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Precision Medicine

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Theranos phenomenon: promises and fallacies. There Is Nothing Personal. Genetic test costs US $500 million a year, with little benefit. We hear a lot about the wonders of genetic testing, how it can revolutionize medicine and find cures for fatal diseases.

Genetic test costs US $500 million a year, with little benefit

A new study from the University of Michigan also shows how it can waste a half a billion dollars a year. Researchers at the university examined testing for inherited thrombophilia, a genetic quirk that can indicate a patient’s likelihood of developing dangerous blood clots. article continues after advertisement It sounds like a useful test to have. But, according to the researchers, knowing that you have the trait will not change your treatment. Limits to Personalized Cancer Medicine. Precision Medicine and Population Health: Dealing With the Elephant in the Room. In this week’s Journal of American Medical Association, we published a point-counterpoint commentary on the impact of precision medicine on population health.

Precision Medicine and Population Health: Dealing With the Elephant in the Room

Personalised medicine has obvious benefits but has anyone thought about the issues? US Vice President Joe Biden recently launched The Genomic Data Commons, an open-access database that contains genomic and clinical data of 12,000 patients.

Personalised medicine has obvious benefits but has anyone thought about the issues?

The aim is to allow researchers to better understand cancer’s development, which will help tailor treatments to individuals' particular cancers. This kind of approach is called personalised medicine and is said to be the next frontier in health care. A recent study in the journal Nature, for instance, reported groundbreaking research on the genetic causes of breast cancer. Prevalent cancer-associated mutations detected in apparently healthy group - Scienmag. In a study of 36 women – 16 diagnosed with ovarian cancer and a control group of 20 with no cancer diagnosis – nearly all of the women were found to carry cancer-associated gene mutations.

Prevalent cancer-associated mutations detected in apparently healthy group - Scienmag

The study was an early test of the power of DNA duplex sequencing, a technology developed at the University of Washington. Duplex sequencing independently tags molecules along both strands of DNA. The impact of communicating genetic risks of disease on risk-reducing health behaviour: systematic review with meta-analysis. Why whole-genome testing hurts more than it helps. President Obama proposes to plunk down $215 million on "precision medicine," and the National Institutes of Health and its National Cancer Institute will spend it by sequencing the whole genome of a million or more Americans.

Why whole-genome testing hurts more than it helps

Is whole-genome testing the path to health? The short answer is no. The main problem with the proposal is that the research is bound to produce more noise than signal. The issue isn't genetics but "big" data. The basic idea of precision medicine is to look for patterns in the genome that seem to travel with problems we all care about: diabetes, heart disease, cancer and dementia. The side effects of translational omics: overtesting, overdiagnosis, overtreatment : Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) Is the Pathway Genomics Liquid Biopsy Cancer Test Legit? Catch cancer early for just $699?

Is the Pathway Genomics Liquid Biopsy Cancer Test Legit?

That is the pitch by Pathway Genomics, a diagnostic company in San Diego that began marketing a blood test to consumers today that it says can detect DNA mutations harbored by unseen cancer cells in your body. The test sounds like great idea. Who wouldn’t want to know if they have cancer lurking somewhere? But it’s not quite so simple. Finding Risks, Not Answers, in Gene Tests. Photo Jennifer was 39 and perfectly healthy, but her grandmother had died young from breast cancer, so she decided to be tested for mutations in two genes known to increase risk for the disease.

Finding Risks, Not Answers, in Gene Tests

When a genetic counselor offered additional tests for 20 other genes linked to various cancers, Jennifer said yes. The more information, the better, she thought. The results, she said, were “surreal.” She did not have mutations in the breast cancer genes, but did have one linked to a high risk of stomach cancer. William Cayley: About what are we being precise? I’ve been too swamped with the day to day realities of teaching, patient care, and just plain real life lately to be very reflective, but Zackary Berger and Dave deBronkart finally spurred me on to put fingers to keyboard, and put words to my thoughts on the nascent move towards “precision medicine.”

William Cayley: About what are we being precise?

From the first, when I heard of Mr Obama’s precision medicine initiative, I was underwhelmed (at best) and fearful of more misdirected use of resources at worst. We are currently working daily through the challenges of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which on the plus side has made healthcare coverage available for many people who had none before, but on the downside it has added paperwork, reporting, and mandated screenings that I cannot see doing anything other than increasing workload without any clear benefit.

Beyond my worries about excessive mandates, I am also concerned about the increasingly tarnished reputations of some of the “latest and greatest” in medical ventures. Zip code better predictor of health than genetic code. The "Delmar Divide," St.

Zip code better predictor of health than genetic code

Louis, Mo. August 4, 2014 — In St. Louis, Missouri, Delmar Boulevard marks a sharp dividing line between the poor, predominately African American neighborhood to the north and a more affluent, largely white neighborhood to the south. Education and health also follow the “Delmar Divide,” with residents to the north less likely to have a bachelor’s degree and more likely to have heart disease or cancer. Pointing to Delmar as an example, Melody Goodman, an assistant professor at Washington University in St. Direct to consumer genetic testing in Canada: should we be concerned?

Public Health in the Precision-Medicine Era — NEJM. That clinical medicine has contributed enormously to our ability to treat and cure sick people is beyond contention.

Public Health in the Precision-Medicine Era — NEJM

Theconversation. OVER-DIAGNOSIS EPIDEMIC – Today Jacqueline Savard talks about the growing prevalence of genetic testing and what impact they have on over-diagnosis. Genetic testing and screening is increasingly becoming a presence in our lives. Daily news reports discuss new associations between genes and common conditions. And these associations are used to calculate risks for individuals who have the genes for the conditions, but don’t display any symptoms. Seven Questions for Personalized Medicine. Moonshot Medicine Will Let Us Down.