairman of the KGB-precursor the State Political Directorate (GPU), I. Before ‘fake news,’ there was Soviet ‘disinformation’ A photograph of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin lies on a floor outside a courtroom in Moscow, on Oct. 13, 2009, (Pavel Golovkin/Associated Press) On July 17, 1983, a small pro-Soviet Indian newspaper called the Patriot published a front-page article titled “AIDS may invade India: Mystery disease caused by US experiments.” The story cited a letter from an anonymous but “well-known American scientist and anthropologist” that suggested AIDS, then still a mysterious and deadly new disease, had been created by the Pentagon in a bid to develop new biological weapons.

“Now that these menacing experiments seem to have gone out of control, plans are being hatched to hastily transfer them from the U.S. to other countries, primarily developing nations where governments are pliable to Washington's pressure and persuasion,” the article read. The problem? The story was patently false. How An Isamophobic Smear Trickled Down From Fox Biz To Hit One Alaska Family. On Dec. 1, Ryan Mauro, a national security analyst at the Clarion Project, told Fox Business that Donald Trump’s election prompted “Islamic compounds” across the country to accumulate weapons and prepare for raids. A local elected official in Anchorage who co-chaired Donald Trump's campaign in the state picked up Mauro’s comments and used them to cast suspicion on a local Muslim man who has lived in the area for eight years. By the end of the weekend, the man and his family were reportedly receiving threats. The rapid-fire cycle points to how quickly baseless claims from fringe groups can percolate through mainstream media down to ground level.

Mauro’s Washington, D.C. Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world. A post that is mostly a really long list of links to other people’s stuff on media literacy and fake news… The “fake news” problem is all over the news and all of the sudden everybody wants to be “information literate” and “media literate.” This is a good thing in the scheme of things because maintaining a functional democracy with a populous that is information or media illiterate is … really, really hard. Making my thinking visible even though I can’t draw very well … YET! [Did you see what I just did there?] Hahaha! A little gritty humor… [Did you see what I just did again?]

News Use Across Social Media Platforms 2016. Google, democracy and the truth about internet search. Eli Pariser: Beware online "filter bubbles". Blue Feed, Red Feed. Verification Handbook: homepage. 10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog. Germany investigates fake news after bogus Breitbart story - The Verge. Germany investigating unprecedented spread of fake news online. It’s time to retire the tainted term ‘fake news’

2016 Lie of the Year: Fake news. Reading News across the Political Spectrum. The Failure of Facebook Democracy. News Coverage of the 2016 General Election: How the Press Failed the Voters - Shorenstein Center. News Coverage of the 2016 General Election: How the Press Failed the Voters - Shorenstein Center. No, Hillary Clinton did not get more votes than any candidate ever. Young people aren't skeptical of 'fake news' Media literacy courses help high school students spot fake news. Most Students Don’t Know When News Is Fake, Stanford Study Finds. False, Misleading, Clickbait-y, and Satirical “News” Sources. Getting ‘REAL’ with web evaluation – Linking Learning. How I Detect Fake News – Tim O'Reilly – Medium. University of Toronto Libraries.